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fROPERn^*^ 



BR 782 .M32 1843 
McCosh, James, 1811-1894. 
The wheat and the chaff 
gathered into bundles 



THE WHEAT AND THE CHAFF 

6ATHEBED INTO BUNDLES. 



THE WHEAT AND THE CHAFF 
GATHERED INTO BUNDLES ; 

A 

STATISTICAL CONTRIBUTION 

T0WAUD3 

THE HISTOEY OF THE EECENT DISRUPTION 

OF THE 

SCOTTISH ECCLESIASTICAL ESTABLISHMENT. 



BY JAMES*M^COSH, 

EDITOR OF THE DUNDEE WAUDER. 



PERTH, JAMES DEWAR : 

DUNDEE, W. MIDDLETON ; ABERDEEN, J. DAVIDSON ; 

EDINBURGH, W. WHYTE &C0., JOHN JOHNSTONE, C. ZEIGLER, AV. P. KENNEDY, 

AND M'DONALDS, BROTHERS ; 

GLASGOW, W. COLLINS, D. BRYCE, OGLE & SON ; 

GREENOCK, J. G. BANKIER. 

TsisT 



PRINTKD AT THE WARnKR OFFICK, VUJ^DVT.. 







INTRODUCTION. ^ 



The Compiler of tlie folloAving pages deems that little apology 
is due for the object and design of his undertaking, whatever 
may be required for the imperfections of its execution. In the 
full inibroken strength of a period of great reviA^al — in the middle 
of a career of constantly growing and extending usefulness, and 
of a progress rapid and imswerA'ing towards unexampled purity 
of doctrine and discipline — the Church of Scotland has been sud- 
denly cast down from her place among the national establish- 
ments of Christianity. With her fall there is lost to the people 
of Scotland the rich inheritance purchased for them of old by the 
faithful contendings, the blood, the prayers, of their martyred 
fathers ; and to the Church at large, and to the nations, the only 
liring, existing model, ever presented in the history of Christen- 
dom, of a Church allied to the State, and yet bearing soothfast 
allegiance to her glorious King and Head, maintaining, in the 
fullest sense, her freedom to be governed in all respects by the 
dictates of His holy Word, rendering unto Ccesar the things 
which are Cresar's, and unto God the things which are God's. 
The defence of this noble and unequalled institution — this em- 
bodiment of principles, the complete development and full supre- 
macy of -which will doubtless form one of the sources of glory and 
blessedness in the approaching millenial day — lay, in the first 
and most especial manner, upon the ministers of that Church, 
from their position as Avatchmen i;pon the watch-towers of Zion, 
and by the awful vows to God taken by each of them on the day 
of his ordination, by which he became solemnly pledged to main- 
tain it in the entirencss and purity of its doctrine, discipline, and 
worship, " Avhatsoever persecution miglit arise." It belongs, there- 
fore, to the people of Scotland, Avho have been defrauded of so 
noble an inheritance, and to the. Church of Christ at large, as 
interested in the entireness of the gospel truth, and as de- 



6 INTRODUCTION. 

prived of so fair a model of a just and scriptural alliance betwixt 
Churcli and State, and to future history, to know how they and 
each of them have discharged this all important duty, that the 
men of this generation, and their children after them, may, by 
the glorious example of the faithful, be encouraged to patient en- 
durance, and animated to costly sacrifices and heroic achieve- 
ments in the great battle of the Cross, and warned by the 
melancholy record of those who have openly ranged them- 
selves under the banners of the foe, or who have turned back 
in the day of battle, of human weakness, and taught to shun 
dependence upon an arm of flesh. To furnish a contribution 
towards supplying this information is the purpose of the present 
publication ; and, imperfect as the attempt may in some respects 
be found, yet does it furnish forth one of the most strange and 
striking and instructive mementos, at once of the strength and 
weakness of religious principle, which perhaps the whole annals 
of the Church can supply. 

With these few words by Avay of introduction, the compiler pro- 
ceeds to offer some brief explanations of the plan he has pursued in 
the arrangements of his Avork, and to draAV attention to one or two 
of the more striking results'which his labours have educed. His 
plan has at least, it is conceived, simplicity to recommend it. It 
follows undeviatingly the customary ecclesiastical arrangements 
of presbyteries and synods, commencing with the Synod of Lothian 
and Tweeddale, and the metropolitan Presbytery of Edinburgh, 
and proceeding as nearly as possible according to geographical 
position. In each presbytery, the ministers, as at the date of 
the disruption, are separated into two great divisions. The 
First Division comprises the names of those ministers, and of 
their former parishes, who have adhered to the Free Church. 
The Second Division, on the other hand, comprises the names 
and parislics of all who have adhered to the Establishment. 
This latter division is again subdivided into two distinct classes. 
The First Class comprises those Avho may be ranked as of the 
old Moderate type — disciples of the school and props of the 
system of Principal Robertson. While the Second Class com- 
prehends those Avho professed the same principles as the adhe- 
rents of the Free Church, and throughout the controversy Avere 
more or less active and forAvard in their advocacy and support of the 
Evanoelical cause, but Avhohave. neA'ertheless, seen it to be meet 



INTRODUCTION. 7 

and good in the issne to retain tlieir connection with an establish- 
ment in which principles they so often professed to hold to be fun- 
damental, and essential to the constitution of every true Church of 
Christ, have been trampled under foot, and virtually declared by 
express statute to be contrary to law. In all these various sec- 
tions, the arrangement is according to priority of ordination ; and 
the names of such parishes or charges as had no endowment from 
the State are distinguished by being printed in italics. At the 
close of each synod, there is a general view of the state of par- 
ties, and thei result of the disruption over it ; and statistical 
tables are likewise given at the proper place illustrative of the 
same facts ov^r the whole Church, and of the composition of the 
various sections as tested by the dates of the several ordinations 
of the ministers respectively composing them. 

With regard to Universities, it has not been considered ne- 
cessary to present any separate view of them. The only profes- 
sors whose duties are of such a character, as that adherence to 
the Free Church properly exposes them to the necessity of resig- 
nation, are the Professors of Divinity and Church History, and 
the occupants of the chairs for these faculties in the various Uni- 
versities will be found ranged along with the presbyteries witliin 
whose bounds they are. Many of the most eminent Professors 
of other faculties, it is true, such as Principal Sir David Brewster 
of St AndreAVS, Dr Fleming, the distinguished Professor of Na- 
tural Philosophy, and Mr Bentley, the Professor of Oriental Lan- 
guages, both of King's College, Aberdeen ; Dr Brown, Professor 
of Greek, Marischal College, Aberdeen ; with several other dis- 
tinguished Professors at Glasgow and elsewhere, have adhered to 
the Free Church, and have been in most cases, in consequence, 
subjected to much annoyance, and threatened vntli expulsion from 
their chairs by the vindictive and vengeful spleen of the Resi- 
duary Presbyteries of St Andrews and Aberdeen ; but we have no 
thought that the issue will be other than to prove that their pro- 
ceedings are as impotent as they are in every sense despicable and 
reprehensible. As respecting ministers of Chapels of Ease, and 
salaried Missionaries, having no seats in church courts, separate 
classified rolls of them will be found following the body of the 
work. To these there is likewise added a roll of the Probationers 
adhering to the Free Church. Their sacrifices, prospectively 
speaking, are only second to those of the ministers : and it seemed 



8 INTRODUCTION. 

only due to them to make honourable record of their names. 
Finally, an Appendix is added, containing the Solemn Engage- 
ment, the Convocation Resolutions, and other documents which 
seemed necessary to a proper apprehension of the more testing 
votes given, and pledges made, by Class Second of the Residuary 
Ministers. 

In regard to the First Division, under the foregoing plan, the 
adherents of the Free Church, the simple record of their names as 
such has been deemed sufficient. While they continued in the Esta- 
blishment there were slight differences of opinion amongst them, 
principally touching how far a properly regulated and limited sys- 
tem of patronage was desirable, or might be lawfully submitted to by 
a Church of Christ. Even that difference was, by the progress of 
events, pretty well purged before the disruption, and it related 
entirely to a state of things which, so far as they are concerned, 
has no longer an existence. It is, therefore, practically at an end ; 
and it is not desirable that the memory of it should be farther pre- 
served. In the two great principles — the first, that no pastor 
shall be intruded upon a reclaiming congregation ; and the second, 
of which the first, properly and strictly speaking, is only a conse- 
quence and a part, that the Lord Jesus Christ is the alone King 
and Head of his Church ; and that, as such, his word must be 
consulted and obeyed as the supreme rule for the government 
and regulation of the Church, in preference, and, if need be, in 
opposition to the mandates of any earthly tribunal or authority — 
they were ever heart and soul united. Of the depth and sin- 
cerity of their convictions in regard to these — of the mighty 
energy and power of that all-prevailing faith, which filled their 
hearts — they have furnished a proof over which the universal 
Church of Christ rejoices, at Avhich an incredidous world stands 
amazed, and which, with all its art, it cannot explain away. In 
the sight of heaven and earth they stand confessed a noble and 
determined band of Christian heroes. The simple record of their 
names as members of this band is in itself a high and proud 
eulogium ; and the writer cannot but regard it as an honour- 
able and pious labour to complete and transmit such a record 
for the use of the future historian. He has often felt painful 
regret that, after the neglect for years of the performance 
of a similar duty for the 400 faithful men who, for the like 
cause, were driven from their pulpits and their flocks, a hun- 



INTRODUCTION. '■> 

dred and sixty years ago, even all tlie assiduity of a Wodrow 
was able so inadequately to accomplish it. It may be, per- 
haps,, supposed by some, that he should have, in a parti- 
cular manner, distinguished those eminent and devoted men, 
who have been raised up and endowed of GrOD as the chief and 
leading instruments in this great and vital contest ; but, besides 
being scarcely within the scope of the present undertaking, it 
was altogether unnecessary to do so. In the present day, their 
names are familiar as household words, and there is no fear but 
some future M'Crie will do them ample justice ; and it is, upon 
the whole, better that, in a merely statistical compilation like 
the present, all should stand upon the simple and undistinguished 
Presbyterian level of brethren in the Lord, and fellow-soldiers 
and sufferers in the same good cause. 

In regard, likewise, to the First Ckiss of the Residuary Esta- 
blishment, a similar simple record of names has been deemed suf- 
ficient. This is not on account of any particular unity or cohe- 
rence of general sentiment amongst them. By far the largest 
class, it is true, are still of the genuine type of ancient Mode- 
ratism; and more especially in the spiritual wastes of Aberdeen- 
shire, and of the southern districts of Scotland, specimens of the 
tribe, pure and uncontaminated as the days of Robertson could 
furnish, may be gleaned in abundance. There is a section, how- 
ever, and by no means an inconsiderable one in point of numbers, 
whom the gro-wing Evangelism of the age has not left without im- 
pressions of a certain kind, Avho are, perhaps, as far as they can be, 
Evangelical in their preaching, and a few of them even occasionally 
somewhat so in their speeches in Church Courts, but who, in the 
general current of their lives, and of the Church polity which, by 
their votes, they support, are Moderates in the strictest sense of 
the epithet. There is even a third section, but not a numerous 
one, who make high pretensions to spirituality ; but it is of an 
unhealthy, sentimental caste, and is united with lordly notions 
of Church power and authority far more befitting the mitre and 
lawn of the prelate than the plain Genevan gown and cap of the 
simple Presbyterian minister. There are also a few who may 
have recorded a fitful and capricious vote for Evangelical mea- 
sures, repented of almost as soon as given, or at least recanted the 
moment the slightest threatening appeared of their becoming mat- 
ters of serious controversy. It has been considered altogether 



10 INTRODUCTION. 

useless, and, indeed, would have been in a manner impossible, to 
discriminate with anything like accuracy amongst all these 
various sections. They are all entitled to the merit, such 
as it is, of having subscribed their adherence to standards, 
some of the most essential and peculiar principles of which 
at the very moment of such subscription they to all practical 
effects rejected ; and of having pursued their subsequent course 
in general consistency with this auspicious and honourable com- 
mencement of their ecclesiastical career. Although their grounds 
of action may have somewhat varied, the result at which their po- 
licy has aimed has been, to all practical results, the same, viz., the 
depression of Evangelical principles and sway, and the resuscita- 
tion of that evil system, whose bitter fruits are so abundantly 
apparent in the records of the past, and which, it is scarcely to be 
questioned, is destined to supply the most ample materials to fill 
an equally dark and gloomy page in the records of the future. It 
is, therefore, quite enough to know of such men that they were 
Moderates. 

With respect, however, to the Second Class of the Eesiduary 
Establishment, it has been deemed incumbent to pursue a dilBFe- 
rent course. It has been thought fitting to mention, in regard to 
each of them, some of the specific grounds on which he is placed 
in it. In the execution of this task, the writer has confined him- 
self as much as possible to the record of public facts, leaving the 
necessary inferences from these facts to be gleaned by each reader 
for himself. But it is not to be concealed that these facts afibrd, 
in most cases, but a faint and inadequate'ijortraiture of the men ; 
and that, to have rendered it anything like complete in finish and 
detail, it would have been necessary to . refer far more parti- 
cularly to their repeated and solemn declarations of their belief 
and reception of the principles at issue, not only as principles of 
the standards of the Church, but of the eternal Word of God — 
to their vows and resolutions to maintain them at all hazards — 
to their professions of readiness to suffer the loss of all things — 
to take to the hill-side, like their persecuted fiithers — to lay their 
heads upon the block rather than surrender their principles — to their 
solemn inculcation of them from the pulpit — and their still more 
solemn appeals in their behalf to GoD in prayer. There are not 
few amongst them of whom the fitting type is to be found in that 
"Mr Patrick Galloway," Avho, in other and kindred times, offered to 



INTRODUCTION. 11 

sig-n the protestation against Prelacy with his blood, and " took it ill 
if he were asked to eat a Christmas pie," and in that " Mr William 
Struthers," who being in GlasgoAv, and happening to see Bishop 
Spottiswood on the street, went into a shop, and fell into a swoon, 
and on recovering, being asked what had befallen him, exclaimed, 
"What ! saw ye not the character of the beast coming !" but who 
both afterwards became vehement partizans of Prelacy. Nor is this 
to be wondered at ; for, as is judiciously, and as applied to present 
circumstances, most strikingly and truly remarked by Thomas 
M'Crie, " He has studied history and observed life to little pur- 
pose who has not discovered, that those who make the most flam- 
ing professions of zeal, when professions may be made without dan- 
ger or inconvenience, or who show an over-strained strictness 
about matters of really small moment, are generally the first to 
yield when the trial of principle arrives, and turn out the most 
bitter opponents of their brethren who, though they made less 
noise about their faithfulness, have nevertheless stood faithful in 
the evil day."* In offering these remarks, the writer is influenced 
by a regard to truth, and what its interests demand at his hand, 
alone; for he has no desire to write, or speak, or think, of 
the parties in question too harshly. He feels the power of 
the trial from which they have shrunk ; and he is far from 
wishing it to be understood that he permits himself to entertain 
any boastful confidence, as if his own strength would have been 
sufficient to have carried him in safety through it, had it been 
presented to himself. But, while compassion is a proper and 
legitimate feeling to cherish towards them, it is impossible to 
entertain for them as a body any shred of respect or esteem. 
They have doubtless been able in some degree to satisfy their 
own minds that the course they have pursued is the right 
one ; though it will be hard for those wlio have not the same 
inducements they possess to understand the grounds upon 
which they have proceeded. There is one amongst many 
simple views of the case, Avhich, if they would present to 
themselves, must, it is thought, startle them from their security. 
Suppose that their more faithful and steadfast brethren who 
have formed the 'Free Church had all, or even in any very 
large portion, acted precisely as they have done, and remained 

* M'Crie's Sketches of Scottish Church Histoiy, p. 172. 



12 INTRODUCTION. 

in tlis Establishment, can tliey not perceive the conse(iuence 
which must have resulted to the cause of Christianity ? Does 
not, at the bare supposition, the loud exulting shout of a godless 
world, over the fall of those who made so brave a profession of 
obnoxious truth, ring through fancy's ear, and awaken the sleep- 
ing echoes of conscience I And is there not pictured forth before 
imagination's eye the consequent shame and sinking of heart of 
the people of God — the general reproach, obloquy, and suspicion 
thrown over the very name of religion — and the ministerial 
character for truthfulness, sincerity, and fortitude, become a scoff 
and a bye-word in the mouths of the profane and the infidel ? 
As matters have been ordered in Providence, by the noble self- 
sacrificing faith of those whom they are now but too generally 
ready to reproach and revile, Christianity has gathered additional 
strength and renown from the issue ; but so far as tJiei/ are con- 
cerned, the full responsibility of tlie worst result rests upon them. 

It but now remains to draw attention to some of the more re- 
markable statistical facts brought out by the Tables which 
accompany the following pages ; and it may be observed, regard- 
ing the strength of parties, that from Table No. I it appears — 

1st, That the total number of ordained ministers having seats 
in Church Courts in the Establishment at the time of the dis- 
ruption, was 1195, and the number of vacant charges 53. 

2d, That the proportion of those who have adhered to the 
Free Church is 454,* and to the Establishment 741, — the latter 
number consisting of ministers in class first 481, and in class 
second 260. Likewise, that the strength of what may be called 
the old Evangelical party — that is to say, Avhat it was or would 
have been had no season of trial or difficulty arisen to divide it 
into sections — was 714. 

In regard, again, to the rate or j^ercentagc of secession, the 
following results appear from the same table : — 

1st, That, taken over the vrhole Church, the secession attains 
to a percentage of 37.908, or almost thirty-eight out of eVery 
hundred ministers it contained at the disruption. Over the 



* If to this number be added "the adherents among the ministers of chapels of 
ease, the missionaries ou the royal bounty, and the missionaries on foreign stations 
(the latter have all adhered), who were mostly ordained ministers, and who all held 
salaried ai)iiointments, the number of adherents to the Free Church exceeds 500. 



INTRODUCTION. 13 

eight southern synods, again, it is 37.065 ; and ovei' the eight 
northern synods, 39.713. It thus appears, which was perhaps 
scarcely the general opinion, that, tested by the rate of secession, 
the northern synods, notwithstanding of the interjection of Aber- 
deen like a lump of ice in the heart of them, were someAvhat more 
evangelical than the southern. Again, the greatest rate of seces- 
sion in any particular synod is in that of Koss, where 75.802 per 
cent., or rather more than three-fourths of the ministers, have 
gone out ; and it is least in that of Dumfries, where only 19.048 
per cent., or rather less than one-fifth of the whole ministers, 
have gone out. With respect to the five great synods, Lothian 
and Tweeddale, Glasgow and Ayr, Perth and Stirling, Angus 
and Mearns, and Aberdeen, which contain each upwards of a 
hundred ministers, it is greatest in Perth and Stirling, where it 
is 48.039, and least in Aberdeen, where it is 31.25. 

2d, Confined, on the other hand, to the old Evangelical party, 
the percentage of secession over the aggregate number (714), 
of which it was composed, is 63.585 — that is to say, almost 
two-thirds of those who ever professed in any degree to enter- 
tain Evangelical principles have made the costly sacrifice of 
their earthly all rather than betray them, while little more 
than one-third have proved faint-hearted in the hour of trial. 
Taking it, again, over the eight southern synods, the rate is 
59.815 per cent ; and over the eight northern, it is 71.244 per 
cent. Tried by this test, also, the northern synods have thus 
likewise the advantage. Their Evangelism, besides being pro- 
portionally more abundant, has proved itself to be possessed 
of superior endurance to that of their southern neighbours. In 
regard to particular synods, Ross once more appears in the 
first rank, not less than 88 per cent, of its professing Evan- 
gelism having broken connection mth the State ; while Ork- 
ney is very considerably the meanest of all, only a little more 
than forty-one per cent, of the once overwhelming strength of 
Evangelism in that synod having withdrawn. Finally, taking 
the five great synods above-mentioned, it is greatest in Aber- 
deen and Angus and Mearns, which are about equal in this 
respect, and in each of which rather more than 72 per cent, of 
the professing Evangelical section have withdrawn ; and least in 
that of Glasgow and Ayr, where the rate is only 59.3. 

The results brought out by Table No. II., which exhibits the 
composition of parties as tested by the dates of ordination, are 



14 INTRODUCTION, 

equally interesting with those elicited by the first Table. The 
Table exhibits the composition of each synod in this respect ; but 
the totals, as regards the whole Church, stands as follows : — 

Ordained before 1800 to 1810 to 1820 to 1830 to 1840 to 1843 

1 Free Church 12 27 59 109 208 39 

2 Residuary Estab. — 

Class First 59 75 100 128 91 28 

Class Second 6 22 39 86 90 17 

One of the first and most obvious results which these numbers 
present is the progress of Evangelism in the Church. It may 
justly be calculated that the deaths on either side of the Church 
have been proportionally great, and that the survivors of those 
ordained before any particular year afford a fair representation 
of the relative strength and proportion of parties as at that parti- 
cular year. Talcing, therefore (which is necessary to arrive at 
just views on this head), the numbers of the Free Churchmen and 
of the Second Class Residiiaries together, and as opposed to the 
old Moderate party, we find that in 1800 the strength of parties 
stood in the proportion of 59 old Moderates to 18 professing 
Evangelicals ! This was the era of the quashing of missionary 
enterprise, by solemn resolution of the General Assembly, and of 
the passing of the famous or infamous act of 1799, barring the 
pulpits of the Establishment against Mr Simeon of Cambridge, 
Rowland Hill, and such other Evangelical firebrands. Passing on 
again to 1810, we find the numbers stand 134 Moderates to 67 
Evangelicals. The latter had, therefore, advanced from being 
less than a third to be exactly half as numerous as their oppo- 
nents. Just Avhen the night had attained its darkest, morn- 
ing began to brighten in the horizon. Progressing still onwards to 
1820, the numbers are 234 to 165. Moderatism retains a decided 
majority, but Evangelism has made a long stride upon it and has 
now become a formidable party. This was the era when Dr An- 
drew Thomson, of mighty memory, was assailing the iniquities of 
the system, and by and bye succeeded in sweeping away plurali- 
ties, Avitli a host of its other corruptions. Still, coming up another 
decade, we reach 1830, when the numbers stand 362 to 360. The 
knell of Moderatism had about rung out, its sceptre was broken, 
and its power was passing away. In 1834 the Veto act was 
passed ; and a little more union and energy amongst its supporters 
might have carried it sooner. Passing now to 1840, the numbers 
are 454 to 667. During the ten years that but a little poAver was 
conceded to the popular voice, 298 settlements were in favour of 



INTRODUCTION. 15 

Evangelism and only 91 ! against it. Does not Moderatism 
well to hate and dread the popular influence, which thus so 
emphatically pronounces, wherever it has sway, sentence of 
extinction against it ? But the days of the prosperity of Evan- 
gelism in the Establishment had now drawn to a conclusion. 
The Tories had returned to power ; and because Evangelism pre- 
ferred — obstinately preferred — the eternal interests of the popula- 
tion, and the law of its God, to the inclinations and prejudices of 
the aristocracy, it must be put down. To effect this object was 
the latest " holy alliance" formed. Patrons and Ministers of the 
CroAvn banded together ; and no faithful minister of the Gospel 
must be admitted — none but sure men, who had sworn vassalage to 
the patrons and the Civil Courts. It is not asserted that this was 
universal, but it did notoriously prevail to a large extent; and by 
its marked effect upon the numbers from 1840 to 1843, the extent 
of its influence may in some degree be calculated. Only 39 seced- 
ing ministers entered the Church during that period, and of these 
the large proportion were ministers of Church Extension churches, 
Avhich were beyond the reach of patrons and cabinets ; while of 
the two classes of Residuaries (and these, for obvious reasons, 
must now be taken together) there are 45. Let these numbers 
be compared with the relative proportions for the previous de- 
cade, and the awful extent of this fearful tampering with con- 
science and the liberties of the Church of God may, it is affirmed, 
be to some extent comprehended. 

There are many other interesting results brought out by these 
Tables ; but space will not permit of their being adverted to, and 
the reader must be left to glean them for himself. The Compiler 
will, in conclusion, merely say that he has been at much pains to 
verify and authenticate the various details which he now presents, 
though he can scarcely hope, in so extensive a field, and where 
his knowledge of individuals was necessarily limited, to have 
altogether escaped errors, nor are they likely to be diminished by 
the necessarily hurried Avay in which these sheets have passed 
through the press. He trusts, hoAvever, that any they may be 
discovered to contain will not be of formidable magnitude. 

J. M'C. 

Warder Office, Dundee, 
10?/; October 1843. 



.^' 




THE WHEAT AND THE CHAFF 

GATHEKED INTO BUNDLES. 

S»notJ of ILotliiatt anU iTbjcetJtialr. 

I. — PRESBYTERY OF EDINBURGH. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

DATt OV 
ORDINATION 

George Muirhead, D.D. Cramond, 1788 
Henry Grey, St Mary's, Edinburgh, 1801 
Thomas Chalmers, D.D., Professor of Divinity in the Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh, 1803 
William Simpson, Leith Wyncl, do. 1813 
Patrick Clason, D.D., Bucdeuch, do. 1815 
Eobert Gordon, D.D., High Church, do. 1816 
John Bruce, St Andrews, do. 1818 
John Glen, Portobello, 1818 
Walter Fairlie, Gihnerton, 1819 
David Welsh, D.D., Professor of Divinity and Church His- 
tory in the Univei-sity of Edinburgh. 1820 
James Julius Wood, Greyfriars, Edinburgh, 1827 
James Buchanan, High Church, do. 1828 
George R. Davidson, Lady Glenorchy's, do. 1828 
Thomas Guthrie, St John's, do. 1830 
William Cunningham, D.D., Trin. Col., do. 1830 
James Begg, Liberton, 1830 
Charles John Brown, New North Kirk, Edinburgh, 1831 
Andrew Mackenzie, Henderson''s Church, do. 1831 
Robert Elder, St PauVs, do. 1831 
William K. Tweedie, Tolbooth Kirk, do. 1832 
James Lewis, St John's, Leith, 1832 



IS LOTIilAX AXD TWRKDDALE. 

John Syni, Old Greyfriars, Edinbiu-ah, 183::? 

David Thorburn, South Lelth, 1833 

Robert Smith Candhsh, D.D., St George's, Edinburgh. 1834 

WiUiam Nisbet, New Street, do. 1834 

Robert Fergusson, St David's, Edinburgh, 1836 

A. Moody Stuart, St Lteke's, do. 1837 

James Fairbairn, Newhavcn, 1838 

James Noble, Gaelic, Edinburgh, 1839 

John Thomson, Mariner's Church, Leith, 1840 

Alexander W. Brown, St Bernard's, Edinburgh, 1841 

Thomas Addis, Morningsiclc, do. 1841 

James Manson, Dean, do. 1842 

Alexander Gregory, Roxhurgh, do. 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Alexander Brunton, D.D., Professor of Oriental Lajngnages 

in the University of Edinburgh, Tron Church, Edinburgh, 1797 
David Ritchie, D.D., St Andrew's, Edinburgh, 1797 
John Gilchrist, D.D., Canongate, do. ' 1807 
Wm. Muir, D.D., LL.D., St Stephen's, do. 1812 
John Hunter, Tron Church, do. 1814 
John Clark, Canongate, do. 1823 
Thomas Clark, D.D., Old Church, do. 1824 
James Grant, D.D., South Leith, 1824 
John Kinross, St Thomas's, Leith, 1842 
John Lee, D.D., Principal and Primarius Professor af Divi- 
nity in the University of Edinburgh, 1807 

Class Second. 
Lewis Balfour, Colinton, 180G 

Did not occupy a very prominent place in the o/ntrovers}-, but always 
professed to belong to the Evangelical party, and uniformly acted with 
them. He M'as in the Assembly of 18:53, and then supported the ad- 
mission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures and motion on calls, 
which in the foUnwing year resulted in the Veto Act. Subsequently 
he supported the Veto itself, and the independence of the Church. He 
was present at the Convocation in November 1842, and adhei-ed to tho 
first series of resolutions.* 

Alexander L. Simpson, D.D., Kirknewton, 1812 

Acquired considerable notoriety for the share he took in originating and 
heading the movement of the " Forty " in 1842, to which so much of 
the subsequent disasters of the Cluirch may be traced. Originally acted 
with the Moderate party, but became the strenuous adherent of the 
Evangelical side from about the era of their rising into a majority. He 

'■' Sco Apiiendix, Nn. 'i. 



i.oTinA.v AXi) twki:dt)A]j:. 19' 

warmly advocated the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and in the earlier stages of the controversy took a consider- 
able share in arousing the attention of the people to a sense of their 
importance. In 1840, he strongly opposed Lord Aberdeen's bill, and in 
the Assembly of that year spoke and voted against it, and continued, up 
to a late period, a member of the General Assembly's Non-intrusion 
Committee. 

John Paul, St Cuthbert's, Edinburgh, 1817 

Long the colleague in the ministry of the late eminent and godly Dr 
Dickson, and, like that good man, uniformly and earnestly maintained 
the cause of Evangelism. He did not profess anti-patronage principles, 
but he opposed Lord Aberdeen's bill, subscribed the declaration against 
it,* and steadily maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence. He was present at the Convocation, but did not adhere 
to either of the series of resolutions. 

Archibald Bennie, Lady Yester's, Edinburgh, 1824 

Throughout belonged to what may be called the extreme section of the 
Evangelical party. He held anti-patronage principles, opposed Lord 
Aberdeen's bill, subscribed the declaration against it, and likewise the 
solemn Engagement in defence of the liberties of the Church. t Gene- 
rally he bore a very marked and prominent share in the agitation in 
behalf of the principles maintained by his party; and, in particular, it 
may be mentioned that he took part in one or more of the series of 
lectures delivered in Edinburgh in elucidation of these principles, and 
afterwards published. Latterly, he gradually drew off; and although 
present at one diet of the Convocation, he did not adhere to either series 
of the resolutions. 

V/ilHam Glover, Greenside, Edinburgh, 1823 

All along a very keen and decided adherent of the Evangelical majority, 
and was, it is said, the very first to raise a public testimony in behalf 
of their principles in the Synod of Galloway previous to his translation 
to Edinburgh. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted in the majority for 
the deposition of the seven Strathbogie recusants, and in favour of the 
measure of non-intrusion introduced by his Grace the Duke of Argyle.J 

D. Runcimaii, Newington, Edinburgh, 1829 

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical party, and supported thern in 

their measures. He voted for the original Independence resolutions 

brought forward by Dr Buchanan of Glasgow in the Assembly of 1838, 

was present at the Convocation, and subscribed both series of resolutions. % 

Robert Jamieson, Currie, 1830 

Never entertained anti-patronage principles, and voted in the minority 
against the anti-patronage resolutions in the Assembly of 1842. He 
always, however, professed himself amongst the most warm and zealous 
assertors of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and bore somewhat of a prominent share in their advocacy. He opposed 
the Earl of Aberdeen's bill, subscribed the solemn Engagement, and in 
the Assembly of 1842 recorded his vote for the memorable Claim of 
Rights. II He attended the Convocation, but adhered to first set of re- 



'■' Sec Appendix, Xo. 1. t Ibid, No. 2. 1 Il>id, N". 

? ] bid, Nos. 5 .and C. \ Ibid Xo. 'i. 



20 LOTHIAN AND TAVEEBDALE, 

solutions only. After the disruption he became a candidate for St 
Mary's, Edinburgh, vacated by his personal friend, the venerable and 
Rev. Henry Grey, and was nominated in the Town Council of Edin- 
burgh for the vacancy. At his nomination a laboured defence of his 
consistency, in the shape of a letter from himself to his proposer in the 
Council, was read, and a discussion followed of a character fitted to be 
anything but soothing to his feelings. Ultimately, he was rejected with- 
out a vote, Mr Learmonth of Dean, amongst others, declaring that, after 
the explanations which had taken place, he could not support him. 

David Home, Corstorphine, 1831 

Did not bear any very prominent share in the proceedings of Church 
Courts, but was a decided and uniform supporter of the Evangelical 
majority, and a steady assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and 
spiritual independence. He attended the Convocation, and subscribed 
the first series of resolutions. 

James Macfarlane, Duddingstone, 1831 

It may be doubted whether he ought not rather to have been placed in 
Class First of the Residuary Presbytery, as he has for years uniformly 
acted and voted with them in all questions of ecclesiastical polity. He 
was, however, at one time, while in St Bernard's Church, Edinburgh, a 
supporter of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and accustomed 
to speak strongly in their behalf. 

J. C. Fowler, Katho, 1833 

Recently translated from St Luke's, Glasgow. Until 1842, he uniformly 
supported the majority. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the 
deposition of the Strathbogie recusants — for the anti-patronage over- 
tures — for the Duke of Argyle's bUl— and the popular election of the 
eldership. In 1842, he was one of the first to connect himself with the 
movement of the Forty ; and shortly thereafter he was presented to 
Ratho. Since then he has, in all vital and important questions, voted 
against his former friends. At present believed that he is to be pre- 
sented to St John's Glasgow, vacated by the Rev. Dr Brown, a man 
from whom he experienced much kindness and friendship. 

James Veitcli, St Cuthbert's, Edinburgli, 1834 

At one time supported the Veto, and professed the principles of non-intru- 
sion and spiritual independence ; but of late years he took but little 
share in the business of Church Courts, and generally, when he did so, 
acted with the Moderates. 



II. — PRESBYTERY OF LINLITHGOW. 

I. FREE CHXTRCH. 

Thomas Gordon, Falkirk, 1819 

Samuel Martin, Bathgate, 1825 

Lewis Hay Irving, Abercorn, 1831 

William M. Hetherington, Torphichen, 1836 

John Laing, assistant and successor, Livingstone, 1842 



LOTHIAN AND TVVEEDDALE. 21 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
James M. Robertson, Livingstone, 1802 

Alexander Davidson, Slamannan, 1810 

Andrew Bell, D,D., Linlithgow, 1S22 

George Boag, Uphall, 1828 

William Walker, Midcalder, 1843 

Class Secund, 
Pavid Fleming, Carriden, 1816 

All along a decided advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spi- 
ritual independence. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the depo- 
sition of the Strathbogie recusants, and for the Duke of Argyle's bill. 
He attended the Convocation, and subscribed the first series of reso- 
lutions. 
Thomas Dimma, Queonsferry, 1820 

A maintainer of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the 
Assembly of 1833 he supported the admission of the chapel ministers, 
and the overtures on calls; and again, in the Assembly of 1841, he 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of 
Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership. 

Kenneth Mackenzie, Borrowstounness, 1824: 

A very ardent professor of the principles of the Evangelical majority, and 
belonging to the extreme section. In 1840, he subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill^ and in the Assembly of 1841 he voted 
in the minority on Dr Cunningham's motion declaring patronage to 
be a grievance and an evil which ought to be abolished, likewise for the 
deposition of the Strathbogie seven, and the Duke of Argyle's bill. He 
attended the Convocation, and subscribed both series of resolutions. 

Graham Mitchell, Whitburn, 1824 

A decided advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence from the first, and active in maintaining them. In the Assem- 
bly of 1832, he supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, he voted 
against Lord Aberdeen's bill. He attended the Convocation, and ad- 
hered to the first series of resolutions. 

John Ker, Polmont, 1825 

A maintainer of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence 
from the outset. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on 
calls; and in 1840, he opposed Lord Aberdeen's bill, and voted for th« 
suspension of the Strathbogie recusants. He never bore any very pro- 
minent share in the controversy. 

Adam Dmican Tait, KirkUston, 1826 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
was especially strong upon the latter. In 1839, he supported Dr 
Chalmers' resolutions, solemnly pledging the Church to maintain the 
principle of non-intrusion at all hazards, notwithstanding the Auchter- 
arder decision. He has long ceased to act with the Evangelical side. 

James Scott, Dalmeny, 1827 

A very zealous professor of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 

and an attender of anti-patronage meetings, though generally voting 

against anti-patronage overtures in Church Courts. In the Assembly 



22 LOTHIAN AND TWEEDDALK. 

of 1832, he supported the oveitures on calls; and in 1840, he opposed 
Lord Aberdeen's bill^ and voted for the suspension of the Strathbogie 
recusants. He was likewise present at the Convocation, and adhered 
to the first series of resolutions. 

James Macfarlane, Muiravonside, 1834 

A keen supporter of the principles of the Evangelical majority. In 1840 
he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill and the 
solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1842, he voted for the anti- 
patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. He adhered to both 
series of the Convocation resolutions ;■ but afterwards, by letter, formally 
withdrew his adherence. 

William Learmontb, West Calder, 1835 

A keen and zealous advocate and propagator • of the principles of the 
Evangelical majority. In 1840, he subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1842, he supported the 
anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. He was present at 
the Convocation, and adhered to both series o/tfic resolutions. 

John Smith, Ecclesmachen, 1836 

A steady supporter of the Evangelical side, and held very decidedly the 

principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but did not take 

any pi-orainent share in their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1840, he 

voted on all questions with the majority. 

William Begg, Falkirk, 1836 

A loud and vehement assertor of the most extreme principles of the 

Evangelical party. In 1840, he subscribed the solemn Engagement, 

Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the reso- 

httions. 

William Bniiiks, Camehu, 1841 

Professing the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 

but cautiously avoiding any forward or decided advocacy of them. Since 

the disruption he has obtained a presentation to the parish of Torphichen. 

Vacant. 

GranganoutJi, 

By the translation of Mr J. W. Taylor to Flisk;^in the Presbytery of Cupar. 

III. PRESBYTERY OF BIGGAR. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

James Proudfoot, Culter, 1827 

William Haniia, Skirling, 1835 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Hamilton Paul, Broughtuii, 1813 

Alexander Craik, D.D., Libbeiton, 1813 

Thomas Watson, Covington and Thankertoii, 1821 

Charles Hope, Wandell and Lamington, 1821 

John Alton, D.D., Dolphington, 1825 

John Wilson, Walston, ' 1825 

John C. Renton, Dunsyre, 1834 

John Forbet!, Symington, 1840 



LOI'HIAN AND TWEEDDALE- 23' 

Class Second, 
J. Christison, Biggar, 1823 

Originally attached himself to the Evangelical side ; and in 18-iO subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, but speedily relapsed into- 
Moderatisra. 



IV. — PRESBYTERY OF PEEBLES. 

L FREE CHURCH. 

James Somerville, D.D., Drumelzier, 17^ 

Creorge Burns, D.D., Tweedsmuir, • 1816 

Walter Paterson, Kirkurd, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 

Alexander Affleck, Lyne and Megget, 1814 

Patrick Eoberston, Eddleston, 1820' 

John Elliot, Peebles, 1825 

Patrick Booth, Innerleithen, 1833 

James Cruickshank, Manor, 1833 

Alexander M, Forrester, West Linton, 1836 

Alexander Edgar, Stobo, 1837 

Class Second- 

James Campbell, Traqnair, 1820 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally supported the Evangelical cause. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and in the Assembly of 1841 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. 

James Charteris, Newlands, 1 834 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally supported th« Evangelical cause. 



V. PRESBYTERY OF DALKEITH. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

David Brown, RosUn, 1829 

Robert Court, Heriot, 1831 

James Menteith, Dalkeith, 1832 

Thomas Pitcairn, assistant and successor, Cockpen, 1833 

James Bannerman, Ormiston. • 1833 



24- LOTHIAN AND TWEEDDALE, 

2. RESIDUAUY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 

James Goldie, Temple, 1789 

James Grierson, M.D., Cockpen, 1814 

Alexander Ton*ence, Glencross, 1818 

J. G. Beveridge, Invei'esk, 1832 

William Muir, assistant and successor, Temple, 1839 

John Crawford. Crichton, 1840 

J, R. Duncan, assistant and successor, Dalkeith, 1&41 

Class Secoyid. 

Alexander Welsh, Cranstown, 1817 

Was a supporter of the Veto, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical 
party for several years after it had become the law of the Church ; but 
when the controversy thickened, he ceased to support them, and on all 
important matters voted with their opponents. 

John Adamson, Newton, 1826 

Was not a supporter of the Church's views in regard to non-intrusion, but 
lield the doctrine of her spiritual independence. He was one of those 
who approved of Lord Aberdeen's bill in 1840. 

James Smith, Borthwick, 1826 

Formerly of the Relief Synod, afterwards of Chalmers' Church, Glasgow. 

Up to the Assembly of 1841, he uniformly acted with the Evangelical 

raajority, and made a high profession of their principles, but, since his 

presentation to Borthwick, has voted as a confirmed Moderate. 

William Scott MoncriefF, Pennicuik, 1830 

Unifonnly acted with the Evangelical party down to a period subsequent 
by some years to the enactment of the Veto, and made a sti'ong profes- 
sion of their principles, but has, during a fewrccent years, as unifonnly 
opposed them. 

^I. C. Mackenzie, Lasswade, 1833 

Throughout the whole of the Church's contendings he maintained the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assem- 
bly of 1833, he supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 1838, 
he voted for Dr Buchanan's Independence resolutions. In 1840, he 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. He was a 
member of Convocation, but did not subscribe either series of the re- 
solutions. 

Bobort Mitchell, Carrington, 1835 

Uniformly and zealously maintained and advocated the principles of non- 
intrusion and spiritual independence, and in 1840 subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and 
adhered to the first series of resolutions, Since the disruption he hns 
obtained and accepted the presentation to the parish of Craig, in the 
Presbytery of Brechin, vacated by the excellent and venerable l>r 
Brewster, 



LOTHIAN AND TWEEDDALE. 25 

Alexander Davidson, Nortliesk, 1839 

Up to about the time of his obtaining a disputed presentation to North Leith, 
-was a uniform and cordial supporter of the Evangelical party, and made 
a very high profession of their principles. Was a member of the As- 
sembly of 1840, and voted with them in every question, including the 
rejection of Lord Aberdeen's bill, and in the autumn of that year sub- 
scribed the solemn Engagement. Since the disruption, has obtained 
undisputed possession of North Leith, one of the richest benefices in the 
Establishment. 

Parishes Vacant. 
Fala and Soutra, 
Newbattle, 
Buccleuch Church, Dalkeith. 



VI. PRESBYTERY OF HADDINGTON, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Robert Lorimer, LL.D., Pladdington, 1793 

Angus Mackellar, D.D., Pencaitland, 1812 

John Abernethy (since dead), Bolton, 1816 

Patrick Fairbairn, Saltoun, 1830 

W. B. Cunningham, Prestonpans, 1833 

John Thomson, Yester, 1834 

John Ainslie, Dirleton, 1835 

Archibald Lorimer, Cockenzie, 1838 

S. 0. Dodds, assistant and successor, Garvald, 1839 

J. W. Wright, St John's, Haddington, 1839 

James Dodds, assistant and successor, Kumbie, 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John Sangster, D.D., Garvald, 1800 

J. Henderson, Tranent, 1806 

James Macfarlane, Humbie, 1811 

John Smith, Aberlady, 1812 

John Ramsay, Gladsmuir, 1812 

James Forsyth, Morham, 1827 

John Cook, Haddington, 1832 

Class Second. 

William Ritchie, Athelstaneford, 1805 

Throughout the -whole controversy, an ardent and zealous partizau of the 

Evangelical majority. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and 

spiritual independence, and -wa* accustomed to speak against patronage, 



26 LOTIIIAX AND TWEEDDALE. 

contending that patrons had no right to compensation^ because they had 
received both the price and the purchase. In tlie Assembly of 1832, sup- 
ported the overtures on calls ; and in that of 1841, voted for the deposi- 
tion of the Strathbogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle's bill, and 
the popular election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, 
and did not adhere to either series of resolutions ; but a short time before 
the disruption, attended a meeting of adhering ministers and elders to 
select the most suitable sites for Free Churches and preaching stations, 
and made some suggestions as to the latter. 

R. Balfour Graham, North Berwick, 1814 

A strenuous and active maintainer of the principles of non-intrusion and 
spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the Veto 
and the Chapel Act ; and in that of 1838, voted for Dr Buchanan's Inde- 
pendence resolutions. Volunteered his attendance with the Presbytery 
of Dunkeld to the bar of the Court of Session, when rebuked for breach 
of interdict. In 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first 
series of resolutions. 



VII. — PRESBYTERY OF DUNBAR. 

I . FREE CHURCH. 

Adam Forman, Innerwick, 1824 

John Thomson, Prestonkirk, 1831 

Andrew Baird, assistant and successor, Cockburnspath, 1831 

WilHam Sorley, Belhaven, 1840 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Andrew Spence, Cockburnspath, 1789 

Robert Moore, Oldhamstocks, ^ 1797 

James Wallace, D.D., Whitekirk, ' 1802 

John Lumsden, Whittingham, 1804 

John Jaffray, Dunbar, - 1821 

Class Second. 

David Logan, Stenton, 1817 

From the first a steady adherent of the Evangelical party. In the As- 
sembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls; and in 1840, subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the Assembly of 1842, 
he voted for the rejection of the commission from the deposed Strathbogie 
recusants, for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. 
Was a member of the Convocation, and adhered to the first series of 
resolutions . 

Robert Bui'ns Thomson, Spott, 1834 

Always professed to maintain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence, and uniformly acted with the Evangelical party up to 
the Convocation, which he did not attend. 



LOTHIAN AND TWEEDDALE. 



27 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF LOTHIAN ANJ) TWEEDDALE. 





FREE CHURCH. 








Presbytery 


of Edinburgh, ministers seceding," 
Linlithgow, „ 

Peebles, 
Dalkeith, 

Haddington, „ 
Dunbar, „ 




34 
5 
2 
3 
5 
. 11 
4 




Total of Free Church ministers iu Synod^ 




64 




The above total comprises— 








I. Ministers of endowed parishes, 






42 




,, of unendowed do. 

KESJDUARY ESTAULISUMENT. 






22 

64 




c 


LASS ISX. 


Class •. 


D. 


Presbytery 


of Edinburgh, ministers adhering, 


10 


11 




„ 


Linlithgow, „ 


. 5 


12 




„ 


Biggar, 


8 


I 




^j 


Peebles, „ 


. 7 


2 




■ 


Dalkeith, 


7 


7 




„ 


Haddington, „ 


• 7 


2 




. 


Dunbar, „ 


5 


2 






Total of each Class, 


49 


37 
49 





Total of adhering ministers, 



The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, Class I, 
Class 2, 



2. Ministers of unendowed parishes, Class 1, 
Class 2, 



Vacant Parishes. 



Presbytery of Linlithgow, 
Dalkeith, 



86 



28 MERSK AXD TEVIOTDALK. 

SynotJ of MtXM mti CTfUiotUale. 

Vlll. — PRESBYTERY OF DUNSE. 

1. FREE CHUaCH. 

John Brown, D.D., Langton, 1805 

Archibald M'Conechy, Bunkle and Preston, 1819 

John Wallace, Abbey St Bathans, 1323 

John Fairbairn, West Church, Greenlaw, 1833 

WilUam Cousin, Boston Church, Dunse, 1840 

John Bailhe, Fogo, 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

George Cunningham, Dunse, 1797 

Abraham Home, Greenlaw, 1799 

James Thomson, D.D., Eccles, 1805 

Walter Home, Polwarth, 1823 

Class Second. 

James Hope Sibbald, Cranshaws, 1813 
Uniformly acted with the Evangelical party — was a member of Convoca- 
tion, and subscribed both series of resolutions. 

Henry Riddel, Longformacus, 1830 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and in 1840 voted in the majority for the suspension of the Strathbogie 
ministers. 

IX. PRESBYTERY OF CHIRNSIDE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Turnbull, Eyemouth, 1822 

John Fulton Knight, Mordington, 1832 

Robert Cowie, Whitsome, 1832 

2, RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John Edgar, Hutton, 1810 

Alexander Christison, Foulden, 1821 

A. Cuthbertson, Edrom, 1823 

Thomas Smith Goldie, Coldstream, 1830 

James Logan, Swinton, 1833 

A. W. Corkindale, Ladykirk, 1842 



MERSE AND TEVIOTDALE. 29 

Class Second. 
James H. Robertson, Coldlnghame, 1827 

Professed the principles of spiritual independence and non-intrusion, but 
never very active or forward in maintaining them. Generally suj)- 
ported the Evangelical side when he took part in the business of Church 
Courts, which was seldom. 

Daniel Cameron, Ayton, 1836 

Translated during the piesent year from BridgegaU, Glasgow, on the pre- 
sentation of the Crown. Up to 1842, a very decided and thorough-going 
assertor of Evangelical principles. Professed strongly the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and in 1840 subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was one of the first to join 
the movement of the Forty, and, like a number more of the same party, 
speedily obtained preferment at the hands of the Government. 

John Robertson, Houndwood, 1838 

For a time a cautious and hesitating assertor of the principles of Evan- 
gelism — latterly a confirmed Moderate. 

James Wilson, Chirnside, 1838 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but 
not particularly zealous in maintaining them. Generally supported the 
Evangelical cause when he took part in the business of Church Courts, 
which he was cautious in doing. Latterly inclined towards the Mode- 
rates, and after the Stewarton decision, voted with them for the exclu- 
sion of the quoad sacra brethren. 



X. — PRESBYTERY OF KELSO. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

George Craig, SprOuston, 1835 

Horatius Bonar, North Parish, Kelso, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

William Faickney, Linton, 1805 

David Hogarth, Makerston, 1807 

Joseph Thomson, Ednam, 1819 

David Hope, Roxbm-gh, 1819 

Peter Buchanan, Stitchel, 1827 

Class Second. 
Walter Morlson, Morebattle, 1807 

A very decided advocate of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 
1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and uni- 
formly acted with the Evangelical party, and supported them in all their 
measures, so long as they remained in the Establishment, refusing to 
join in the movement of the Forty. 



.so MERSR AND TEYIOTDALE. 

James Melville M'Culloch, D.D., Kelso, 1829 

Originally a keen partizan of the extreme section of tlie Evangelical sidp, 
and during the first years of the controversy bore a prominent share in 
its public agitation, presiding at or otherwise taking part in non-intru- 
sion meetings, &c. In the Assembly of 1833, lie supported the ad- 
mission of the Chapel Ministers and the overtures on calls. In that of 
1836, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Afterwards he took a 
leading and active shai"e in originating and carrying forward the un- 
happy movement of the Forty. Subsequently to the disruption ho 
was proposed in the Edinburgh Town Council for St Mary's, Edinburgh, 
but his election was strongly opposed by a large section of the Council, 
and he was most unpleasantly handled in the course of the discussion 
which followed. Ultimately he was elected by a small majority, but 
declined the presentation. Has now obtained and accepted the pre- 
sentation to the West Church, Greenock, the richest benefice in the 
Establishment. 

John Baird, Yetholm, 1829 

A very keen and decided maintainor of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and inclining broadly to anti-patronage views. He sub- 
scribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill in 1840, and up to 
the movement of the Forty, to which he became a party, uniform!}^ 
acted with the Evangelical side. 

John Gifford, Nenthorn, 1832 

Originally a keen adherent of the Evangelical side, and a zealous professor 
of anti-patronage principles. In the Assembly of 1833, he supported 
the admission of the Chapel Ministers, the overtures on calls, and the 
anti-patronage resolutions. In that of 1838, he voted for the Indepen- 
dence resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Loid 
Aberdeen's bill. As matters grew more serious he gradually drew off; 
and in the Assembly of 1842, he voted against the anti-patronage reso- 
lutions, and did not support the Claim of Rights. He became one of 
the Fortv. 



XI. PRESBYTERY OF JEDBURGH. 

1. FREF. CHURCH. 

John A. Wallace, Hawick, - 1827 

Andrew Milroy, Crailing, 1829 

John Purvos, Jedburgh, 1880 

2. RESIDUARY liSTABLISHMENT. 

C/a.^s First. 

John Richmond, Southdean, " 1810 

George B. Rutherford, Hownani, 1818 

David Stevenson, Wilton. . 1826 

David Aitken, Minto, 1827 

John Paton, Ancrum, 1830 

James Wright, Oxnam, 1830 

A. Grav, Bednde, 1832 



MKUSF, AND TEVlOTlJALi;. 31 

John Eu-on, Ilr.pekirk, 1834 

William S. Martin, Kirkton, 1834 

William Grant, Cavers, 1840 

Class Second. 

Joseph Yair, Eckford, 1829 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
but was very far from being active or zealous in their advocacy. In 
Church Courts generally extended a cautious support to the measures of 
the Evangelical side. 



XII. PRESBYTERY OF LAUDER. 

1. FREE CTIUKCII. 

Walter Wood, Wcstruther, 1838 

2. KESIDUARY ESTAHLISIIMENT. 

Claa.^ Firgt. 
James Duncan, Mertoun, 1790 

Thomas Cleghorn, Sniailholm, 1796 

James Patcrson, Gordon, 1824 

Class Srroii'l. 
David W. Gordon, Earlston, 1807 

Professed anti-patronage principles — a uniform supporter of the Evangeli- 
cal side. 

Peter Cosens, Lander, 1810 

A steady and active supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly 
of 1834, supported the Veto, and the admission of the Chapel Ministers. 
In 1840, signed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, was a 
member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

James Rutherford, Channelkirk, 1826 

Professed tlie principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. A 
genei-al but cautious supporter of the Evangelical side, taking by no 
means a prominent share in the controversy. 

John H. Walker, Lcgerwood, 1834 

Maintained the principles of non-intrasion and spiritual independence, 
and steadily supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1838, 
voted for the Independence resolutions; and in that of 1841, for the 
anti-patronage resolutions, the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, 
and the Duke of Argyle's bill. Afterwards evinced symptoms of halt-- 
ing, though giving it to be understood that he would not remain in the" 
Establishment in the event of the Evangelical party being driven out. 
David Waddel, Stow, 1841 

A keen adherent of the Evangelical party, holding the principles of the 
extreme section, and extending an unflinching support to all their 
measures. In the Assembly of 1842, supported the anti-patronage 
resolutions and the Claim of Rights, was a member of Convocation, 
and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 



32 MERSE AND TEVIOTDALE. 

XIII. PRESBYTERY OF SELKIRK. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Thomas Jolly, Bowden, 1829 

John Edmonstone, Ashkirk, 1837 

WiUiam P. Falconer, Ladhope, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Clms First. 

John Campbell, Selkirk, 1806 

John Thomson, Maxton, 1810 

George Ritchie, St Boswell's, 1834 

William Murray, Meb-ose, 1836 

James Russell, assistant and successor, Yarro\v, 1841 

Adam Gourlay, Lillieslcaf, 1842 

Clas? Second. 

Robert Russell, D.D., Yarrow, 1790 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
in the Assembly of 1832 supported the overtui-es on calls. Throughout 
a long incumbency steadily acted with the Evangelical party, though 
not taking any active or prominent share in the more recent struggles. 

Alexander Nivison, Roberton, 1820 

Originally supported the Evangelical side, and in 1840 subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, but speedily relapsed into 
Moderatism. 

James Smith, Ettrick, 1823 

Professed to belong to the Evangelical party, and supported the Veto. Has 
for several years back been gradually drawing off from them. 

Kenneth Macleay Phin, Galashiels, 1841 

Previous to obtaining a Crown presentation to' Galashiels was one of the 
most active and vehement advocates of the principles of the Evan- 
gelical side, and is reported to have entertained extreme anti-patronage 
views ; but since his settlement in that parish-he has usually acted and 
voted with the Moderates. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF MERSE AND TEVIOTDALE. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Dunse, ministers seceding, ... 6 

Chirnside, „ . . . .3 

Kelso, „ ... 2 

Jedburgh, „ . . . .3 

Lauder, „ ... I 

Selkirk, „ .... 3 

Total Free Church ministers in Svnod, . . 18 



DUMFRIES. 



33 



The above number comprises — 

Ministers of old or endowed parishes, 
Do. of unendowed do. 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 



Presbytery of Dunse, ministers adhering, 

Chirnside, 

Kelso, 

Jedburgh, 

Lauder, 

Selkirk, 



Total in each Class, 





14 




4 




— 18 


Class 1st. 


Class 2d. 


4 


2 


. 6 


4 


5 


4 


. 10 


1 


3 


5 


. 6 


4 


34 


20 




34 



Together, 

The above number comprises — 

1. Ministers of old or endowed parishes, Class 1st, 

Class 2d, 



2. Minister of unendowed parish. Class 2d, 

Parishes vacant — None. 



SsnoO of Bumfrtes. 



XIV. — PRESBYTERY OF LOCHMABEN. 



1. FREE CHURCH. 



D. B. Douie, Diyfesdale, 



2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Cla^s First. 
Jacob Wright, Hutton, 
Andrew Jameson, St Mungo, 
William Dunbar, D.D., Applegarth, 
Thomas Little, Tundergarth, 
T. H. Thomson, Dalton, 
Andrew B. Murray, Mousewald, 
Thomas Marjoribanks, Lochmaben, 
Hugh Dobie, Kirkmichael, 
William Little, Kirkpatrick-juxta, 



1831 



1799 
1803 
1807 
1822 
1823 
1825 
1834 
1835 
1841 



34 DUMFRIES. 

Class Second. 

Alexandei' Johnston, Moffat, 1792 

Throughout a long incumbency a very zealous and decided supporter of 
Evangelical principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill. Has of late years been much weighed down by the 
pressure of years and infirmities. 

Robert Colvin, D.D., Johnstone, 1809 

A very decided and active supporter of the Evangelical side. In the As- 
sembly of 1834, he voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel 
ministers, and in 1840 subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill. In the Assembly of 1842, he supported the rejection of the com- 
mission from the deposed Strathbogie recusants and the Claim of Rights. 
Did not maintain anti-patronage views, and was not a member of Con- 
vocation. 

Charles Dickson, Wamphray, 1825 

A very decided and active partizan of the Evangelical side. In the As- 
sembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers and the 
overtures on calls; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both 
series of resolutions. 



XV. PRESBYTERY OF LANGHOLM. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

William Brown Clark, Half-Morton, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

William Berry Shaw, Langholm, 1801 

Robert Shaw, Ewes, ' 1807 

James Donaldson, Canonbie, 1815 

Angus Barton, Castleton, . 1822 

Adam Cunningham, Eskdalemuir, 1836 

William B. Dunbar, Westerkirk, 1842 
Class Second. 
None. 



XVI. — PRESBYTERY OF ANNAN. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Henry Duncan, D.D., Ruthwell, 1799 

George Hastie, Kirkpatrick-Fleming, 1834 

Hugh M'Bryde Broun, Biydckirk, 1836 



DUMFRIES. 35 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Richard Nivison, Middlebie, 1820 

James Monilaws, Annan, 1821 

James Roddick, Gi'aitney, 1828 

Robert Menzies, Hoddam, 1834 

Class Second. 

Nicholas, Sloan, Dornock, 1797 
Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally acted with the Evangelical side. 

William B. Nivison, Kirtle, 1818 

Originally acted with the Evangelical side, and maintained their prin- 
ciples. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill, but speedily relapsed into Moderatism. 

Geoi'ge Gillespie, Cumbertrees, 1828 

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the 
Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls, and uniformly acted 
with the Evangelical side, 

William Wyper, New Church, Annan, 1838 

Originally connected with the Independent body ; but circumstances having 
occurred to detach him from it, his case was warmly taken up by Dr 
Duncan, the Free Church minister of Ruthwell, by whose instrumen- 
tality he was received into the Establishment, and large contributions 
towards his place of worship made by the Evangelical party. Since 
the disruption he has been preaching in the Presbytery of Cupar, in Dun- 
dee, and elsewhere throughout the country where vacancies existed, and 
has ultimately succeeded ,in securing a call from some residuum of a 
congregation about Paisley. 



XVII. — PRESBYTERY OF DUMFRIES. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Robert Brydon, Dunscore, 1822 

George John Duncan, Kirkpatrick-Durham, 1832 

Robert Crawford, Kirkpatrick-Irongray, 1832 

Robert Kinnear, Torthorwald, 1841 

J. R. Mackenzie, St Mary's, Dumfries, 1841 

James Mackenzie, Dalbeattie, 1843 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

William Thorburn, Troqueer, 1792 

J. Wightman, D.D., Kirkmahoe, 1797 

Thomas Tudor Duncan, D.D., New Kirk, Dumfries, 1804 

Thomas Inglis, Lochrutton, 1806 

John Crockatt, Kirkgunzeon, 1809 



36 ^ DUMFRIES. 

Andrew Maculloch, Colvend, 1812 

James Hamilton, New Abbey, 1813 

George Heron, Terregles, 1815 

Robert Wallace, D.D., St Michael's, Dumfries, 1818 

T. Grierson, Kirkbean, 1824 

George Greig, Tinwald, 1830 

Robert Gillies, Caerlaverock, 1833 

D. Dickie, assistant and successor, Terregles, 1837 

J. Wilson, assistant and successor, Kirmahoe, 1841 

Class Second. 
Andrew Fyfe, Dumfries, 1807 

A constant supporter of the Evangelical side, and made a high profession 
of their principles. A member of the Convocation, and subscribed both 
series of the resolutions. 

Robert Kii'kwood, Holy wood, 1821 

Maintained the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
was throughout, up to the very last, a zealous and active partizan of the 
Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures 
on calls J and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strath- 
bogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election 
of the eldership. He was a member of Convocation, and subscribed both 
series of the resolutions ; and, -when the Moderate majority in the Pres- 
bytery resolved, after the Stewarton decision, to eject the quoad sacra 
brethren from their seats, he was one of the minority who withdrew to 
form a separate Presbytery, in which he moderated. 

George Macknight Burnside, Urr, 1823 

Originally somewhat prominent in his avowal of the principles of non- 
intrusion and spiritual independence, but latterly drew considerably 
back in his maintenance of them. 

James Ranken, Maxivellton, ' 1834 

A keen partizan of the Evangelical majority, making a strong profession 
of their principles. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill, was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both 
series of resolutions, but afterwards formally withdrew his subscription 
by letter. 



XVIII. — PRESBYTERY OF PENPONT. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Patrick Bon-owman, Glencairn, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 
George Wallace, Durrisdeer, 1817 

George Smith, Penpont, 1824 



DUMFRIES. 37 

John Murray, Morton, 1826 

Robert Wilson, Tynron, 1828 

Class Second, 
Thomas Montgomery, Sanquhar, 1821 

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the doctrines of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, in the Assembly of 1838, 
voted for the Independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declara- 
tion agaiust Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and 
adhered to both series of resolutions. 

William Menzies, Keir, 1827 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 

uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. In the Assembly 

of 1840, he voted against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and in favour of the 

suspension of the Strathbogie recusants, 

Andrew Bennet, Closeburn, 1830 

A keen, active, and zealous professor of the principles of the extreme sec- 
tion of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1836, he supported the 
anti-patronage resolutions ; in 1840, subscribed the declaration agains' 
Lord Aberdeen's bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, he voted for th( 
deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle's bill, anc 
the popular election of the eldership. He was a member of Convoca- 
tion, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

Parish Vacant at Disruption. 
Kirkconnell. 

GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF DUMFRIES. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Lochmaben — Ministers seceding, ... 1 

„ Langholm, „ .... 1 

„ Annan, „ .... 3 

„ Dumfries, „ .... 6 

„ Penpont, „ .... 1 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, . . 12 

The above number comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, 9 

2. ,, of unendowed do 3 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 



'tery of Lochmaben— Ministers adhering, 
„ Langholm, „ 
„ Annan, „ 
„ Dumfries, „ 
„ Penpont, „ 


Class 1st. 

9 
. 6 

4 
. 14 

4 


CLASS 2J>. 

3 


4 
4 
3 


Total of each Class, . 


. 37 


14 
37 


Total of adhering ministers. 




51 



38 GALLOWAY. 

The above number comprises — 

1 . Ministers of old or endowed parishes, Class 1, . 37 

„ „ Class 2, . 10 

— 47 

2. „ of unendowed parishes, Class 2, . 4 

51 

Vacant Parishes. 
Presbytery of Penpont, 1 



SgnoO of (^allotoai?. 



XIX. — PRESBYTERY OF STRANRAER. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Lamb, Kirkmaiden, 1826 

Andrew Urquhart, Port-Patrick, 1832 

Robert M'Neil, Stony kirk, 1840 

Thomas B. Bell, assistant and successor, Leswalt, 1841 

Hobert Donald, Sheuchan, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

William Rose, Kirkcolm, 1795 

Andrew M'Cubbin, Leswalt, 1798 

William M'Kergo, New Luce, 1811 

Thomas Blair, Colmonell, 1816 

John Macdowall, Old Luce, ♦ 1821 

John Milroy, Ballantrae, 1830 

Class Second. 
James Ferguson, Inch, 1822 

A keen, zealous, and indefatigable partizan of the Evangelical side, and 
the leader of his party in the Presbytery. In 1840, he subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the Assembly of 1841, he 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, was a member of 
the Convocation, and adhered to both scries of resolutions. Subsequently 
to the disruption he permitted himself to be put forward as a candidate 
for St George's, Glasgow, but, finding that he was likely to encounter 
formidable opposition on the ground of his former professions, he deemed 
it advisable to withdraw. 

Parish Vacant. 
Stranraer, 

By the deposition of David Wilson, since restored by the Residuary As- 
sembly in submission to the Civil Courts. 



GALLOWAY. 39 

XX. — PRESBYTERY OF WIGTOWN. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

A. Forrester, assistant and successor, Sorby, 1835 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Elliot W. Davidson, Sorby, 1789 

Anthony Stewart, M.D., Kirkowan, 1792 

Peter Young, Wigtown, 1799 

Christopher Nicholson, Whithorn, 1811 

Samuel Clanaghan, Glasserton, 1813 

James Reid, Kirkinner, 1816 

Alexander Young, Mochrum, 1822 

S. Richardson, Penninghame, 1825 

Class Second. 

John Muir, Kirkmabreck, 1834 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
was very active and zealous in promoting them. In the Assembly of 
1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke 
of Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Was a 
member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

Michael Stewart Johnstone, Minnigaff, 1836 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, also 
held anti-patronage sentiments, and -was very keen and active in ad- 
vancing his views. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of 
the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular 
election of the eldership. Did not attend the Convocation, but gave it 
to be understood that it was not his intention to remain in the Esta- 
blishment in the event of a disruption. 



XXI. — PRESBYTERY OF KIRKCUDBRIGHT. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Robert Jeffrey, Girthon, 1818 

Sanmel Smith, Borgue, 1834 

John M'MiUan, Kirkcudbright, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Alexander Crosbie, Buittle, 1808 

James Thomson, Rerrick, 1818 

Gavin Cullen, Balmaclellan, 1825 



40 GALLOWAY. 

James Maitland, Kells, 1826 

Dugald S. Williamson, Tongland, 1832 

John Gordon, Twynholm, 1835 

George Paterson, Dairy, 1836 

George Murray, assistant and successor, Balmaclellan, 1838 

Samuel Cowan, Kelton, 1839 

Class Second. 

David Welsh, Carsphairn, 1822 

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uni- 
formly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the Assembly of 1841, 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the popular 
election of the eldership. Was a member of Convocation, but did not 
subscribe to either series of the resolutions. 

W. G. Crosbie, Parton, 1830 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. 

Alexander Gibson, Balmaghie, 1831 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. 

John Whitson, M.D., Crossmichael, 1837 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1838, 
voted for the Independence resolutions; and, in 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the Assembly' of 1842, voted 
for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did not 
adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

Thomas Johnston, Anwoth, 1839 

Maintained the principles of no.n-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and uniformly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF GALLOWAY. 

FREK CHUKCH. 

Presbytery of Stranraer — Ministers seceding, ... 5 
„ Wigtown, „ .... 1 

„ Kirkcudbright, „ ... 3 



Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, 

2. ,, of unendowed do.. 



GLASC40W AND AYR. 41 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 
Presbytery of Stranraer — Ministers adhering, . . 6 1 

Wigtown, ,. ..82 

„ Kirkcudbright, „ ..95 



Total of each Class, . . 23 



23 



Total of adhering ministers, 31 

The above are all ministers of endowed parishes. 
Vacant. 
Presbytery of Stranraei-, 1 



S^moti of ©lasgoU) atttj ^gr. 



XXII. — PRESBYTERY OF AYR 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Ebenezei- Bradshaw Wallace, Barr, 1819 

Thomas Bums, Monkton, 1826 

Ninian Bannatyne, Old Cumnock, 1830 

Matthew Kirkland, New Cumnock, 1835 

William Chalmers, Dailly, 1836 

James Stevenson, Newton-on-Ayr, 1836 

William Hutchison, Catrine, 1836 

Andrew Thomson, Maybole, 1840 

Geoi'ge Orr, assistant and successor, Symington, 1840 

John Spiers, Patna, 1841 

William Grant, Wallacetoiun, 1843 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Robert Auld, D.D., Ayr, 1800 

Peter M'Master, Girvan, 1803 

John Tod, Mauchline, 1804 

John Stirling, D.D., Craigie, 1806 

James Inglis, Kirkoswald, " 1806 

Thomas S, Wharrie, Symington, 1809 

Alexander Cuthill, Ayr, ' 1814 

Robert Stirling, D.D., Galston, 1816 

William Rorison, Stair, 1818 



42 C4LASG0W AND AYR. 

Stair M'Quhae, D.D., St Quivox, 1820 

Robert Wallace, Dalrymple, 1829 

David Ritchie, Tarbolton, 1829 

John M'Ewen, Kirkmichael, 1835 

James Porteous, Riccarton, 1837 

Andrew Willison, Dundonald, 1841 

Class Second. 

James Boyd, Ochiltrees, 1818 
Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence A uni- 
form and active supporter of the Evangelical side. 

John Stewart, Sorn, 1823 

In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the chapel act, and was 
throughout the whole controversy a loud and vehement assertor of the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and strenuous in 
his efforts to promote them. Before the disruption became a strong 
advocate for the repeal of the veto, and after it obtained a presentation 
to the wealthy parish of Liberton, in the Presbytery of Edinburgh, 
vacated, for conscience sake, by the Rev. James Begg. It was the first 
Crown presentation laid on any Presbytery table after the disruption. 

Robert Paton, Straiton, 1824 

A strong assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and a leader in his presbytery on the Evangelical side. In 
the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and, in that of 
1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, 
but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

Alexander Duncan, Coylton, 1826 

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto, and held the principles of 

non-intrusion and spiritual independence — ^^the latter very strongly. 

Uniformly supported the Evangelical side, but became one of the Forty. 

James Symington, Muirkirk, 1832 

A uniform and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side. In the Assem- 
bly of 1833 recorded his vote for the overtures on calls and the admission 
of the chapel ministers ; in that of 1838, for the independence resolu- 
tions; and in that of 1842, for the Claim of Rights. 

James Chijstal, Auchinleck, 1833 

Uniformly voted with the Evangelical party, supporting the veto and 
spiritual independence, but taking little of a prominent or active share 
in business. 

Robert Houst n, Dalmellington, 1833 

A zealous and active partizan of the Evangelical side, belonging to the 
extreme section. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the 
chapel act; in that of 1836, voted for the anti -patronage resolutions; 
and in that of 1842, for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim 
of Rights. 

James Fleming, Troon, 1837 

A strenuous supporter of the Evangelical side, maintaining the doctrines 
of spiritual independence and non-intrusion. Was a member of Con- 
vocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 



GLASGOW AND AYR. 43 

James Fairlie, assistant and successor, Mauchllne, 1838 

A strenuous maintainer of the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritual in- 
dependence, and a constant supporter of the Evangelical side. In the 
Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights — was a member of Con- 
vocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Before the dis- 
ruption had a site for a Free Church actually selected, under his own 
immediate direction, and went to Edinburgh, as was understood, for the 
purpose of demitting. 

James Smellie, Crosshill, 1841 

Held very decidedly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence. 
Adam Hall, Fisherton, 1842 

Was understood to entertain anti-patronage sentiments, but careful not to 
commit himself in Church Courts. 



XXIII. — PRESBYTERY OF IRVINE. 

1 . FREE CHURCH. 

David Landsboi'ough, Stevenston, 1811 

Peter Campbell, Henderson Church, Kilmarnock, 1815 

Mathew Dickie, Dunlop, 1828 

Thomas Findlay, West Kilbride, 1832 

David Wilson, FuUarton, 1837 

John Hamilton, Saltcoats, 1838 

Thomas Main, High Church, Kilmarnock, 1 839 

Neil Brodie, St Andrew's, do. 1842 

David Arthur, New Church, Stewarton, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Robert Urquhart, Kilbirnie, 1795 

Thomas Johnston, Dairy, 1809 

George Colville, Beith, 1824 

Archibald B. Campbell, Kilwinning, 1828 

John Bryce, Ardrossan, 1830 

J. C. Jamieson, Dreghorn, 1836 

Norman M'Leod, Loudoun, 1838 

William Sinclair, Kilmaurs, 1840 

Class Second. 

John Wilson, D.D., Irvine, 1813 

Long a zealous and active partizan of the Evangelical side, and an as- 
pirant to leadership in the Presbytery. Cherished extreme anti-pa- 
tronage sentiments when there were comparatively few to favour 
them. Of late years has acted entirely with the Moderates. 



44 C4LA,SG0\V AND AYR. 

C. B. Steven, Stewarton, 1825 

Held anti-patronage sentiments, and altogether may be placed very much 
in the same category as Dr Wilson. 

David Strong, first minister of Low Church, Kilmarnock, 1833 

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel 
ministers ; but, when the controversy began to run high, grew cautious in 
his support of the Evangelical side, and, though he often seemed to fa- 
vour them in his speeches in the Presbytery, his vote was generally 
against them. Since the disruption has obtained a presentation to the 
parish of Dailly, vacated by a faithful minister. 

Vacant at Disruption. 
Parish of Fenwick. 

Second Charge of Low Church, Kilmarnock. 
St MarnocK's Church, do. 



XIV. — PRESBYTERY OF PAISLEY. 

1 . FREE CHURCH. 

George Logan (now deceased), Eastwood, 1785 

Robert Burns, D.D., Laigh Kirk, Paisley, 1811 

Robert Smith, Lochwinnoch, 1815 

William Scott Hay, Bridge of Weir, 1821 

Duncan Macfarlane, Renfrew, 1827 

John M'Naughtan, High Church, Paisley, 1831 

John Campbell, Gaelic Church, do. 1833 

Alexander Salmon, Barrhead, 1836 

James Falconer, Blartyrs' Church, Paisley, 1837 

Peter Henderson, South Church, do. ^ 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Alexander Fleming, D.D., Neilston, 1804 

Laurence Lockhai't, Inchinnan, 1822 

Thomas Brydsone, Levern, 1839 

Alexander Stewart, Elderslie, 1841 

Class Second 

Robert Douglas, Kilbarchan, 1802 
Professed to entertain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, but never very forward or zealous in their behalf. 

Robert Macnair, D.D., Abbey, Paisley, 1815 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, 

in the earlier stages of the controversy, lectured in several parishes on 

the subject. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 



GLASGOW AND AYR. 45 

deen's bill. Latterly has acted zealously and uniformly with the Mo- 
derates. 

Patrick Brewster, Abbey, Paisley, 1818 

A leader amongst the moral force Chartists, and under libel on the charge 
of preaching seditious sermons. Did not hold the doctrine of spiritual 
independence, and could not be said to be allied to the Evangelical side 
by anything more than his opposition to patronage, which, on his part, 
was probably as much of a political as a religious principle. 

John Eeid, Johnstone, 1829 

Came into the Establishment along with the Old Light Burgher Synod, 
whom he had joined shortly before. Was a keen opponent of patron- 
age, and a general, though not a very consistent or uniform, supporter 
of the Evangelical side. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered 
to the first series of resolutions. 

R. 0. Bromfield, Auldjidd, 1833 

Professed to entertain the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, but very in-egular and uncertain in his support of the Evan- 
gelical side. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the 
Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle's bill. Since the disrup- 
tion has obtained a presentation to the parish of Sprouston, vacated by 
a seceding minister. 

Donald Mackellar, Mearns, 1834 

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Maintained the doctrines of 
spiritual independence and non-intrusion, and, in the Assembly of 1841, 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and^the Duke of 
Argyle's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered i!o both scries 
of resolutions. 

Robert Stevenson, Middle Church, Paisley, 1835 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
was a member of a non-intrusion association. In 1840, subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and, in the Assembly of 1842, 
voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but did 
not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

James Graham, North Church, Paisley, 1836 

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence, and was a member of a non-intrusion association. In 
the Assembly of 1 840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill and the solemn Engagement. In the Assembly of 1842 
voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a 
member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of resolutions. 
Vacant. 
Houston, 
By demise of Dr Menteith. 



XXV. — PRESBYTERY OF GREENOCK. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Patrick Macfarlane, D.D., West Parish, Greenock, 1806 

Angus Macbean, South Church, do. 1821 

James Smith, Middle Kirk, do. 1824 



46 GLASGOW AND AYR. 

James Drummond, Cunibraes, 1830 

John Dow, Largs, 1831 

Donald M'Leod, Gourock, 1831 

James Stark, Cartsdyke, Greenock, 1834 

John Gemmel, Fairlie, 1835 

John James Bonar, St Andrews, Greenock, 1835 

Robert W. Stewart, Erskme, 1837 

William Laughton, St Thomas, Greenock, 1839 

James Morison, Newark, Port Glasgow, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Thomas Brown, Innerkip, 1822 

William Menzies, East Kirk, Greenock, 1826 

Class Second. 
James Barr, D.D., Port Glasgow, 1815 

From ihe outset of his incumbency an ardent, zealous, and conspicuous 
partizan of the extreme section of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly 
of 1835, he voted in favour of the chapel act, the veto act, and against 
the settlement of Youn^, the presentee to Auchterarder ; and in 1840 
he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the earlier 
stages of the controversy he frequently took part in public meetings, 
and spoke strongly against patronage and in support of the spiritual in- 
dependence of the Church. Declares his sentiments to be now in all 
respects the same as ever they were, but has latterly used the platform 
and the press against his former party with at least as much zeal as ever 
he did in support of them. Since the disruption, has been presented to 
St Enoch's, Glasgow, vacated by a seceding minister. 

Nathaniel Morren, North Kirk, Greenock, 1823 

Professed anti-patronage principles, and uniformly acted with the Evan- 
gelical side. When the controversy began perceptibly to wax toAvards 
a crisis, became less forward in their support, and latterly assailed his 
former friends from the pulpit, with some smartness and much bitter- 
ness, in a series of discourses, afterwards published under the title of 
" My Church Politics, or Letters to my People," &c. In one of these 
letters he nevertheless declares it to be his determination to quit the Es- 
tablishment, if the decisions of the Civil Courts should be submitted to 
by the Church. A fitting commentary on this declaration is his presen- 
tation by the Crown, since the disruption, to the first charge of Brechin. 

Vacant. 
Kilmacolm. 



XXVI. — PRESBYTERY OF HAMILTON, 
1. FREE cmrRCH. 

vTamcs Clason, Dalziel, 1808 

William Buchan, Hamilton, 1831 



GLASGOW AND AYR. 47 



1832 



James Anderson, Blantyre, 

William Jackson, West Parish, Airdrie, 1835 

James Findlay, Broomknoll, 1836 

Henry Moncrieff, East Kilbride, 1836 

David Paton, Chapelton, 1841 

Alexander Rankine, East Strathaven, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
James Craig, Dalserf, 1805 

James Gray Wood, Oartsherrie, 1839 

Thomas Waddell, Larkhall, 1841 

John Johnstone, Old Monkland, 1842 

Class Second. 

James Begg, D.D., New Monkland. 1794 

Throughont his long incumbency a constant and forward supporter of the 

Evangelical side, holding anti-patronage sentiments, and belonging to 

the extreme section. In the Assemby of 1834, he supported the veto, 

and tire admission of the chapel ministers, and, in 1840, subscribed the 

declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and the solemn Engagement. 

In the Assembly of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions 

and the Claim of Rights. 

Matthew Gardiner, D.D., Bothwell, 1802 

All along a warm supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the prin- 
ciples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and took a lead in 
the Presbytery in support of his views. In the Assembly of 1834, sup- 
ported the veto, and, in that of 1838, voted for the independence resolu- 
tions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, 
also took part in the great meeting in the West Kirk, Edinburgh, in 
August 1841, but latterly joined the Forty. Was not jaresent at the 
Convocation ; and on being requested, as an old moderator, to subscribe 
the circular summoning it, declined. 

WilHam Proudfoot, Avondale, 1814 

Professed at one time to be very strong on non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence, and was bustling and forward in their advocacy. In 
1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Latterly, 
joined the Forty, and seemed, if appearances may be judged from, the 
only man amongst them thoroughly persuaded that in doing so he had 
done something to be proud of. In the Residuary Assembly of 1843, 
was most amusingly vivacious on their having " fortified the Church,'' but 
was cruelly cut short by his more discreet brethren. 

J. Russell, LL.D., Dalserf, 1817 

In the Assembly of 1834, voted for the veto and the admission of the chapel 
ministers, and generally both before and since acted with the Evan- 
gelical i^arty. Has latterly been in a very feeble state of health. 

Hugh Dewar, Stonehouse, 1822 

So extreme an anti-patronage man that he would not take part in any 
mere non-intrusion movement, and, in support of his views in tliis 
behalf, he was both zealous and prominent. In the Assembly of 1833, 



48 GLASGOW AND AYR. 

he supported the admission of the chapel ministers, the overtures on 
calls, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In that of 1842, he voted for 
the anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member 
of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

Eobert Gillan, Wishaiv Town, 1830 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 

acted and voted with the Evangelical side. Latterly, joined the 

Forty, and since the disruption has obtained the presentation to a 

benefice vacated by one of the seceding ministers. 

Gavin Lang, Glassford, 1832 

Customarily acted and voted with the Evangelical side, but not remarkable 

for his zeal in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1833, supported the 

admission of the chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls ; and, in 

that of 1838, the independence resolutions. 

Andrew Gray, Crosshill, 1835 

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and has 
voted in support of anti-patronage views. Uniformly acted with the 
Evangelical side. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to 
Dumbarton, vacated by a seceding minister. 

Walter Laidlaw Colvin, Shotts, 1836 

Generally acted with the Evangelical side, but was never very forward or 
hearty in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition 
of the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, joined the Forty. 

Peter Hay Keith, Hamilton. 1837 

Generally acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the decla- 
i-ation against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted 
for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle's 
bill. Was rather favourable from the first to a repeal of the veto, and 
latterly joined the Forty. 

Robert Stevenson, East Parish, Airdrie, 1837 

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence, and has supported with his vote anti-patronage resolu- 
tions. Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill and the solemn Engage- 
ment. Since the disruption has obtained the presentation to Forfar, 
vacated by a seceding minister. 

John Murdoch, Clerkston, 1837 

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side, and professed the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence. Supported the independence 
resolutions in the Assembly of 1838, and in 1840 subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Since the disruption, has obtained 
the presentation to the Middle Church. Perth, vacated by a seceding 
minister. 

Vacant 
Cambuslang, 
Hohjtoivn, 

High Church, Airdrie, 
Cambusnethan, 
By deposition of A. Livingston, under libel charging him with theft. He 
has since been restored by the Residuary Assembly. 



GLASGOW AND AYR. 49 

XXVII. — PRESBYTERY OF LANARK. 

I. FREE CHURCH. 

William Logan,, North Church, Lesmahagow, 1820 

A. Borland Parker, Lesmahagow. 1836 

Thomas Stark, 6*f ieonarci'*, Lanark, 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

William Lamb, Carmichael, 1807 

George Munro, Carstairs, 1809 

William Goldie, Crawfordjohn, 1816 

John Wylie, Carluke, 1818 

Alexander Stewart, Douglas, 1820 

Alexander H. Maclean, Carnwath, 1834 

John Vary, Pittenain, 1835 

Robert Nisbet, assistant and successor, Lanark, 1842 

Class Second. 

William Menzies, Lanark, 1793 

Was settled under the auspices, and introduced to his people by the late 
venerable and Rev. Sir Henry Moncrieff, of the West Kirk Edinburgh, 
and throughout his prolonged incumbency has steadily and warmly 
supported the Evangelical side. Did not hold anti-patronage senti- 
ments, but maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual in- 
dependence, and, in the Assembly of 1833, supported the veto. Was a 
member of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the reso- 
lutions. 

Thomas Anderson, Cx'awford, 1820 

Uniformly voted and acted with the Evangelical side. Held the princi- 
ples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 
1833, supported the overtures on calls, and in that of 1841 voted for the 
deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle's bill. 

David Burncss, Wistoun, 1888 

A flaming partizan of the Evangelical side, given to declaiming against 
the encroachments of the Civil Courts, and, beyond the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence, professed anti-patronage sen- 
timents. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill ; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a 
member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 
Thomas Burns, Lesmahagow, 1839 

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill; and, in the Assembly of 1841, 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. 



XXVIII. — PRESBYTERY OF DUMBARTON. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Anderson, Helensburgh, 1827 



50 GLASGOW AND AYR. 

Matthew Barclay, Old Kilpatrick, 1833 

John Pollock, Baldernock, 1836 

WiUiam Alexander, Duntocher, 1838 

James Smith, Dumbarton, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 

John Graham, D.D., Killearn, 1805 

William Freeland, Buchanan, 1806 

William Gregor, Bonhill, 1809 

Robert Story, Roseneath, 1818 

Andrew Syni, D.D., New Kilpatrick 1821 

Alexander Niven, Balfron, 1825 

W. B. S. Paterson, Kilmaronock, 1836 

J. M'Gowan, assistant and successor, Bonhill, 1840 

William G. Smith, Fintry, 1840 

Peter Dale, Milngavie, 1841 

John James Campbell, Garelochhead, 1842 

James Pearson, Strathblane, 1842 

Class Second. 

Peter Proudfoot, Arroquhar, 1817 

A steady, unwavering partizan of the Evangelical side, professing anti- 
patronage principles, and belonging to the extreme section. In 1840, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Did not ad- 
here to the Convocation resolutions ; but, at the disruption, xvithdrcw with 
the Free Churchmen from the Establishment, and subscribed the deed of de- 
mission. Thereafter repented of the step he had taken, and sought and 
obtained re-admission to the Establishment — a proceeding in which 
he has only the example of another two or three to keep him in coun- 
tenance. It is but just to say that he had previously been in very broken 
health. 
Robert Carr, Luss, 1821 

Was accustomed to support the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 
1835, he voted for the veto and the chapel act, and opposed the settle- 
ment of Young, the presentee to Auchterarder ; and in that of 1840, he 
voted against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and in favour of the suspension of 
the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, as the controversy thickened, be- 
came more and more allied with Moderatism. 

Alexander Lochore, Drymen, 1824 

In the Assembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, 
and the overtures ou calls; and in that of 1836, voted for the anti- 
patronage resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill, and uniformly and zealously' acted with the Evange- 
lical side down to the period of tlie Convocation, when he began to draw 
off. After the Civil Court's decision in the Stewarton case, voted with 
the Moderates for the exclusion of the quoad sacra brethren from their 
seats in the Presbytery. 

John Lawrie, Row, 1832 

In the Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, and the admis- 



GLASGOW AND AYR. 51 

Sion of the chapel ministers ; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration 
against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Held the principles of non-intrusion and 
spiritual independence, and uniformly acted with the evangelical side. 
Some months before the Convocation, began to draw off. 

William Dunn, Cardross, 1836 

A high professor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual indepen- 
dence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill; and in 1842, voted for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

Henry Douglas, Alexmidria, 1841 

Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uni- 
formly acted and voted with the Evangelical side. Was a member of 
Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions ; and 
since the disruption has stepped into the pulpit of the good Mr Burns of 
Kilsyth. 



XXIX. — PRESBYTERY OF GLASGOW. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Adam Fox-man (now deceased), Kirkintilloch, 1798 

William Burns, Kilsyth, 1800 

Thomas Brown, D.D., St John's, Glasgow, 1807 

Peter Currie, Stochwell, do. 1820 

Nathaniel Paterson, D.D., St Andrew's, do. 1821 

J. Henderson, D.D., St Enoch's, do. 1821 

Michael Willis, D.D., Renjield, do. 1821 

John Smith, D.D., St George's do. 1823 
Joseph Somerville (retired from ministry in consequence of bad 

health) St Thomas's, Glasgow, 1823 

J. Forbes, D.D., LL.D., St Paul's, do. 1826 

Robert M'Nair Wilson, Mari/hill, do. 1826 

Robert Buchanan, D.D., Tron, do. 1827 

John Cochrane, East Church, Cumbernauld, 1827 

John G. Lorimer, St David's, Glasgow, 1829 

John Thomson, Shettleston, do. 1829 

Andrew King, St Stephen's, do. 1830 

Jonathan R. Anderson, Knox's Church, do. 1834 

James Gibson, Kingston, do. 1835 

Walter M'Gilvray, Hope Street, do. 1835 

James Munro, West Church, Rutherglen, 1836 

Alexander N. Somerville, Anderston Church, Glasgow, 1837 

Alexander S. Pattei'son, Hutchesontown, do. 1837 

James Macbeth, Laurieston, do. 1837 

Thomas Duncan, St David's, Kirkintilloch, 1838 

David Menzies, Marttjr's Church, Glasgow, 1839 



52 GLA.SGOAV AM) AYR. 

William Arnot, St Peter's, Glasgow, 1839 

John Lyon, Banton, Kilsyth, 184:0 

Alexander Wilson, Bridgeton, Glasgow, 1841 

James M'Kinlay, Well Park, do. 1842 

Hugh Mackay, Milton, do. 1842 

Robert Reid, Chalmers'' do. 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Duncan Macfarlane, D.D., St Mungo's, Glasgow, also Princi- 
pal of the University, 1792 
Thomas Lockerby, Cadder, 1808 
Norman M'Leod, D.D., St Columha, 1808 
Alexander Hill, D.D., Professor of Divinity in University, 1815 
John Watson, Cumbernauld, 1815 
Archibald Nisbet, Albion Church, Glasgow, 1826 
James Smith, Cathcart, 1828 
W^illiam Colville, Eaglesham, 1829 
Robert Lee, Campsie, 1833 
Peter Brown, Rutherglen, 1834 
J. Park, assistant and successor, Cadder, 1837 
James M'Letchie, College, Glasgow, 1837 

Class Second. 
Matthew Graham, Calton, Glasgow, 1802 

Seldom attended Church Courts, or otherwise took part in their proceed- 
ings, but always reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side. 

John Muir, D.D., St James's Glasgow, 1803 

Throughout his long incumbency a high professor of Evangelism, uni- 
formly acting and voting with his party. Maintained strongly the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, though of 
late years but seldom attending tlie meetings of 'Presbytery, repeatedly 
voted in support of them. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the Claim 
of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to neither series 
of the resolutions. Entertains a theory respecting the Popish relief bill 
of 1829, which serves him on many occasions as an effectual refuge 
upon points of difficulty in ecclesiastical principle and polity ; and, as 
this must be a matter of considerable interest to many in times like the 
present, it may not be without its use to present his own account of it, 
as given in a letter to a brother presbyter, dated in Febniaiy 1842, in 
reply to a request that he would signify his concurrence in a certain 
overture to the Assembly. 
"My reply," says the Doctor, "is that I lieartily concur in that part of the over- 
ture that condemns the intrusion of ministers upon reclaiming congregations; 
but, holding as I do that the favour of God was necessarily withdrawn from us 
when, in the year 1829, the nation as a nation ceased to protest publicly, in the face 
of the world, for Christ and against Antichrist, by passing what is commonly 
called the Popish Emancipation Act, and against which deed our National Church, 
as such, never protested, 1 cannot concur in that part of the overture which seeks, 
in present circumstances, the abolition of patronage. Any innovation upon the 
constitution, as it stood prior to that periud, must now be turned into a curse, in- 



C4LASCtOAV and AYR. 53 

stead of proving a blessing; and the immediate abolition of patronage would, iu 
my opinion, be the removal ot the last prop that yet. under God, upholds the Es- 
tablishment of the true Protestant reformed religion in Scotland. 
" You are at liberty to make what use you please of this letter " 

Lewis Rose, Duhe Street, Glasgow, 1817 

Before the Evangelical side attained the ascendancy in the Church, used 
to be their zealous and constant supporter in the General Assembly 
and the inferior Church Courts, but since his translation to Glasgow, and 
their becoming a majority, has passed into the ranks of their opponents, 
and uniformly voted with the ^Moderates. About two years ago pub- 
lished a pamphlet, bitterly assailing his former party, which may be 
characterized as about the worst tempered and silliest which has made 
its appearance on either side throughout the whole controversy. Since 
the disruption, has obtained the presentation to the parish of Kincar- 
dine, Ross-shire, vacated b}' a seceding minister, to which he was lately 
inducted, along with the presentees to two other parishes in the Pres- 
bytery of Tain, in one forenoon, in the good old Moderate style, at Ding- 
wall, many miles from the parishes, the Presbytery being alarmed to 
trust themselves near the locality of the indignant parishioners. 

James Young, Chryston, 1819 

Belonged to the Evangelical side, but has not attended Church Courts for 
several years past. In the Assembly of 1836, supported the anti-patro- 
nage resolutions. 

Matthew Leishman, D.D., Go van, 1821 

From the commencement ol his incumbency a keen and forward adherent 
of the Evangelical side — maintaining strongly the principles of non-in- 
trusion and spiritual independence, and originally holding anti-patron- 
age sentiments also, having voted for the anti-patronage resolutions in 
the Assembly of 1833. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill ; and, in the Assembly of 1842, voted for tlie Claim of 
Rights. Latterly the acknowledged leader, the very " head and front" 
of the movement of the Forty. 

John Henderson, Carmunnock, 1824: 

A forward advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and a uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. In the 
Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act and the veto act, and 
voted for the rejection of the presentee to Auchterarder ; and in 1840, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Latterly be- 
came one of the Forty. 

Peter Napier, St George's in the Fields, Glasgow, 1824 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
supported the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the declaration 
against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Latterly but rarely attended Church 
Courts, and joined the Forty. 

William Black, D,D., Barony, 1826 

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side, professing strongly the prin- 
ciples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and originally in- 
clined to favour anti-patronage sentimen;:s, having supported the late 
Dr M'Gill's overture on the subject in 1834. In the Assembly of 1834, 
supported the veto act and the chapel act, and again in that of 1835 ; 
and, in the latter year, likewise voted against the settlement of the pre- 
sentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill. Has repeatedly declared that he could not re- 
main in the Establishment if non-intrusion and spiritual independence 
were not conceded. Latterly joined the Forty. 



54 GLASGOW AND AYR. 

Alexander Turner, Gorbals, 1833 

Originally an editor of the Presbyterian Revietv, the great Evangelical 
organ. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and in the outset professed anti-patronage views. In the 
Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act and the veto act, and voted 
against the settlement of the Auchterarder presentee. Was amongst 
the earliest to draw off and become estranged from his former friends. 
In 1840, declared in favour of Lord Aberdeen's bill. Has recently been 
presented to the parish of Port of Menteith. 

Peter Macmorland, St Matthews, Glasgow, 1835 

A strenuous adherent of the extreme section of the Evangelical side — 
holding the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
maintaining anti-patronage views. In 1840, subscribed the declaration 
against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and the solemn Engagement ; and in the 
Assembly of 1842 supported the anti-patronage resolutions and the 
Claim of Rights. Latterly joined the Forty. Was a member of Con- 
vocation, but did not adhere to either series of the Resolutions ; never- 
theless, up to the disruption, and even after it, gave various indications 
of joining the Free Church. 

William Hunter, assistant and successor, St TJioinas''s, 1836 

Was generally reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side, but latterly 
either did not attend church courts, or withdrew before the vote. 

Eobert Paisley, Partick, 1836 

A constant supporter of the Evangelical side, belonging to the extreme 
section. Held the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual indepen- 
dence, and was a keen advocate of anti-patronage views. Was a mem- 
ber of Convocation, but entirely disapproved of the resolutions as not, 
in his view, ocaipying sufficiently extreme grounds. Since the disruption, has 
obtained the presentation to St Ninian's, vacated by a seceding minister. 

John Keid, Brownfield, Glasgow, ' 1839 

Uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. Maintained the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1842, 
voted for the Claim of Rights. Latterly joined the Forty; and since 
the disruption, has obtained a presentation to the benefice of one of the 
seceding ministers. 

J. Seaton Reid D.D., Pi^ofessor of Church History in University 

(appointed), 1841 

A minister of the Synod of Ulster, and making a full profession of all the 
principles maintained by that highly Evangelical body. 

John Underwood, Greenhead, 1842 

Was reckoned as belonging to the Evangelical side; but becoming a mem- 
ber of Presbytery when matters were hurrying to a crisis, either did not 
attend church courts, or at least usually avoided the vote. Since the 
disruption, has obtained a presentation to Kirkcudbright. 

Vacant Parishes, 
St Mark^s, Glasgow, 
St Luke's, do. 
Camlachie, do. 
Bridgegate, do. 
Springburn, do. 
Kirkfield, do. 

Strathbungo, Govan. 



ILASGOW AND AYR. 



55 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF GLASGOW AND AYR. 



FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Ayr, ministers seceding, 

Irvine, ,, 

Paisley, ,, 

Greenock, „ 

Hamilton, „ 

Lanark, „ 

Dumbarton, „ 

Glasgow, „ 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, 

2. „ of unendowed do. 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISUME.N" 

Presb3'tery of Ayr, ministers adliering, 

„ Irvine, 

„ Paisley, 

„ Greenock, 

„ Hamilton, 

„ Lanark, 

„ Dumbarton, 

,. Glasgow, 



Total of each Class, 



Total of adhering ministers, . 

The above total comprises — 

L Ministers of endowed parishes. Class 1, 
„ „ Class 2, 

2. Slinisters of unendowed parishes, Class 1, 
,, „ Class 2, 



ss Isr. 


Class JD. 


\r, 


11 


8 


3 


4 


a 


2 


2 


4 


12 


8 


4 


12 


6 


12 


15 


Co 


(il 




65 



120 



58 

40 

m 

7 

21 
28 



Presbytery of Irvine, 

„ Paisley, . 

„ Greenock, 

„ Hamilton. 

„ Glasgow, 



Vacant Parishes. 



126 

3 
1 
1 
4 

7 



S»noD of ^rggle. 



XXX. PRESBYTERY OF INVERARY. 

1. FKEE CHURCH. 

None. 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Dugald Campbell, Kilm-Glassary, 1830 

Archibald F. Stewart, Craignish, 1832 

Donald MacCalman, Kilmartin, 1836 

Class Second. 
D. M'Lachlan, North Knapdale, 1827 

Formerly, when in Caithness-shire, a high professor of Evangelical prin- 
ciples, and uniformly and strenuously supported the party. After his 
entry upon his present charge, subscribed a non-intrusion petition, and 
made other movements in the same cause. Latterly has lapsed into 
Moderatism. 

Colin Smith, Inverary, 1828 

A constant and uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and held re- 
peated public meetings in their behalf. In the Assembly of 1834, sup- 
ported the veto; in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill ; and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of 
the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle's bill. Was a mem- 
ber of Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

Duncan Campbell, Inverarj, * 1829 

Has of more recent years generally voted with the Evangelical side, but 
was never reckoned a very strenuous supporter of their cause. In the 
Assembly of 1838, he supported the independence resolutions; in 1840, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; while, in the 
Assembly of 1841, he opposed the anti-patronage resolutions, and did 
not vote for the Claim of Rights. 

Vacant. 
Lochgilphead. 
South Knapdale. P. 



XXXI. — PRESBYTERY OF DUNOOX. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Mackintosh Mackay, LL.D., Dunoon and Kilmun, 1825 

Peter M'Bnde, Neiu Parish, Eothsay, 1825 



ARGYLE, 57 

Robert Craig, Rothsay, 1829 

Joseph Stark, Kilfinan, 1832 

Alexander M'Bride, North Bute, 1835 

Duncan M'Lean, Kilmodan, 1836 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James Ferguson, Strachur, 1820 

John Buchanan, Kmgarth 1827 

A. M'Tavish, Inverchaolain, 1829 

Class Second. 
J. Macdougall, Lochgoilhead and Kilmorich, 1822 

A constant and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side^ — maintaining 
the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the As- 
sembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions ; and, in that of 
1842, for the Claim of Rights. Was a member of Convocation, but 
did not adhere to either series of resolutions. 



XXXII. rRESBYTERY OF KINTYRE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Angus M'Millan, Kilmory (since deceased), 1822 

Hector M'Neil, assistant and successor, 2d Cliarge, Canipbelton, 1835 
Duncan M'Nab, 1st do.^ do. 1S39 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Donald M'Donald, Killearn, 1797 

Allan M'Naughton, D.D.. Kilbride, 1818 

John Macfarlane, Saddell and Skipness, 1822 

Class Second. 

Daniel Kelly, 2d Charge, Campbelton, 1816 

From the outset uniformly and steadily supported the Evangelical side. 
Voted with the late Dr Andrew Thomson, of St George's, Edinburgh, on 
the orders in Council regarding prayers for Queen Caroline. In the 
Assemblies of 1833 and 1834, supported the veto and the chapel acts. 
Was, in 1836, suspended sine die 

John M' Arthur, Kilcalmonell, 1820 

Held strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and was very forward and energetic in their advocacy, as leader uf his 
presbytery on the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834, sup- 
ported the veto act and the chapel act; in that of 1838, the inde- 
pendence resolutions; and, in that of 1841, the deposition of the Strath- 
bogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle's bill. Since the disruption has 
become minister of North Bute, a qKoad sacra parish, erected by a se- 
ceding minister. 



58 ARGYLE. 

James Curdie, Giglia, 1825 

Held the principles of non-intrusion and sjiiritual independence, and uni- 
formly acted with the Evangelical side. In the Assemblies of 1832 and 
1833, supported the overtures on calls; and, in that of 1835, voted for 
the veto act, the chapel act, and against the settlement of the pre- 
sentee to Auchterai'der. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill, and continued to the last to act with his party. 

Colin Fisher Campbell, S;iuthend, 1843 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
adhered to the first sei-ies of the Convocation resolutions. After the dis- 
ruption, he addressed his congregation from the pulpit on the subject, 
and intimated that he would take advantage of the few days left him 
by the General Assembly to make up his mind as to his future course. 
The impression produced by this address was, that he fully intended to 
withdraw from the Establishment, — so much so that one of the heritors 
stood up and implored him, before the whole congregation, to delay his 
secession till after the communion. 

Vacant, 
Brodick, Arran. 



XXXIII. — PRESBYTERY OF ISLA AND JURA. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander Cameron, Kilchoman, 1819 

James Pearson, Kilmeny, P. 1829 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Archibald M'Tavish, Kildalton, . 1812 

Alexander Kennedy, Jura and Colonsay, 1816 

Alexander M'Nab, Oa, P. 1826 

Class Second. 
Colin Hunter, Portnahaven, P. 1824: 

A keen and steady supporter of the Evangelical side, belonging to the 
extreme section. In the Assembly of 1838, supported the independence re- 
solutions; and in 1840,subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill. In the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie 
recusants and the Duke of Argyle's bill ; and, in that of 1842, for the 
anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. At the disrup- 
tion joined the Fi-ee Church, and subscribed the deed of demission, and, 
after aU this, coolly returned to the Establishment. Has since secured a 
presentation to the parish of Kilninver. 

Vacant. 
Killarow. 



59 



XXXIV. — PRESBYTERY OF LORN. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Hugh Fraser, Ardchattan, 1807 

William Fraser, Kilchrennan, 1827 

Finlay M'Pherson, Kilbrandon, 1833 

Duncan M'Lean, Glenorchy, 1835 

Archibald Bannatyne, Ohan, 1843 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Donald M'Naughton, Duror, P. 1814 

Dugald Neil Campbell, Kilmore, 1829 

Gregor M'Gregor, Lismore, 1836 

Vacant. 
Kilninver. 
Muckairn. P. 

XXXV. PRESBYTERY OF MULL. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Donald M'Vean, lona, P. 1835 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

D. M' Arthur, D.D., Kilninian, 1810 

Neil M'Lean, Tiree, 1811 

Donald Campbell, Kilfinichen, 1814 

John M'Leod, Morven, 1824 

Neil M'Lean, IJlva, P. 1828 

D. Stewart, Kinlochspelvie, P. 1828 

Alexander Mackenzie, Strontian, P. 1829 

Duncan Clerk, Torosay, 1829 

James Dewar, Salen, P. 1836 

Donald Stewart, Tobermory, P. 1838 

Class Second. 
Archibald Clerk, Ardnamurchan, 1838 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally supported the Evangelical side. 

Vacant. 
Aucharacle. P. 



60 



PERTH AND STIRLING. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF ARGYLE. 


FREE CHURCH. 




Presbytery of Inverary, ministers seceding, 
„ Dunoon^ „ 



. 6 


;, Kintyre, „ 
„ Isla and Jura^ ., 


3 
2 


„ Lorn, „ 


5 


Mull, „ . . ' 


1 


Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 


17 


The above total comprises— 

I . Ministers of endowed parishes, . 


14 


2. „ of unendowed do. 


3 




17 


RESIDUA R Y ESTABLISHMEN r. 




Class Ist. 
Prosbytery of Lu-erary, ministers adhering, . 3 
„ Dunoon, „ . . 3 


Class 20. 
3 

1 


„ Kintyre, „ . 3 
„ Isla and Jura, „ . . 3 


4 
I 


„ Lorn, ,, .3 





Mull, „ . . 10 


1 


Total of each Class, . 25 


10 




25 



Total of adhering ministers. 

All ministei-s of endowed parishes. 



Pariiifics Vacant. 



Presbytery of Inverary, 
„ Kintyre, 

„ Isla and Jura, 

„ Lorn, 

Mull, . 

Total, 



^imon of pert!) anU Stirlmg. 



XXXVI. PRESBYTERY OF DUNKELD. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 



Micliacl Stirling, Cargill, 
John Waddell, Burrellton, 
George Millar, Clunic, 
William Grant, Tenandnj, 



1808 
1825 
1836 
1836 



I'KRTII AX1> STIULINCJ. 61 

Francis Gillies, Rattray, 1837 

Andi-ew Kessen, Letliendy and Kinloch, 1838 

John Mackenzie, Dunkeld and Dowally, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
H. Henderson, Kinclaven, 1823 

Thomas Nelson, Auchtergaven, 1831 

Class Second. 

Peter Drummond, Kirkmichael, 1819 

A keen and violent partisan of the Evangelical side, holding anti-patron- 
age views, and belonging to the most extreme section. Was always very 
fierce against Moderatism, and complained of those who received Mode- 
rate ministers into their pulpits at communion occasions. In the Assem- 
bly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, the admission of the chapel 
ministers, and the anti-patronage resolutions. In 1838, concurred with 
the majority of the Presbytery in proceeding with the ordination of 
Mr Kessen in the face of the Court of Session's interdict. Presided at the 
ordination, and preached a very strong sermon on the occasion; after- 
wards was rebuked, witli the other members of the majority, at the bar 
of the Court of Session. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to 
neither series of the resolutions, they not being extreme enough to 
meet his views. 

Robert Allan, Little Dunkeld, 1824 

A keen and forward supporter of the Evangelical side, professing anti-pa- 
tronage sentiments. In 1838, concurred in the ordination of Mr Kes- 
sen, and was rebuked at the bar of the Court of Session. In 1840, sub- 
scribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the Assembly 
of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the 
Duke of Argyle's bill. Was a member of convocation, and adhered to 
the first series of the resolutions. 

Duncan Campbell, Moulin, 1832 

Generally acted with the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of 

non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but was never very forward 

in their behalf. In 1838, took part in the ordination of Mr Kessen, and 

was rebuked at the bar of the Civil Court . 

Alexander Wilson, Caputh, 1835 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly and zealously supported the Evangelical side. In 1838, con- 
curred in the ordination of Mr Kessen, and was rebuked at the bar of 
the Civil Court. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the 
first series of resolutions, and afterwards gave various public indications 
of an intention to withdraw from the Establishment. 
Vacant. 
Blair-Athol. 



XXXVII. PRESBYTERY OF WEEM. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander Stewart, Killin, 1839 

Alexander Mackinnon, Strathjillan, 1840 



62 PERTH AND STIRLING. 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

David DufF, D.D., Kenmore, 1806 

Alexander Campbell, V/eem, 1820 

Alexander R. Irvine, Fortingall, 1830 

Duncan Dewar, Dull, 1839 

Samuel Cameron, Logierait, 1840 

James Armstrong, Foss. 1842 

Class Second. 

John Macdonald, Rannoch, 1830 

A keen and uniform supporter of the Evangelical side. Maintained the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and %vas forward 
in their advocacy. Last year moved, in i)resbytery, the rejection of the 
presentee to Glenlyon under the veto act. 
Vacant. 
Glenlyon. 



XXXVIII. — PRESBYTERY OF PERTH. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

W. A. Thomson, D.D., Middle Church Perth, 1801 

James Grierson, Errol, 1819 

James M'Lagan, Kinfauns, 1821 

James Drummond, Forgandemiy, 1828 

John W. Thomson, Moneydie, 1828 

Andrew Gray, West Church, Perth, 1832 

C. C. Stewart, Aberdalgie, 1832 

Vvilliam Mather, Stanley, " 1832 

Alexander Camming, Dunbarney, 1834 

Andrew Bonar, assistant and successor, CoUace,. 1838 

Charles Stewart, St Stephen's, Perth, 1838 

John Milne, St Leonard's, do. 1839 

John Walker Kinnoul Street, do. 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John. Rogers, Collace, 1800 

John Findlay, D.D„ St Paul's, Perth, 1803 

James Esdaile, D.D., East Kirk, do. 1805 

William Liston, Redgorton, 1812 

James Traquair, Rhynd, 1814 

R. J. Robertson, Forteviot, 1815 

John Edward Touch, Kiimoull, 1817 



PERTH AND STIRLING. 63 

Bavkl Black, Kilspindie, 1818 

Thomas Buchanan, Methveii, 1832 

Class Second. 
David Duncan, Aherncthy, . 1809 

A constant and steady supporter of tlie Evangelical side. Professed the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and likewise 
held anti-patronage sentiments. In the Assembly of 1834, supported 
the veto; and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill. Afterwards voted for the suspension of the Strathbogie 
ministers, and attended the great ^y est Church Meeting in August 1841. 
Latterly professed himself one of the Forty. 

Alexander Burt, Arno-ask, 1827 

Professed anti-patronage sentiments, and long a steady supporter of the 
measures of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1832, supported 
the overtures on calls; and in that of 1841, voted for the deposition of 
the Strathbogie recusants. Latterly, his zeal and forwardness flagged 
a good deal. 

James Noble, St Madoes, 1828 

A warm, zealous, and decided advocate of the Evangelical cause, and a 
sufferer by interdicts and otherwise at the hands of his heritors, in con- 
quence of his activity in promoting non-intrusion meetings, &c, In tlie 
Assembly of 1833, supported the overtures on calls, and the admission 
of the chapel ministers ; and in that of 1838, voted for the independence 
resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill and the solemn Engagement. Attended the great West Church 
Meeting in August 1841; and in the Assembly of 1842, supported the 
anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to bolh series of the resolutions. Was present 
at the meeting of members of Convocation preliminary to the Assembly 
of 1843, when the disruption was finally resolved on. 

James Craik, Scone, 1832 

Generally acted with the Evangelical side, but cautiously. Supported the 
veto, and, in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the popular election of 
the eldership. Since the disruption, has been presented to St George's, 
Glasgow, vacated by a seceding minister. 

AVeir Tulloch, Tibbermore, 1833 

An editor of the Perthshire Aclvcrtiser during the ferment of the Reform 
Bill. A vehement advocate of popular principles. In the Assembly of 
1841, voted for the anti-patronage resolutions and the deposition of the 
Strathbogie recusants. Took part in a great non-intrusion meeting held 
at Perth in October 1841, presided over by the jNIarquis of Breadalbane, 
and moved the third resolution, that if the principles against which the 
Church was contending were established, they would " be subversive of the 
government appointed by the Lord Jesus in his Church," &c. ; and that 
" the administration of the affairs of the Clmrch, on such a footing, could 
not be conducted or submitted to by the office-bearers holding the jirin- 
ciples set forth in the preceding resolution." This resolution he sup- 
ported in a very strong speech, in which he declared, amongst other 
things, " that the Church had not submitted, and, without being guilty 
of a great sin, never could submit, to the encroachments of the civil 
courts ;" that " exclusive jurisdiction in things spiritual is a privilege 
which the office-bearers are bound to defend at all hazards and in de- 



(54: PERTH AND STIRLING. 

fiance of all difficulties;" and, amid great applause, called upon all true 
sons of the Church to rally round her, " if they would not see the 
blightening influence of Moderatism and violent settlements again over- 
spreading the land— if they would not transmit as a legacy to their 
children a church which might insult their holiest feelings and disregard 
their bpst interests, and when again, as formerly, they might be fed with, 
husks of Christianized heathenism, instead of the pure bread of life — if, 
in a word, they would not prove base traitors to the King of kings and the 
Lord of lords." &c. Likewise presided at a meeting in his own parish in 
February last, for explaining the principles and forwarding the object of 
the Convocation. 

Patrick J. Macfarlane, M.D., Dron, 1836 

A professed friend of the Evangelical cause and of the spiritual indepen- 
dence of the Church, but never took a prominent part in public matters, 

William Ritchie, St Martin's, 1838 

Maintained anti-patronage sentiments, and was chosen by the people in 
1838 to be minister of the parish as an avowed supporter of popular 
principles. Since the disruption, has been preferred to the parish of 
Longforgan, vacated by Mr Walker, whose principles throughout the 
controversy were never so extreme as his own. 

John Struthers, Rhynd, 1841 

Signed the '•' memorial " addressed by the divinity students of Edinburgh 
to the General Assembly in 1840, expressing admiration and gratitude 
to Almighty God for the resolute stand made by the Church against the 
aggressions of the secular power, and vindicating the principle of non- 
intrusion. 



XXXIX. PRESBYTERY OF AUCHTERARDER. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Peter Brydie, Fossaway, 1816 

James Thomson, Muckart, ^ 1832 

John Ferguson, Monivaird, 1835 

John Reid Omond, Monzie, 1836 

Finlay Macahster, West Church, Crieff, - 1839 

Samuel Grant, Ardoch, 1810 

Andrew Noble, Blairingone, 18-11 

James Garment, Comrie, 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John Clark, Blackford, 1815 

William Laing, Crieff, 181^ 

Alexander Maxton, FouHs Wester, 1817 

James Russell, D.D., Dunning, 1818 

William Stoddart, Madderty, 1830 

Alexander Hill Gray, Trinity-Gask, 1836 

R. Stevenson, assistant and successor, Crieff, 1840 



PERTH AND STIRLING. 65 

Class SWond. 
Thomas Young, Gask, 1813 

From the outset of his incumbency, a steady supporter of the Evangelical 
side. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence resolutions ; 
and in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. 
Concurred in all the proceedings by his Presbytery which led to the 
celebrated Auchterarder case, and in their refusals, at the successive 
stages of the proceedings, to take the presentee on trials, as i-equired by 
the civil com'ts, and, on one of the latest occasions of the kind, moved 
the resolution to that effect. Concurred also in sending up anti-patron- 
age overtures to the General Assemblv'. 

James Walker, Muthil, 1826 

A loud and flaming professor of Evangelical principles, holding anti- 
patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extremest section. In the 
Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls; and in that of 
1835, the chapel act and the veto act. In 1840, subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and the solemn Engagement. Not 
only concurred in all the proceedings of his Presbytery during the de- 
pendence of the Auchterarder case, but invariably attempted to lead on 
the subject, and constantly urged the most decided measures. Fre- 
quently held meetings in his own parish during the progress of the con- 
troversy, and assisted at many others in different parts of the country. 
Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of resolutions. 
Turned round shortly before the disruption, and opposed his former 
friends in the Presbytery. 

James Cunningham, Glendevon, 1839 

Uniformly supported the Evangelical side, and concurred with the ma- 
jority of his Presbytery in all their proceedings relative to the Auchter- 
arder case. Held public meetings in his parish during the progress of 
the controversy. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill. Concurred likewise in sending up anti-patronage 
overtures to the General Assemblj\ 

Parish Vacant. 
Auchterarder. 



XL. PRESBYTERY OF STIRLINC4. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Dempster, Denny, 1800 

Christopher Greig, St Ninians, 1800 

George Cupples, Second Charge, Stirling, 1812 

Alexander Beith, First do. do. 1822 

William Mackray, Spittal Square, do. 1824 

Alexander Leitch, Third Charge, do. 1825 

John Bonar, Larbert and Dunipace, 1826 

John Wright, Alloa East, 1830 

John Harper, Bcmnockburn, 1839 

Ebenezer Johnstone, Plean, 1839 



66 PERTH AND STIRLING. 

2, RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First 
John Caw, Bothkennar, 179& 

Andrew Mylne, D.D., Dollar, 181S 

Class Second. 

Peter Brotlierston, Alloa and Tillibody West, 1808 

An ardent and steady supporter of the Evangelical side, holding anti- 
patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extreme section. In the 
Assembly of 1835, supported the veto act, the chapel act, and the anti- 
patronage resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement. 
Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. 
Continued to maintain his constancy until a little before the disruption, 
when he made the discovery from prophecy that the " Two Witnesses" 
of the Apocalypse were to be slain in the Establishment, and remained 
in, it is to be presumed, for the purpose of being slain. 

Peter Balfour, Clackmannan, 1828 

A keen advocate of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and a steady supporter of the Evangelical side. In the 
Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants,, 
the Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership. 
Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of reso- 
lutions, but opposed the second, and never afterwards co-operated with 
his former party, 

Andrew Brown, Alva, 1835 

A very stead}' and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side. In the As- 
sembly of 1842, supported the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim 
of Rights, Just before the Convocation, encountered a vei-y severe acci- 
dent, which l^id him aside from duty for several months, and prevented 
him from attending; but, after his recovery in March 1843, lie invited 
Mr Bonar, now the Free Church minister of Larbert, to address his 
people on the subject, and otherwise acted cordially with his party. 

Colin M'Cullocli, Hags, Denny, 1841 

A very high and ardent professor of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and a thorough-going supporter of the Evangelical side up to 
the era of the Convocation. Since the disruption has obtained the pre- 
sentation to Denny, vacated by that venerable aiid faithful man of God, 
Mr Dempster. 

Vacant Parishes, 
Ai'rtli, 

Sauchie , 

Gargunnock, 

The last of these parishes is vacant by the demise of the Rev. Mr Lawrie, 
very shortly before the disruption. He was a steady and faithful pro- 
ft'ssor of Evangelism, and would have rejoiced to cast in his lot with the 
Free Church. 



XLI. PRESBYTERY OF DUNBLANE. 

L FREE CHURCH. 

Hcniy Andci-son, Tillicoultry, 1808 



PERTH AND STIRLING. 67 

William Anderson, Kippen, l-^H 

Peter Robertson (retired from the ministry), Callander, 1813 

Thomas Hislop, Dcamton 1816 

Peter M'Laren, Lecropt, ' 1821 

James Duncan, Kincardine East, 1826 

William Mackenzie, Dunblane, 1829 

William Watt, Bucklyvie, 1837 

David Black, 6rrt rfmo?-e, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Alexander Gray, D.D., Kincardine, 1813 

R. C. Graham, Aberfoyle, 1826 

Class Second. 
William Robertson Logie, 1831 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly supported the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1835, 
voted for the veto act, and the chapel act. Was a member of Convo- 
cation, but did not adhere to either scries of resolutions. 

A. M. M'Gregor, Balquhidder, 1832 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. 

Walter Nicoll, Norriston, 1833 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly supported the Evangelical side. 

G. Hope, Monilaws, Tulliallan, 1836 

A keen and zealous supporter of the Evangelical side in all their measures, 
belonging to the extreme section, professing anti-patronage principles, 
and the leader of his Presbytery. In the Assembly of 1842, voted for 
the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of Rights. Was a member 
of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. In April 
1843, was elected by the Evangelical majority moderator of the Synod 
of Perth and Stirling, and in this capacity was served with an interdict 
from the civil courts forbidding the Synod to proceed to business so long 
as the quoad sacra members were allowed to retain their seats. He 
immediately dissolved the Synod and quitted the chair, as being 
under civil coercion, which impeded all conscientious deliberation. 
Gave repeated public indications of an intention to join the Free 
Church, but as often drew back, and has latterly become one of the 
most active and useful of the Residuaries. 

Gordon Mitchell, Kilmadock, 1838 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly acted with the Evangelical side. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, 
but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

Pnrip/} VacmU 
Port of Mrutcith, 



(^S 



PERTH AND STIRLIiVa. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF PERTH AND STIRLING. 



FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Dunkeld, ministers seceding, 
Weem, 
Perth, 
Auchterarder 

Stirling, 
Dunblane, 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parislies, 

2. ,. of unendowed do. 



49 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Presbytery of Dunkeld, ministers adliering, 
Weem, „ 

Perth, 

Auchterarder, „ 

Stirling, „ 

Dunblane, „ 

Total of each Class, 



Class 1st. Class 2o. 



Total of adhering ministers, 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes. Class 1, 

„ Class 2, 

2. Ministers of imendowed parislies, Class S 

Vacant Parishes. 
Presbytery of Dunkeld, 
„ Weem, 

„ Auchterarder, 

„ Stirling, 

„ Dunblane, 



53 



FIFE. 69 

S»noD of JTife. 

XLIl. — PRESBYTERY OF DUNFERMLINE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Balfour, Second Charge, Cuh'oss, 1816 

James Thornton, Milnathort, 1816 

Thomas Doig, Torryburn, 1819 

WiUiam Gilston, Carnock, 1827 

William Wallace Duncan, Cleish, 1836 

Andrew Sutherland, St Andreiv's, Dunfermline, 1839 

Charles Marshall, North Church, do. 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Andrew Robertson, Inverkeithing, 1792 

William Forfar, Saline, 1793 

James Fergusson, Beath, 1815 

John Gilchrist, Orwell, 1842 

Class Second. 

William Dalziel, St Canmore, Dunfermline, 1815 

Belonged originally to the Synod of Old Light Burghers, which was united 
to the Establishment some years ago. Held anti-patronage principles, 
and thought that the Evangelical party in the Church did not by any 
means go far enough in maintaining these principles. In 1840, sub- 
scribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; but as the contro- 
versy assumed a more serious aspect, drew gradually off from the Evan- 
gelical side, until at length he ended by supporting their opponents. 
Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to Thurso, from an 
anti-patronage patron, Sir George Sinclair. 

Peter Chalmers, First Charge, Dunfermhne, 1817 

A steady supporter of the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1833, 
supported the admission of the chapel ministers and the overtures on 
calls. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. 
Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolu- 
tions. Long wavered what course to take, but at length, some days 
after the disruption, applied to the Free Assembly, and was admitted 
into the Free Church. Thereafter preached and intimated the commu- 
nion to that portion of his flock who had quitted the Establishment 
along with him. Attended the first diet, but not the second, of the first 
meeting of the Free Presbytery of Dunfermline, declining, however, 
when called upon, to pray. At the first meeting thereafter of the Resi- 
duary Presbytery, attended personally, and craved re-admission to his 
charge in the Establishment, which was graciously accorded to his sup- 
plications. 

Andrew Bethune Duncan, First Charge, Culross, 1824 

A very decided and steady supporter of the Evangelical side. Held 



70 FIFE. 

strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, lo 
the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto act and the chapel act; in 
that of 1838, the independence resolutions; and in that of 1842, the 
anti-patronage resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Was a member of 
Convocation, but did not adhere to either series of the resolutions. 

Hugh Ralph, LL.D., Aberdour, 182-i 

A recent importation from Liverpool. Assumed a very high spiritual and 
evangelistic tone in the Presbytery, enlarging much upon prayer, &c, ; 
and while voting on every question with the Moderates, professed to 
entertain, after a fashion, the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence. On the occasion of electing presbyterial representatives 
for the Assembly of 1842, maintained that no man could pi-ay who did 
not adhere to the usual rotation system ; and on the similar occasion in 
1843, voted that it should be departed from. The immense body of his 
parishioners are zealous Free Churchmen, 
Alexander Watt, Dalgety, 1828 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but 
avowed himself a warm admirer of patronage. In the Assembly of 
1832, supported the overtures on calls, and generally acted with the 
Evangelical side. During the controversy, withdrew to the Continent, 
on the score of ill health, where he remained upwards of a year, having 
but little communication with his parish, or with the presbytery. In the 
course of his rambles, reached as far as Rome, and had his name called 
out in English diu'ing the Carnival ; was at length summoned home by 
the Presbytery ; and after his return, sided warmly with the Moderates, 
declaring that, during his residence abroad, he had enjoyed far better 
opportunities of studying the controversy than his brethren at home, 

John Tod Brown, Second Charge, DunfermUne, 1837 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence 
and, as he forcibly and elegantly expressed it in the Assembly of 1841 j 
was anti-patronage to " the very extreme of antagonism and antipathy.'' 
In 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement ; but by the Assemblj^ of 
1841, had begun to draw off, having, in the Assembly of that year, while 
he supported the anti-patronage resolutions, opposed the deposition of 
the Strathbogie recusants. Subsequently he has uniformly and zeal- 
ously opposed the Evangelical side. 

John Tannoch, Kinross, 1837 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. 
In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill; and 
in the Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie re- 
cusants, and the Duke of Argyle's bill. Uniformly supported the Evan- 
gelical side, until his translation to Kinross ; since which, he has acted 
with the Moderates. 



XLIII. — PRESBYTERY OF KIRKALDY, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Hugh Land, D.D., Poitmoak, 1801 

James Severight, Markinch, 1815 

John Thomson, Dvsart, 1820 



FIFE. 71 

Robert Macindoe, East Port Church, Kirkuldy, 1831 

Alexander O. Laird, Abbotshall, 1833 

David Couper, Burntisland, 1834 

John Alexander, Kirkaldy, 1836 

Charles Jameson, Pathhead, 1840 

John Isdale, Inverteil, 18-43 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Andi'ew Murray, D.D., Auchterderran, 1783 

David Guild, Auchtertool, 1800 

George Brewster, Scoonie, 1813 

John M'Lachlan, Wemyss, 1813 

J. M. Cunninghame, Kinglassie, 1815 

.Tames NicoU, Leshe, 1825 

David Bell, Kennoway, 1831 

John L. Adamson, Thornton, 1838 

Class Second, 
James Greig, Ballingray, 1807 

Throughout his long incumbency a constant and earnest supporter of the 
Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and 
spiritual independence ; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to 
both series of th^i Convocation's resolutions, 

David Murray, Dysart, 1813 

A uniform supporter of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles 

of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and held anti-patronage 

views. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. 

Fei'gus Jardine, Kinghorn, 1830 

Originally a very steady and forward adherent of the Evangelical side. 
Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. 
In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls. In 1840, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and, in the 
Assembly of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants. 
Afterwards drew off, and latterly acted uniformly with the Moderates. 

John 3I'Ewcn, Miltoii, 1839 

Held anti-patronage sentiments, and steadily voted with the Evangelical 
side until the last. Was a member of Convocation, but did not adhere 
to either series of the resolutions. 

Vacant. 
Methel. 

■ XLIV, — PRESBYTERY OF CUPAR. 
1. FREE CHURCH. 

Andrew Melville, Loffie, 1803 



72 FIFE. 

John Macfarlane, CoUessie, 1823 

Adams Cairns, Cupar, 1828 

Anirus M'Gillivray, Dairsie, 1828 

James Brodie, Monimail, 1829 

John Duncan, assistant and successor, Ceres, 1836 

John Murray, Dunbog, 1837 

George Smeaton, Falkland, 1839 

James W. Taylor, Flisk, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Joseph Crichton, Ceres, 1786 

Alexander Kidd, D.D., Monzie, 1807 

Alexander Lawson, Criech, 1815 

Henry D. Cook, Kilmany, 1815 

John Anderson, D.D., Newburgh, 1821 

John Thomson, Balmerino, 1824 

George Middleton, Strathmiglo, 1836 

John Duncan, Abdie, 1839 

Class Second. 

Robert Johnstone, Auclitermuchty, 1829 

Long a keen partizan of the Evangelical side, and a Haniing professor of 
the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and until 
recently a leader in his Presbytery in struggling for them. In the As- 
sembly of 1833, supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and 
the overtures on calls. Was among the earliest to begin to draw oft" when 
the controversy began to assume a serious aspect, and latterly in most 
essential matters opposed himself keenly to his former friends. After 
the disruption received a presentation to Dunblane, which he accepted, 
but afterwards withdrew his acceptance, on the ground that his voice 
was too weak for the church, &c. Immediately^afterwards, was brought 
forward as a candidate for St Mary's, Edinburgh, was se%'erely dealt 
with in the discussion which followed in the Town Council of Edin- 
burgh, and ultimately experienced a cutting and ignominious rejection 
at their hands. 

William Elder, St Mary's, Cupar, 1!]3G 

Was originally of the Old Light Burgher Synod, and belonged to the most 
extreme section of the Evangelical side, considering Di's Candlish, Cun- 
ningham, &c., as but middlemen, who never went half far enou2h to 
satisfy his views. In 1840, Jie subscribed the declaration against Lord 
Aberdeen's bill, and the solemn Engagement. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. Since the dis- 
ruption, has obtained a Crown presentation to the parish of Tealing, 
vacated by a seceding minister. 

William Reid, Kettle, 1838 

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and S[)iritual in- 
dependence, and uniformly and zealously supported the Evangelical 
side, up to his settlement in Kettle ; but since tlien has acted wit'i the 
Moderates. In the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence 
resolutions; and in 1840, subscribed the solemn Engagement. 



FIFE. 73 

James Anderson, Cults, 1839 

A keen supporter of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence, In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a member of Convocation, 
and adhered; ?o both series of the resolutions. In the end of March 1843, for- 
mally withdrew his adherence by letter, and went over to the Moderates. 

James Cochrane, Cupar, 1842 

While a preacher, and Secretary to the Church Extension Committee, &c., 

made a very high profession of the principle of spiritual independence, 

but never pretended to stand so much upon non-intrusion. Since his 

settlement in Cupar, has acted with the Moderates. 



XLV. PRESBYTERY OF ST ANDREWS. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Robert Brown, Largo, 1821 

Ralph Robb, Strathklnnes, 1827 

William Nicolson, Ferry-Port-on-Crai:^, 1828 

Charles Nairn, Forgan, 1836 

William Ferrie, Easter Anstruther, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
James Macdonald, D.D., Kemback, 1781 
James Hunter, D.D., Professor of Logic and Rhetoric in Uni- 
versity ,-^St Leonard's, 1795 
George Buist, CD., Professor of Ecclesiastical History in Uni- 
versity, Second Charge, St Andrews, 1802 
Robei't Swan, Abercrombie, 1804 
James Roger, Denino, 1805 
Robert Haldane, D.D., Principal and Professor of Systematic 
Theology, St Mary's College, St Andrews, First Charge, 
St Andrews, 1807 
George Wright, Kingsbarns, 1809 
David Watson, Leuchars, 1809 
George Dickson, Kilrenny, 1815 
Anstruther Taylor, Carnbee, 1816 
William Merson, Crail, • 1828 
Hew Scott, Anstruther Wester, 1832 
George Milligan, Elie, 1832 
Thomas T. Jackson, Professor of Biblical Criticism and Theo- 
logy in University, 1836 
Class Second. 
William Ferrie, D.D., Professor of Civil Histoiy in University, 

Kilconquhar, 1814 
Originally acted M'ith the Moderate?, and only of late years shewed any 



74 



FIFE. 



leaning towards Evangelical principles ; and any support he ever lent 
them has been fitful and uncertain. In the Assembly of 1841, he voted 
for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and for the popular 
election of the eldership. 

John Cooper, Pittenweem, 1833 

A strenuous adherent of the Evangelical cause, and vehement from the 
pulpit and otherwise in his advocacy of the principles of non-intrusion 
and spiritual independence. In the Assembly of 1835, he supported the 
veto act and the chapel act, and opposed the settlement of the presen- 
tee to Auchterarder. He was a member of Convocation, but did not 
adhere to either series of the resolutions. 



Andrew Brown, Camer( 



1838 



Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally supported the Evangelical side, but never very decided or 
zealous. 

Vaca7it. 
Newburn. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOP OF FIFE, 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Dunfermline, ministers seceding, . . 7 

„ Kirkaldy, „ . . . .9 

„ Cupar, „ ... 9 

„ St Andrews, „ . . . .5 

Total Free Church ministers in Synod, . 30 

The above total comprises — 

1, Ministers of endowed parishes, ... 23 

2. Ministers of unendowed do., , . . .7 

— 30 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 

Presbytery of Dunfermline, ministers adhering, . 4 7 

„ Kirkaldy. .... 8 4 

„ Cupar, . . . .8 5 

,, St Andrews, . . ^ 14 3 



Total of each Class 



34 



Total of adhering ministers, 
The above number comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, Professors, &c.. Class 1, 

„ „ Class 2, 

2. „ of unendowed parishes. Professors, &c.. Class 1, 

Class 2, 



33 

16 
— 49 

3 

— 4 



53 



ANGUS AND MEARNS. 75 

Vacant Parishes. 
Presbytery of Kukaldy, ..... 1 

",, St AndrewSj . . . . • 1 



Ssttott of ^ngus anti ^cavns. 

XLVI. — PRESBYTERY OF MEIGLE, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

David Wliite, Airlie, 1833 

Robert Macdonald, Blairgowrie, 1837 

2, RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James Mitchell, D.J)., Meigle, 1808 

William Ramsay, Alyth, 1817 

Patrick Barty, Ruthven, 1823 

John Moon, Newtyle, 1825 

Patrick J. Stevenson, Coupar- Angus, 1828 

James Flowerdew, Essie, 1828 

James Watt, Glenisla, 1828 

James S. Barty, Bendochy, 1829 

Francis Cannan, Lintrathen, 1831 

James Haldane, Kingoldrum, 1836 

J. M'Duff, Kettins, 1842 
Class First. 
None. 

XLVII. — PRESBYTERY OF FORFAR. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

WiUiam Clugston, Forfar,- 1817 

Donald Fergusson, Dunnichen, 1837 

Daniel Cormick, South Church, Kirriemuir, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John Buist, Tannadice, 1796 

Robert Lunan, Kinnettles, 1807 

John Crombie, D.D., Aberlemno, 1819 

WiUiam Ogilvy, Cortachy, 1826 

T. J. Crawford, Glammis, 1834 

Class Second. 

Thomas Easton, D.D., Kirriemuir, 1810 
Long a professor of very high Evangelical and ijopular principles. Was 
a candidate for the Greek Professorship at Glasgow when the late 9ir 



76 ANGUS AND MEARNS. 

Daniel K. Sandford was elected to the chair, and obtained his Doc- 
iorskip from the Faculty immediately after his defeat. Was the author of 
a very singular and very vehement attack upon Dr Chalmers' astrono- 
mical discourses, when they were first rising into renown, in the shape 
of an anonymous pamphlet, of which the most remarkable feature is the 
number of pages he contrives to fill exclusively with making merry 
at the idea of a universe being comprised within an atom. In the As- 
sembly of 1835, supported the veto act, the chapel act, and the anti- 
patronage resolutions, and opposed the settlement of the presentee to 
Auchterarder. In that of 1838, supported the independence resolutions. 
When affairs began to wear a serious aspect, published a letter, ad- 
dressed to Sir R. Robert Peel, on the proper mode of settling the Church's 
difficulties ; and when this failed of duly swaying the Premier's pur- 
pose, afterwards gradually drew off into the ranks of Moderatism. 
Since the disruption has been a most active and inveterate Residuary. 

George Loudon, Inverarity, 1819 

Long a decided and steady supporter of Evangelical principles. Never 
held anti-patronage sentiments, but made a high profession of the pi'in- 
ciples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was active in 
their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto ; and in 
that of 1838, the independence resolutions. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1842, 
supported the Claim of Rights. After the Convocation, strongly opposed 
his former friends. 

James Y. Strachan, St James\ Forfar, 1833 

An ultra-professor of ultra-liberal politics, and at one time a delegate to 
some anti-corn law or Chartist or other kindred convention, held in Eng- 
land. Professed to be opposed to patronage, and to be friendly to the 
other principles held by the Evangelical side. 

ILarry Stewart, Oatlilaw, 1836 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally acted with the Evangelical side, but not very decided, and his 
support at all times of a wavering, eccentric desciption, never to be 
reckoned upon. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first 
series of resolutions. 

Vacant. 
Res(*obie. 



XLVII. PRESBYTERY OF DUNDEE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

James Miller, Monikie, 1803 

Robert S. Walker, Loiiolbrgan, 1807 

Robert Aitken, Wlllison Church, Dundei\ 1811 

Charles M'Alister, Gaelic Church, do., 1819 

David Davidson (since dead), Brouqhty Fcny, 1827 

David B. Mellis, Tealing, ^ - ^^^^ 

Waiiani Reid, Chapohhadr, Dundee, 1830 

William Stewart, Lochee, 1832 



ANGUS AND MEARNS. 77 

John Roxburgh, St John's, Dundee, 1834 

Samuel Miller, Monifieth. 1836 

George Lewis, St David's, Dundee, 1837 
James Ewing, assistant and successor, St Andrew'' s, Dundee, 1837 

John Baxter, Hilltoiun, Dundee, 1838 

Patrick Leshe Miller, Wallacetown, Dundee, 1840 

Alexander M'Pherson, Dudhope, 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Archibald M'Lachlan, St Mary's, Dundee, - 1793 

George Addison, D.D., Liff and Benvie, 1803 

David Cannan, D.D., Mains and Strathmartine, 1803 
Alexander M'Neil (many years in a Lunatic Asylum), .SV 

Andrew''^, Dundee, 1806 

Charles Adie, D.D., Greyfrairs, Dundee, 1814 

George Wiiiehouse, Auchterhouse, 1814 

Thomas Irvine, Lundie and FowHs, 1821 

John Currie, Murroes, 1821 

John Spence, Kinnaird, 1825 

David Arnot, St Paul's, Dundee, 1836 

Class Second. 

Jauies Thomson, St Clement's, Dundee, 1802 

Throughout his long incumbency a steady active partizau of the Evan- 
gelical cause, belonging to the extreme section, and for very many 
years the leader of his party in the Presbytery. Throughout the recent 
controversy maintained a high and flaming profession of the great prin- 
ciples at issue, and by his votes and speeches in church courts, and his 
frequent appearances at public meetings, took a prominent share in their 
advocacy. In the Assemblies of 1833-4-5, he supported the veto act, and 
the chapel act, and in the latter year he likewise voted against the 
settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1836, 
he supported the anti-patronage resolutions; and, in 1840, svibscribed 
the solemn Engagement, In the Assembly of 1841, he supported the 
deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, and the Duke of Argyle's bill ; 
and, in that of 1842, he voted for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the 
Claim of Rights. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to 
both series of the resolutions. Some months afterwards, suspicions began 
to be entertained respecting his adherence to his pledges, and in conse- 
quence almost his entire Session resigned, as he failed to satisfy them 
on the point. Thereafter, and so late as 1st April last, he published a 
letter in the Dundee Warder, in which, referring to the report that he 
had withdrawn his concurrence to the proceedings of Convocation, he 
felt it " proper to give it a direct negative," and declared that " he had 
not even in thought swerved from it to this moment." Since the dis- 
ruption, he has been about the most active of all the Residuaries. 

James Wilson, Abernyte, 1808 

Throughout his incumbency a warm and zealous supporter of the Evan- 
gelical cause. Held strenuously the principles of non-intrusion and 



<o ANGUS AND MEARNS. 

spiritual independence ; and, in 1840^ subscribed the declaration against 
Lord Aberdeen's bill. Has of late years, through the pressure of years 
and infirmities, been laid aside from the performance of the active 
duties of the ministry. 

John Adamson Honey, Incbture, 1836 

A flaming professor of extreme popular and liberal principles. Uniformly 
supported the Evangelical side until the crisis was near at hand, when 
he began to difl'er with them on minute points, and to draw oft" from 
them. Was a member of Convocation, but adhered to neither series of 
the resolutions. 

Parish Vacant. 
St Peter's, Dundee, 

By the sudden and universally lamented death of the Rev. Robert Murray 
M'Cheyne, whose praise is in all the churches, and than whom a warmer 
and more devoted friend of Evangelism, and of the Evangelical cause, 
could not well have been found. The Rev. Islay Burns, a Free Church 
minister, had been elected, but not ordained, to the vacancy before the 
disruption. His ordination was the first in connection with the Free 
Church. 



XLIX. — PRESBYTERY OF ARBROATH. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Kirk, Arbirlot, 1824 

John Laird, Inverkeillor, 1835 

James Lumsden, Barry, 1836 

William Wilson, Carmylie, 1837 

Thomas Dymock, Carnoustie, 1837 

Thomas Wilson, Friockheim, 1837 

David Crichton, Inverhrothock, 1838 

Alexander Leshe, Ladyloan, Arbroath, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 
George Walker, Kinnell, - 1813 

John Muir, St Vigeans, 1814 

David Carruthers, Kirkden, 1824 

George Arklay, Guthrie, 1841 

Class Second. 
David Traill, D.D., Panbride, 1794 

Became a decided supporter of the Evangelical cause about the time of 
the famous Marnoch intrusion, and in consequence of that intrusion 
adopted anti-patronage sentiments. Thereafter, presided at an anti- 
yiatronage meeting in his parish, and was present at various public 
meetings in Dundee in behalf of the same cause. 

lloliort Barclay, Lunan, 1821 

Always acted with the Evangelical side. Professed the principles of non- 
intrusion and spiritual indepondcncc, but was candid enough to declare 



ANGUS AND MEARXS. 79 

that he "■ would not suffer for themy Was a member of Convocation, 
and adhered to the first series of resolutions. Repented by the next 
day of having done so, and wished the Clerk privately to withdraw his 
name ; but, as this could not be done, lacked moral resolution to make 
a formal application to that effect. Did not, however, forget to apply 
for and pocket his expenses from the Convocation Fund. 

William Stevenson, Arbroath, 1833 

Always belonged to the Evangelical side, and made a high profession of 
their principles. Entertained the doctrines of non-intrusion and spi- 
ritual independence ; but, in the earlier stages of the controversy, was 
laid aside from his parish and the duties of the ministry by protracted 
indisposition. "Was restored when affairs had assumed a serious aspect, 
and cautiously kept aloof from taking a side with either party, express- 
ing his satisfaction that he could, from a loop-hole, as it were, look forth 
upon the strife without being personally involved in it, just as if he lay 
under no responsibility to God in the matter. Was not a member of 
Convocation ; but, most unexpectedly to all parties, a short time after 
the sittings had terminated, called a meeting of his congregation, and 
addressed them at considerable length on the state of the Church, giving 
them to understand that, should the disruption which appeared to be 
impending take place, and the Evangelical party quit the Establish- 
ment, he could not remain behind them in alliance with Moderatism, 
but expressing at the same time his fears whether the delicate state of 
his health would permit him to undertake the labour of forming a new 
congregation in connection with the Free Church, and suggesting his 
probable retirement into private life, After the disruption, addressed a 
letter to his people expressive of his high satisfaction with the Govern- 
ment bill. 

George Weir, Ahhexj, Arbroath, 1839 

Made a strong profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence, and occasionally took a part in public meetings and 
other demonstrations in their behalf. In 1840, subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and in the Assembly of 1041, voted 
for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of Argyle's 
bill. Since the disruption, has obtained a presentation to the parish of 
Humbie. 



L. — PRESBYTERY OF BRECHIN. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Andrew Fergusson, Marytown, 1795 

James Brewster, D.D., Craig, 1804 

AYilliam Nixon, St John's, Montrose, 1832 

James M'Cosh, First Charge, Brechin, 1835 

Alexander L. E,. Foote, Second Charge, Brechin, 1835 

Mmigo J. Parker, East Kirk, do. 1837 

Kobert Inghs, Edzell, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

David Lycll, Caraldstonc, 1800 

Joseph Patcrson, D,D,, Second Charge, Montrose, 1811 



80 ANGUS AND MEAUNS. 

Eobert Smith, D.D., First Charge, Montrose, 1814 

John Eadie, Dim, 1821 

Thomas Hill, Logiepert, 1824 

William Cron, Menmuir, 1825 

William Gerard, Strickathrow, 1828 

Alexander Todd, Lochlee, 1842 

Class Second. 
David Harris, Fearn, 1803 

Throughout his incumbency a steady and active adherent of the Evangeli- 
cal cause. Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence. In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto; and in 
that of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and 
the Duke of Argyle's bill. Was a member of the Convocation, and ad- 
hered to both series of the resolutions. 

Henry Brewster, Farnwell, 1834 

Generally supported the Evangelical cause, and professed the principles 

of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, but never took very high 

ground in their behalf. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord 

Aberdeen's bill. 

Alexander Gardiner, Letlmot, 1842 

While a preacher, officiated for some time as assistant to Mr Foote of the 
Second Charge, Brechin, during a period of severe domestic affliction, and 
was then remarkable for his avowal of extreme Evangelical principles, 
the keenness with which he on all occasions advocated them, and his 
strong antipathy to Moderatism After his settlement in Lethnot, pro- 
fessed to maintain his original sentiments unchanged, but almost uni- 
formly supported the Moderates. Since the disruption, has obtained 
possession of the pulpit of his former employer, Mr Foote. 



LI. PRESBYTERY OF FORDOUN. 

1. FREE CHURCH. , 

Alexander Keith, D.D., St Cyrus, 1816 

James Glen, Benholm, 1826 

Thomas Brown, Kinneff and CatterHne, ' 1837 

Alexander Keith jun., assistant and successor, St Cyrus, 1840 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James Leslie, D.D., Fordoun, 1788 

George Thomson, Fetteresso, 1800 

James Milne, Arbuthnott, 1814 

James Drummond, Glenbervie, 1815 

Alexander White, Fettercairn, 1817 

John Glegg, Bervie, 1821 

Alexander Irvine, Dunnottar, • 1827 

John Cook, Laurencekirk, 1829 



ANGUS AND MEARNS. 81 

Alexander 0. Low, Marykirk, 1836 

Samuel Traill, assistant and successor, Arbuthnott, 1841 

Class Second. 
John Charles, Garvock, 1821 

Has been prevented for many j^ears from attendance on church courts, by- 
reason of feeble health and advanced age, but was a uniform and steady 
supporter of the Evangelical cause. Held strongly the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was zealous in addressing 
his people and getting up petitions to Parliament on the subject, 

GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF ANGUS AND MEARNS. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Meigle — Ministers seceding, ... 2 

Forfar, „ .... 3 

Dundee, ,, .... 15 

Arbroath, „ .... 8 

Brechin, „ .... 7 

Fordoun, „ .... 4 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, . . 39 

The above number comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, ..... 23 

2. ,, of unendowed do 16 



39 



Class 1 


T. Class L'd. 


11 





5 


4 


10 


3 


4 


4 


8 


3 


. 10 


I 






. 48 


13 




48 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Presbytery of Meigle — Ministers adhering, 
„ Forfar, „ 

„ Dundee, „ . . . 

„ Arbroath, „ 

„ Brechin, „ . . . 

„ Fordoun, „ 

Total of each Class, 



Total of adhering ministers, 63 

The above number comprises — 

1. Ministers of old or endowed parishes. Class 1st, . 47 

„ „ Class 2d, . 13 



2. Ministers of unendowed parishes, Class 1st, . 1 

„ „ Class 2d, . , 2 

— 3 

63 



Vacant Parishes. 

Presbytery of Forfar, 1 

„ Dundee, 1 

Total, 2 



82 ABERDEEN. 

%moXi of ^iaOcfu. 

LII. — PRESBYTERY OF ABERDEEN. 

I. FREE CHUHCH. 

William Primrose, Melville Church, Aberdeen, 1806 

James Footc, East Kirk, do. 1809 

Alexander Black, D.D., Professor of Divinity, Marischal College, 

Aberdeen, 
John Murray, North Kirk, 
Hugh M'Kenzie, Spring Garden, 
David Simpson, Trinity, 
Gavin Parker, Bon-Accord, 
James Bryce, Gilcomston, 
Abercromby L. Gordon, Greyfriars, 
Alexander D. Davidson, West Kirk, 
John Allan, Union, 
Robert Forbes, JVoodsidc, 
Alexander Spence, St Clement's, 
James Stewart,^ South Kirk, 
John Stephen, John Knox's Church, 
William Mitchell, Holhurn Street, 
John Longmuir, Mariners', 
George Moir, New Machar, 
Robert Thomson, Petercultor, 

2. BESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

G. Morrison, D.D., Banchory .Devenick, 1783 

A. J. Forbes, LL.D., Belhelvie, - 1791 

John Leslie, Fintray, 1793 
Duncan Mearns, D.D., Professor of Divinity in King's College, 

Aberdeen, 1798 

P. Forbes, D.D., Old Machar, 1800 

John Bovvei% Maryculter, 1812 

Robert Copland, Durris, 1814 

James Allan, Ncwhills, 1824 

Adam Corbet, Drumoak, 1826 

W. Paul, assistant and successor, Banchory-Dcvcnick 1826 

William R. Pirie, Dyce, 1830 

R. Fiddes, Kinnellar, 1833 

W. Leslie, assistant and successor, Fintrny. 1838 





1816 


Aberdeen, 


1816 


do. 


1822 


do. 


1823 


do. 


1823 


do. 


1824 


do. 


1826 


do. 


1832 


do. 


1832 


do. 


1836 


do. 


1837 


do. 


1838 


do. 


1838 


do. 


1838 


do. 


1840 




1840 




1840 



ABlvRDEEX, 83 



Class Second. 



Baniel Dewar, D.D., and LL.D., Principal and Professor of 

Cliurcli History in Marisclial College, Aberdeen, 1810 

One of the most marked and prominent of all the supporters of the Evange- 
lical cause, constantly putting himself forward as a leader in their counsels, 
and extending an unfaltering advocacy with tongue and pen to all their 
measures. Made a very high and ultra profession of the principles of 
non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In the Assemblies of 1033-4-5, 
supported the admission of the chapel ministers, and the veto act ; and, 
in the last-mentioned Assembly, voted against the settlement of the pre- 
sentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1838, supported the Inde- 
pendence resolutions; and in 1040, opposed Lord Aberdeen's bill, and 
subscribed the solemn Engagement. Likewise in the same year, sup- 
ported the suspension of the majority of the Presbytery of Strathbogie ; 
and then, and after their ultimate deposition, took an active part in preach- 
ing in their parishes, in enlightening the people as to the nature of the 
controversy, and in stirring them up to adherence to the Church. Also 
took a leading and prominent share in all the public movements in Aber- 
deen, &c., in relation to the controversy, throughout its whole course. In 
the Assembly of 1841 , voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, 
the D.txke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership ; and 
in that of 1842, for the anti-patronage resolutions, and the Claim of 
Rights. Subscribed the circular summoning the Convocation — was pre- 
sent, and adhered to the first series of the resolutions, but left for his 
estate in the Carse of Gowrie before the vote was taken upon the se- 
cond. After the disruption, made his appearance in the Free Assemblj', 
and found his way to a pi'ominent seat on the platform, amidst the ap- 
plause of the audience, but did not subscribe the deed of demission. 
Thereafter, see-sawed and hesitated for months betwixt the Free 
Church and the Establishment, now preaching for a minister of the one, 
next occupying a pulpit in the other, but finally settling down as a Re- 
siduary. The following is a copy of the letter in which he communicated 
his resolution to that effect to the Residuary Presbytery of Aberdeen : — 

OvEununDiE, EnKOL,20th S.pt. ISIS. 

Rev. and Dear Sir,— In reply to your ktti r, containin;^ an extract of a minute of the 
Presbytery of Aberdeen, I beg leave, through you, most respectfully to state to the 
Presbytery, that I have not adhered to the Protest of the seceding ministers, nor signed 
any document whatever similar to the Protest: That I have not withdrawn from the 
Established Church of Scotland, uor from attending on its worship and ordinances: 
And, still further, that I have not joined myself to the body of separatists acting under 
«aid Protest.— I remain. Rev. and Dear Sir, your most obedient servant, 

(Si?;ned) D. Dewar. 

Tlie Rev. William Paul, 

Clerk of the Presbytery of Aherd.-en. 

Eobert Smith, Old Macliar, 1821 

Long an active and zealous yjartizan of the Evangelical cause, belong- 
ing to the extreme section. Was one of the warmest opponents of 
patronage, at a time when there were but few of his sentiments in the 
Church ; and some years after his ordination, brought into the Assembly 
an overture from the Presbytery of Irvine against it. Made a strong 
profession of the principles of non-iutrusion and spiritual independence, 
and was a strenuous advocate of the veto and the cliapel acts. As the 
controversy thickened, gradually drew off, and became estranged from his 
former friends ; and after the decision of the Stewarton case, in spring 
1843, voted with the Moderates in presbytery and synod for the ejection 
of the 7'/-'.:;./ sacra brethren from thoir seats. 



84 ABERDEEN. 

Georj^e M'Kenzie, Skene, 1824 

Professed the principles of non-intrusioa and epiritual independence, but 
not very strongly, and never lent more than a timid and hesitating sup- 
port to the measures of the Evangelical side. In 1040, subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Latterly eschewed any share 
in ecclesiastical movements. 

Alexander Thorn, Nigg, 1826 

Maintained strongly the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence; and in the Assembly of 1838, voted for the independence re- 
solutions. Was a faithful and steady adherent of the Evangelical cause, 
but was latterly in a very feeble state of health. At the time of the 
disruption, was on his death-bed, and only survived it a few weeks. Had 
he been spared, there is little doubt that he would have joined the Free 
Church. 



LIII. — PRESBYTERY OF KINCARDINE O NEIL. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

William Anderson, Bancliory-Ternan, 1830 

James M'Gown, Bankhead, 1832 

David Scott Fergusson, Strachan, 1836 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Hugh Burgess, Glenmuick, 1799 

John Roger, Kincardine O'Neil, 1799 

Andrew Watson, Tarland and Migvie, 1799 

Robert Mihie Miller, Aboyne, 1810 

William Ingram, Edit, 1810 

John Fraser, Cluny, 1814 

John M'Hardy, Logie and Coldstone, 1816 

Charles M'Combie, Lumphanan, . 1826 

J. Watson, assistant and successor, Tarland and ^ligvie, 1829 

Archibald Anderson, Crathie and Braemar, 1832 

George Cook, Midmar, 1837 

Class Second. 
George Smith, Birse, 1824 

Professed the principles of non -intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. In the Assembly of 
1835, voted for the veto act and the chapel act, and against the settle- 
ment of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the de- 
claration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. As the controversy thickened, 
and its aspects grew serious, gradually drew off from his former friends. 

WilHam Campbell Coull, 1824 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
occasionally voted in support of them in Presbyteries and Synods, but 
never took any decided or prominent part in the controversy. 



ABERDEEN. 85 

LIV. PRESBYTERY OF ALFORD. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

None. 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Clast First. 

James Paull, Tullynessle, 1B05 

Kobert Scott, Glenbucket, 1808 

J. Farquharson, LL.D., Alford, 1812 

Alexander Reid, Kildrummy, 1812 

Robert Cook, Clatt, 1820 

James Gordon, Cabracli, 1827 

James Gillon, Tough, 1828 

E. Meiklejohn, Strathdon, 1830 

William Minty, Kinethmont, 1831 

William Reid, Auchindoir, 1834 

Alexander Low, Keig, 1834 

Alexander Taylor, Leocliel and Cushnie, 1839 

R. Lindsay, LL.D., Towie, 1840 

Class Second. 
None. 

LV. — PRESBYTERY OF GARIOCH. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Henry Simson, Chapel-of-Garioch, 1817 

George Garioch, Old Meldrum, 1817 

Robert Simpson, Kintore, 1833 

David Simson, Oyne, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Robert Lessel, Inverury, 1800 

Ferdinand Ellis, Culsalmond, 1801 

Robert Forbes, Monymusk, 1814 

Alexander Cushny, Rayne, 1815 

Patrick Davidson, Insch, 1822 

John Wilson, Premnay, 1824 

James Bisset, Bourtie, 1826 

Thomas Burnett, Daviot, 1829 

James Peter, Leslie, 1830 



86 ABERDEEN, 

R,. Cuslmy, assistant and successor, Inscli, 1836 

Geoi'sTC Peter, Kemnay, • 1839 

Class Second. 
John Keith, Keith-hall and Kinkell, 1822 

A keen partizan of the Evangelical cause, and fievce against Moderatism. 
Held anti-patronage sentiments, and belonged to the extreme section. 
In the Assembly of 1C35, supported the veto act and the chapel actj 
and, in that of 1838, voted for the Independence resolutions. Uniformly 
and zealously supported his party in all their measures up to the Con- 
vocation. 

Vacant 
Blairdaf. 

N, B. "William Middleton was intruded by the majority of the Presbytery 
as assistant and successor at Culsalmond, but his settlement was reversed 
by the General Assembly of 1842. 



LVI. PRESBYTERY OF ELLON, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander Philip, Cruden, 1836 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

John LesHe, Udney, 1813 

George Cruden, Logie-Buchan, 1817 

James Robertson, Ellon, 1832 

Francis Knox, Tarves, 1833 

William S. Watt, Foveran, 1840 

James Rust, Slains, * 1840 

Class Second. 
James White, Methhc, ' 1838 



Formerly of Chalmers' Church, Glasgow. While in that charge _ 

the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly 
supported the Evangelical side in all their measures. Since his settle- 
ment at Methlic has relapsed into Moderatism. 



-PRESBYTERY OF DEER, 

I. FREE CHURCH. 



J lindcrson, St Fergus, 



1822 



James Yuill, East Church, Petcrhca.], 1835 



ABERDEEN. 87 

2, RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First, 

William Cock, Rathen, 17&5 

Alexander Simpson, Strichen, 1807 

G. Gardiner, Aberdour, 1810 

Charles Gibbon, Lonmay, 1810 

William Donald, Peterhead, 1816 

J. Morrison, Old Deer, 1822 

James Welsh, New Deer, 1830 

John Sharp, New Piuligo, 1837 

James Cruden, Tyrie, 1842 

J. Cock, assistant and successor, Rathven, 1842 

Class Second. 
John Cumming, Fraserburgh, 1815 

A steady adherent of the Evangelical side, maintaining anti-patronage 
views, and belonging to the extreme section. In the Assembly of 1833, 
he supported the chapel act and the veto ; in that of 183G, he voted for 
the anti-patronage resolutions ; and, in that of 1841, for the deposition 
of the Strathbogie recusants, the Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular 
election of the eldership. During the progress of the controversy he 
was at much pains to enlighten his people with respect to it by frequent 
meetings and vehement appeals, the diffusion of tracts, &c., and, as the 
disruption has proved, was wonderfully successful in his eiForts. He 
was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both scries of resolutions, 
and up to the last expressed his determination to secede. 

Edward Hume, PitsHgo, 1829 

A steady adherent of the Evangelical side, made a stout profession of the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and, like his 
co-presbyter, Mr Cumming, v^^as throughout the controversy most inde- 
fatigable in stirring up his people with respect to it. In the Assembly 
of 1835, he supported the chapel act and the veto act ; and, in 18-10, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Was a mem- 
ber of Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions, and to 
the very last continued to support all the measures of his party. 

John Imray, Longslde, 1830 

A flaming professor of the principles of the Evangelical cause, hold- 
ing anti-patronage views, and belonging to the extreme section. In 
1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill; and 
throughout tlie whole controversy was most active and zealous in incul- 
cating his principles upon his people, both from the pidpit and the plat* 
form. Was not a member of Convocation, but continued after it to 
support his party in all their measures, and gave it to be understood that 
he was determined to withdraw with his brethren from the Establishment. 

Alexander Boyd, Crimond, 1840 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
lent a general, but cautious and guarded, support to the measures of the 
Evangelical side. 



88 ABDllDEEN. 

LVin. — PRESBYTERY OF TURRIFF. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Gilbert Brown, Newbyth, 1816 

Joseph Thorburn, Forglen, 1829 

John Manson, Fyvie, 1829 

Hugh Gordon, Monquhitter, 1829 

Wilham Garden Blaikie, Drumblade, 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James Milne, Inverkeithing, 1809 

James Cruickshank, Turriff, 1816 

Thomas Wilson, Gamrie, 1818 

William Findlay, King Edward, 1826 

Andrew Todd, Alvah, 1841 

Class Second. 

G. Dingwall, Auchterless, 1811 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 
the Assembly of 1835, voted in favour of the chapel act, and the veto 
act. Was not a member of Convocation, but continued to extend an un- 
wavering support in church courts to all the measures of the Evangeli- 
cal side up to the disruption. 

James Cordiner, Forgue, 1834 

A steady and zealous adherent of the Evangelical cause. Maintained the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and was indefa- 
tigable in advocating them throughout the country. In the Assembly 
of 1841, voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, for the 
Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership. Was 
a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. 
Now affirms Lord Aberdeen's bill to be everything that any reasonable 
man could desire. 



LIX. — PRESBYTERY OF F0RDYCE. 




1. FREE 


; CHURCH. 




George Innes, Deskford, 




1808 


Francis W. Grant, Banff, 




1816 


Alexander Reid, Portsoy, 




1829 


Alexander Anderson, Boyndie, 




1830 


Robert Shanks, Buckie, 




1837 


George Innes junior, Seafield, 




1843 


2. RESIDUARY 


ESTABLISHMENT. 




Class First. 




James Leslie, Enzie, 




1824 


James Gardiner, Rathven, 




1825 



ABERDKKN. 89 

George Henderson, Cullen, 1829 

L. W. Grant, OrdiquhiU, 1833 

Class Second. 

John Innes, Fordyce, 1825 

A steady and zealous adherent of the Evangelical cause. Made a high 
profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. 
In the Assembly of 1834, supported the veto and the chapel act ; and, in 
1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. In the 
Assembly of 1842, supported the Claim of Rights. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. So late as 
March 1843, gave attendance on meetings of the Provisional Committee 
for making preparations for the disruption, and declared his intention 
of retiring from the Establishment if the principles of the Convocation 
should not be legalized j and, by his whole arrangements previous to 
the Assembly, gave indication of a fixed determination to withdraw. 
Subsequently to the disruption, solicited and obtained the presentation 
to Deskford, a smaller benefice, but with a population only half as 
numerous as Fordyce ; but again abandoned it, and remains in For- 
dyce. 

GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF ABERDEEN. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Pre-sbytery of Aberdeen — Ministers seceding. , , .19 

„ Kincardine O'Neil, „ ... 3 

„ Alford, „ ... 

„ Garioch, „ ... 4 

Ellon, „ ... 1 

„ Deer, „ ... 2 

Turiff, „ ... 5 



„ Fordyce, „ 






6 


Total of Free Church ministers in 


Synod, 




40 


The above total comprises — 








1. Ministers of endowed parishes. 






26 


2. „ of unendowed do., 






. 14 
—40 


RESIDUARY EST.\BLISHMENT. 










Class Ist. 


Class 2d. 


Presbytery of Aberdeen — ministers adhering. 




13 


4 


„ Kincardine O'Neil, „ 




11 


2 


„ Alford, 




13 





„ Garioch, „ 




11 


1 


Ellon, 


. 


6 


1 


„ Deer, ,, 


, 


10 


4 


„ Turiff, „ 


, 


5 


2 


Fordyce, 




4 


1 


Total adhering of each Class, 




73 


15 
73 


Togetlicr, 






8B 



90 MORAY. 

The above number corapiises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes^ class i, . . 71 

Do. Do. class 2, . .15 



06 
2 
~ 08 



Do. of unendowed parishes, Cla.s3 First, . 

Parioh Vacant. 
Presbytery of Garioch, 



SmioO of i^ovay. 



LX. — PRESBYTERY OF STRATHBOGIE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Robertson, Gartly, 1819 

David Henry, Aberchirder, 1834 

David Dewav, Bellie, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
None. 

Class Second. 

William Duff, Grange, 1822 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
throughout the whole of the trying scenes of the controversy, of which 
this Presbytery was in so especial a manner the battle ground, uni- 
formly supported the Evangelical side, and acted and voted with 
them in all their measures, rendered necessary by the proceedings of 
the ci%'il courts, in their endeavour to coerce the Church into an aban- 
donment of her discipline against the Moderate majority of this Presby- 
tery. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's 
bill. Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both scries of 
the resolutions. A few days after the disruption, was called up to the 
bar of the Court of Session, along M-ith his co-presbyters the Rev. Messrs 
Robertson (Gartly), Dewar (Bellie), Henry (Aberchirder), and Leith 
(Rothiemay) ; and the Rev. Messrs Davidson and Simpson ; with Pro- 
fessor Brown of Marischal College, Aberdeen, the Rev. C. J. Brown of 
Edinburgh, and Dr Smyttan, elder, members of the Assembly's Special 
Commission, to receive sentence for having proceeded with the settle- 
ment of Mr Henry at Aberchirder or Now Slarnocb, in the face of an 
interdict. A separate statement then given in for Messrs Duff and 
Leith was the first intimation of their intention to remain in the Esta- 
blishment. 

Harry Leith, Eothiemay, ■ 1822 

Is to to be placed in all respects in the same category as Mr Duff. Like 
him he subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and 



MORAY. 91 

butli series of the Convocation resolutions ; participated in all tlie mea- 
sures of the Evangelical side, and ultimatelj- united with him in the 
separate statement before refen-ed to. 

Parishes vacant. 
Botriphiiie, Cainiie, Glass, Huntly, Keith, Mainoch, Mortlach, and 
Rhyiiie, by the deposition of Messrs Masson, Cowie, Walker, Thom- 
son, Crnickshanlv, and Allardyce, and the withdrawal of the licenses 
of Messrs Edwards and Duo-uid, 



LXI. — PRESBYTERY OF ABERNETIIY. 

1, FREE CHURCH. 

George Shepherd, Kingussie, 1818 

Alexander TuUoch, Kirmichael, 1820 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
John Macdonald, Alvie, 1806 

WiUiam Grant, Duthill, 1812 

Class Second. 
Charles M'Pherson, Tomintoul, P. 1827 

Maintained the principles of non -intrusion and spiritual independence 
inclining to anti-patronage views. In the Assembly of 1834, he sup- 
ported the veto and the chapel acts ; and in 1040, subscribed the 
declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Up to the time of the Convo- 
cation, he was a most zealous, active, and determined supporter of the 
Evangelical side in all their measures ^ 

James Grant, Cromdale, 1830 

Made a keen profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence; and in the Assembly of 1835, supported the chapel act, 
and opposed the settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. Up to the 
time of the Convocation, uniformly acted and voted with the Evange- 
lical side in all their measures. 

Charles Grant, Kothiemurchus, P. 1830 

Made a very high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spi- 
ritual independence, and held at one time a newspaper controversy with 
the minister of Alvie, in which, amongst other things, he advocated the 
call, instead of the veto, contending stoutly that the latter fell far short 
of the people's just rights. Up to the time of the Convocation, uni- 
formly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures. Since the 
disruption, has obtained a presentation to Kingussie. 

Lewis M'Pherson, Inch, P. 1837 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. * 

James Stewart, Abernethy, 1838 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and uniformly supported the Evangelical side. 



92 



LXII. PRESBYTERY OF ABERLOUR. 



1. FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander M'Watt, Rotlios, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Lewis W. Forbes, Boharm, 1816 

William Asher, Inveraven, 1826 

John Wink, Knockando, 1840 

Class Second. 

None. 

Vacant. 

Aberloiir. 



LXIII. PRESBYTERY OF FORRES, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

William Robertson, Kinloss, 1813 

Duncan Grant, Forres, 1814 

Mark Aitken, Dyke, 1816 

(xcorge Mackay, RafFord, 1816 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
None. 

Class Second. 

William Tullocb, Dallas, 1822 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence ; and 
in 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill, Ge- 
nerally voted in church courts with the Evangelical side, 

Peter Farries, Edinkillie, ' 1828 

JIade a flaming and ultra profession of the principles of non-intrusion and 
spii'itual independence, and was most vehement and indefatigable in 
their advocacy. In the Assembly of 1832, he supported the overtures on 
calls; in that of 1835, the veto ; and in that of 1842, he voted for the 
Claim of Rights. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to 
both scries of the resolutions; and after his return home, was most active 
in his parish in procuring adherents amongst his parishioners, and in 
setting into operation a sustentation association under Dr Chalmers' 
scheme. AVas in Edinburgh at the the time of the disruption ; and a 
day or two after, published a curious letter in the Witness, intimating 
his intention to remain in the Establishment for a time at least. There- 
upon, returned immediately home ; but on ascertaining, it is presumed, 
the state of feeling in his parish, again set out for Edinburgh, but stopped 
short on the wav, and once more returned home. 



Moray. 9'S 

LXIV. PRESBYTERY OF ELGIN'. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander Gentle, Alves, 1828 

Alexandei' Topp, First Charge, Elgin, 1838 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Richard Rose, D.D., Drainy, 1794 

Alexander Walker, Urquhart, 1805 

Alexander Simpson, New Spynie, 1826 

Alexander Brander Duffus, 1828 

John Gordon, Spey mouth, 1829 

George Gordon, Birnie, 1832 

John Walker, St Andrews-Lhanbride, 1839 

Francis Wylie, Second Charge, Elgin, 1842 

Class Second. 
None. 



LXV. — PRESBYTERY OF INVERNESS. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Archibald Cook, North Kirk, Inverness, 1823 

Alexander Eraser, Kirkhill, 1828 

John Grant, Petty, 1834 

Thomas M'Lachlan, assistant and successor, Moy, 1838 

David Sutherland East Kirk, Inverness, 1 839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Alexander Rose, D.D., Second Charge, Inverness, 1795 
James M'Lauchlan, Moy, 1795 
Colin Eraser, Kiltarlity, 1810 
David Eraser, Dores, ' 1821 
Donald Macdonald, assistant and successor. Second Cliarge, In- 
verness, 1842 
Class Second. 
Alexander Clark, Second Charge, Inverness, 1822 

Immortalized as the hero of the editor of the Wi/nes.^'s able article, " The 
Two Mr Clarks ; " a flaming professor of spiritual independence, and 
holding non-intrusion, merely as a step towards the optimism of the entire 
abolition of patronage. In the earlier stages of the controA-ersy, preached 



94 MORAY. 

and printed sermons, and made many platform speeches, advocating 
these principles in the strongest and keenest style, and for years dunned 
]tresbyteries and sj^nods with his motions and resolutions in their behalf. 
In the General Assembly of 1833, he supported the admission of the 
chapel ministers, and the overtures on calls, and led the discussion 
against patronage. In the Assemblies of 1834 and 1835, he supported 
the veto act and the chapel act; and, in the latter Assembly, he like- 
wise voted in favour of the anti-patronage resolutions, and against the 
settlement of the presentee to Auchterarder. In the Assembly of 1836, 
he again voted for the anti-patronage resolutions ; and he continued the 
same unwavering and strenuous support of the Evangelical party and 
their measures down to 1841. In the Assembly of that year he tirst gave 
token of change. While he recorded his vote for the Duke of Argyle's 
bill, and the popular election of the eldership, and concurred in finding 
the relevancy of the libel against the Strathbogie recusants, he opposed 
the sentence of deposition, and made a motion, which he found no one 
to support, with the exception of the resi)eclable and sagacious Mr Tod 
Brown of Dunfermline, that it should be modified to suspension sine die. 
From that hour he may be said to have broken loose from the Evan- 
gelical side. Shortly after his return home, he denounced at a political 
dinner the Evangelical leaders as men who were seeking, "in the 
desperation of human pride, to overthrow the Establishment ; " and 
latterly became as zealous in using the pulpit and the press to denounce 
his former principles, as ever he was in supporting them. 

Simon M'Intosh, Third Chai-ge, Inverness, 1842 

One of the vetoed presentees to Daviot. Previous to his obtaining the 
presentation to Daviot, used to be reckoned as belonging to the Evan- 
gelical side, and to profess non-intrusion principles. After bis settle- 
ment at Inverness, maintained a strict neutrality until the approach of 
the disruption, which perfectly removed all the indecision under which 
he had i^reviously laboured. Since then, has obtained the presentation 
to one of the Aberdeen city charges. 

Vacant. 
Daviot. 



LXVI. — rRESBYTERY OF NAIRN, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

William Barclay, Auldearn, 1814 

Simon F. M'Lauchlan, Cawder, 1833 

John Matheson, Ardei^sier, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
James Grant, Nairn, 1815 

Alexander Campbell, Croy, 1820 

Class Second. 
Hugh Macbcan, Ardclacl!, 1812 • 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and si>iritMal iiidepcndciico, and 
gpi\orally voted with tlie Evangelical side. 



ROSS. 



95 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF MORAY 



FREE CHURCH. 

Presbj'tery of Strathbogie — Ministers seceding, 

„ Abernethy, „ 

„ Aberlour, „ 

„ Forres, „ 

Elgin, 

„ Inverness, „ 

„ Nairn, „ 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 

The above total comprises^ — ■ 

L Ministers of endowed parishes, 
2. ,, unendowed do. 



17 



20 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 









Class Ist. 


Class 


Presbytery 


of Strathbogie- 


-Ministers adhering, 





2 


„ 


Abernethy, 


,, 


. 2 


5 


^^ 


Aberlour, 


>} 


3 





^j 


Forres, 


}i 


. 


2 


^j 


Elgin, 


» 


8 





jj 


Inverness, 


>} 


5 


2 


„ 


Nairn, 


„ 


2 


1 




Total of each class, 


. 20 


12 










20 



The above are all ministers of endowed parishe 

Parishes vacant. 
Presbytery of Strathbogie, .... 

„ Aberlour, ..... 

Inverness, .... 



^j>ttoIi Of moss. 



LXVII. — PRESBYTERY OF CIIANONRY, 



10 



I, FREE CHURCH. 

Donald Sage, Kirkmichael, otherwise Rcsolis, 
Alexander Stewart, Cromarty, 
Jolm Macrae, Knockbain, 



1816 
1824 
1833 



<)G ROSS. 

Simon Frasei-, Fortrose, 1835 

Donald Kennedy, Killearnan, 1838 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
James Gibson, Avoch, 1831 

Class Second. 
Alexander Wood, Rosemarkie, 1815 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 
the Assembly of 1 832, supported the overtures on calls ; and in that of 
1835, voted for the veto act and the chapel act, and opposed the settle- 
ment of the presentee to Auchterarder. In 1840, subscribed the declara- 
tion against Lord Aberdeen's bill, and continued his support of the 
Evangelical cause, in a greater or less degree, to the last. 

John Mackenzie, Oaelic Church, Ci-omarty, 1833 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
generally acted and voted with the Evangelical side. 



LXVIII. PRESBYTERY OF DINGWALL. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Macdonald, D.D., Urquhart, 1806 

Alexander Flvter, Alness 1811 

John M'Kenzie, Carnoch, P. 1829 

James Macdonald, UiTay, 1830 

John Noble, Fodderty, ' 1833 

Duncan Campbell, Kiltearn, 1834 

George M'Leod, Maryhurgh, 1841 

Alexander Anderson, Keanloch-Luichart, P. 1842 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHStENT. 

Class First. 

Simon Fraser, Kilmorack, 1806 

Charles Downie, Contin, ^ 1826 

Class Second. 

Hector Bethune, Dingwall, 1802 

Gave an irregular but not very hearty support to the Evangelical cause. 
Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence ; 

and about a year ago, seconded an overture against patronage in the 
Synod of Ross. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill, and the solemn Engagement. Was a member of Convoca- 
tion, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 



LXIX. PRESBYTERY OF TAIN. 

1 . FREE CHURCH. 

David Carment, Roskeen, 1810 

Charles Ross, Matheson, Kilmnir-Easter, 1812 



ROSS. 97 

Hector Allan, Kincardine, 1818 

Donald Gordon, Eddertoun, 1822 

John Macalister, Nigg, 1824 

Charles Calder, Macintosh, Tain, 1828 

David Campbell, Tarbat, 1832 

Hugh M'Leod, Logie-Easter, 1833 

Gustavus Aird, Croick, P. 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Hugh Ross, Fearn, 1799 

Class Second. 

None. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF ROSS. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Chanonry, ministers seceding, . . 5 

„ Dingwall, „ ... 8 

,. Tain, „ ... 9 

Total of Free Church ministers iu Synod, . 22 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes, ... 20 

2. „ of unendowed do,, .... 2 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 
Presbytery of Chanonry, ministers adhering, . 1 2 

„ Dingwall, „ ..21 

„ Tain, „ ,10 

Total of each Class, ..43 

4 

Total of adhering ministers, ... 7 

The above total comprises — 

1. Ministers of endowed parishes. Class 1 , . . 4 

Class 2. . 2 



2. Minister of unendowed parish, Class 2, . .1 

7 



98 SUTHERLAND AND CAITHNESS. 

SgttotJ Of ^ttti)etlanti anU Caitfinesft. 

LXX. — PRESBYTERY OF DORNOCH. 

1. FKEE CHURCH. 

Duncan M'Gillivray, Lairg, I8OI 

Angus Kennedy, Dornoch, 1802 

Charles Gordon, Assynt, 1825 

George Mackay, Clyne, 1828 

Patrick Davidson, Stoer, 1830 

George Kennedy, assistant and successor, Dornoch, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Murdo Cameron, Criech, 1799 

Donald Ross, Loth, 1806 

Alexander M'Pherson, Golspie, 1817 

John M'Kenzie, Rogart, 1818 

Class Secmid. 

James Campbell, Kildonan, 1824 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independencCj 
and generally supported the Evangelical cause. Was a member of 
Convocation, and adhered to the first series of resolutions. 

LXXI. — PRESBYTERY OF TONGUE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Hugh M'Kay Mackenzie, Tongue, 1796 

William Findlater, Duirness, 1808 

David Mackenzie, Farr, ' 1813 

George Tulloch, Edrachillis, 1829 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

None. 

Class Second. 
Robert Clarke, Kinlochbervie, P. 1819 

Strenuously maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence, and zealously supported the Evangelical side, in all their 
measures, up to the very last. Was a member of Convocation, and ad- 
hered to the first series of resolutions. 



SUTHERLAND AND CAITHNESS. 99 

David Sutherland, Strathy, P. 1841 

Entertained anti-patronage sentiments, and generally made a very high 
and full profession of the principles of the Evangelical side, and ex- 
tended an unwavering support to all their measures, up to the very last. 
Was a member of Convocation, and adhered to both series of the reso- 
lutions, and subsequently was very active and successful in procuring 
adherences amongst his j)arishioners. A short time before the disruption, 
intimated publicly to his congregation his intention of adhering to the 
Establishment, and, under cover of the Stewarton decision, renounced 
his attendance on church courts. After all, makes a strenuous dis- 
avowal of Moderatism, while he acts cordially with the party in all 
things, not excepting their proceedings against his more faithful and 
self-sacrificing brethren. 



LXXIT. — PRESBYTERY OF CAITHNESS. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John Munro, Halkirk, 1806 

Finlay Cook, Reay, 1817 

George Davidson, Latheron, 1819 

William M'Kenzie, Olrick, 1819 

Charles Thomson, Wick, 1823 

Walter Ross Taylor, Thurso, 1829 

Thomas Gunn, Keiss, P. 1829 

Samuel Campbell, Berriedale, P. 1837 

Alexander Gunn, Watten, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Thomas Jolly, Dunnet, 1784 

William Smith, Bower, 1789 

Class Second. 
Peter Jolly, Canisbay, 1833 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
constantly supported the Evangelical side in all their measures up to 
the Convocation, which he did not attend. 

Parishes Vacant. 
Lyhster. 
Pultneiftown, Wick. 

GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF SUTHERLAND AND CAITHNESS. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Dornoch — Ministers seceding, . . 6 

„ Tongue, „ ... 4 

„ Caithness, „ ... 9 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, . .10 

The above all ministers of endowed parishes. 



100 GLENELG. 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 
Presbytery of Dornoch — Ministers adhering, , 4 1 

„ Tongue, „ . , 2 

„ Caithness, „ . . 2 1 

Total of each class, . . 6 4 

6 

Total of adhering ministers, . . 10 

The above all ministers of endowed parishes. 

Parishes Vacant. 
Presbytery of Caithness, ..... 2 



Sgnoti of ®len$lg. 



LXXIII. — PRESBYTERY OF LOCHCARROX. 

I. FREE CHURCH. 

Thomas Ross, LL.D. (since dead), Lochbroom, 1798 

Alexander Macdonald, Plockton, P. 1826 

Colin M'Kenzie, Shieldag, P. 1827 

Donald Macrae, Poolewe, P. 1830 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Roderick Macrae, Applecross, 1793 

James Russell, Gairloch, 1802 

John M'Kenzie, Lochcarron, 1806 

Alexander Ross, Ullapool, P. . 1819 

Hector M'Lean, Lochalsh, 1821 

John Maci-ae, Glenelg, 1824 

Class Second. 
James Morison, Kintail, 1825 

Made a very high profession of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual 
independence. In 1840, subscribed the declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's bill; and in the Assembly of 1842, voted for the anti-patronage 
resolutions and the Claim of Rights. Extended an unwavering support 
to all the measures of the Evangelical side until the period of the Con- 
vocation. 

Farquhar M'lver, Glensheil, 1833 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. In the Assembly of 1841, 
voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants and the Duke of 
Argyle's bill. _ 



GLENELG, 101 

LXXIV. — PRESBYTERY OF ABERTARFF. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

John M'Millan, Ballahulish and Corran, P. 1828 

Thomas Davidson, Kilmalie, 1829 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James Doune Smith, Urquhart, 1805 

John M'Intyre, Kihnonivaig, 1824 

Donald Chisholm, Boleskine, 1829 

Class Second. 
Donald Cameron, Laggan, 182i 

A keen and zealous partizan of the Evangelical side in all their measures, 
and a leader amongst them in presbytery and synod. He entertained 
anti-patronage principles; and, in the Assembly of 1834, he supported 
the veto and the chapel act. Again, in that of 1838, he voted for the 
independence resolutions; and, in 1840, he subscribed the solemn En- 
gagement. He was a member of Convocation, and adhered to the first 
series of resolutions, and continued his support of Evangelical measures 
down to the very last. At the time of the disruption he was placed in 
rather peculiar circumstances in regard to an action for augmentation of 
stipend, which he was pursuing against his heritors, and which, after 
long dependence, was almost ripe for a decision, on which large expenses 
hung. 



LXXV. — PRESBYTERY OF SKYE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Roderick M'Leod, Snizort, 1823 

John R. Glass, Bracadale, 1829 

John Swanson, Small Isles, 1839 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Coll M'Donald, Portree, 1811 

John M'Kinnon, Strath, 1812 

Robert M'Gregor, Kilmuir, 1822 

Alexander M' Tver, Sleat, 1826 

Roderick Reid, Hallin in Waternish, P. 1829 

Henry Beatson, Stenscholl, P. 1838 

Class Second, 

Angus Martin, Duirnish, 1842 

A very keen partizan of the Evangelical cause, and a strenuous assertor 
of anti-patronage principles. So decided a non-intrusionist that, when 



102 GLENELG. 

ia the course of his settlement, the Moderate majority of the Presbytery 
shewed a disposition to set aside the veto regulations, after consulting 
with the Procurator of the Church, he gave in a paper expressive of his 
adherence to that law, and of his wish to be settled accorc^ng to its pro- 
visions. He was not present at the Convocation, but sent a letter of 
apology, and about two months after it gave in his adherence to the first 
series of resolutions. Now a very strong opponent of his old friends ; 
and in jsreaching the church of Bracadale vacant, selected for his text, 
1 John, 2dchai}. 19th verse, " They went out from us, but they were not 
of us," &c., — certainly a great and palpable truth, even in its accommo- 
dation. 



LXXVI. — PRESBYTERY OF UIST, 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

Norman M'Leod, Tmmisgarry, P. 1835 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Alexander Nicolson, Barra, 1796 

Roderick M'Lean, South Uist, 1807 

Finlay, M'Rae, North Uist, 1816 

John Bethune, Bernera, P. 1820 

John M'lver, Harris, 1832 

Class Second. 
None. 



LXXVII. — PRESBYTERY OF LEWIS. 

1 . FREE CHURCH. 

Alexander M'Leod, Uig, 1819 

Robert Finlayson, Lochs, 1829 

John Finlay, Cross, P. (date of ordination uncertain, but not 

later than mentioned), 1840 

Duncan Mathison, Knock, P. 1841 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
William Macrae, Barvas, 1801 

John Cameron, Stornoway, 1825 

Class Second. 
Noiie. 



ORKNEY. 
GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF GLENELG. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Lochcarron, ministers seceding, 

„ Abertarff, „ ... 

„ Skye, 

„ Uist, „ ... 

„ Lewis, „ 

Total of Free Church ministers in Synod, 

All ministers of endowed parishes. 



103 



RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Presbytery of Lochcarron, ministers adhering, 
„ Abertarff, „ 

„ Siiye, „ 

„ Uist, „ 

„ Lewis, „ 

Total of each Class, 
Together, 



Class 1st. Class 2d. 
6 2 



SmiotJ of (Srfeneg. 



LXXVIII. — PRESBYTERY OF KIRKWALL. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

James Smellie, St Andrews, 

Peter Petrie, Second Charge, Kirkwall, 

Adam Rettie, assistant and successor, Evie and Kendall, 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Andrew Smith, Holme, 



1805 
1831 
1841 



1799 



Class Second. 
John Gerard, South Ronaldshay, 1805 

Made a very high and full profession of the principles of Evangelism, and 
was a keen assertor of the doctrines of non-intrusion and spiritua. in- 
dependence. Uniformly and strenuously supported the Evangelical 
side in all their measures, up to the Convocation, which he did not at- 
tend ; and, in May last, he voted in Synod for an overture to repeal 
the veto. 



William Looic, First Charge, Kirkwall, 



1815 



Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
gave a general support to the measures of the Evangelical side, up to 



104 ORKNEY. 

the Convocation^ which he did not attend. In 1836, he voted in Pres- 
bytery for an overture, calling upon the Assembly to adopt the full 
call ; and, like his co-presbyter, Mr Gerard, voted in Synod in May last 
for the repeal of the veto. 

David Pitcairn, Evie and Kendall, 1830 

Made a very full profession of the principles of Evangelism, and was most 
earnest and ultra in his assertion of the principles of non-intrusion and 
spiritual independence. In 1836, he moved in the Presbytery the over- 
ture in favour of the call above mentioned, and was constant in his ap- 
pi'oval and support of all the measures of the Evangelical party. For 
some years back he has been resident in England, on account of bad 
health, and did not adhere to the resolutions of Convocation. 

Thomas Waugh, Deerness, P. 1830 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly supported the Evangelical cause. 



LXXIX. — PRESBYTERY OF CAIRSTON. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

William Malcolm, Firth and Stennis, 1807 

Peter Leai-month, Stromness, 1833 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 
Gavin Hamilton, Hoy and Graemsay, 1796 

James Anderson, Orphir, 1807 

Class Second. 
Thomas Blyth, Birsay and Harray, 1832 

A very keen and zealous partizan of the Evangelical cause, holding anti- 
patronage sentiments, and belonging to the extreme section. In the 
Assembly of 1838, he supported the independence resolutions ; and in 
that of 1841, he voted for the deposition of the Strathbogie recusants, the 
Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election of the eldership. He 
adhered to both series of the Convocation resohitioiis-. 

Charles Clouston, Sandwick, 1832 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and sjiiritual independence, and 
generally supported the Evangelical cause. He supported the veto act 
in presbytery, synod, and assembly; and in the Assembly of 1839, he 
voted for the very strong and solemn independence resolutions of that 
year. Soon afterwards, began to draw off from his former friends. 

Walter Weir, Walls and Flota, 1837 

Made a high profession of the principles of non-intrusion, and spiritual 
independence, and was an earnest and strenuous supporter of the Evan- 
gelical cause. In the Assembly of 1838, he voted for the indepen- 
dence resolutions ; and in that of 1841, for the deposition of the Strath- 
bogie recusants, for the Duke of Argyle's bill, and the popular election 
of the eldership. Soon afterwards, he began to draw off from his former 
party. 



ORKNEY. 105 

LXXX. — PRESBYTERY OF NORTH ISLES. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

George Ritchie, Rousay and Egilsliay, 1834 

Adam White, North Ronaldshay, 1837 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

Walter Traill, Lady, 1790 

WiUiam Grant, Cross and Burness, 1794 

John Simpson, Stronsay and Eday, 1805 

Class Second. 

John Barry, Shapinshay, 1805 

Professed the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and 
uniformly and earnestly supported the Evangelical side. It is believed 
that he would have joined the Free Church had he not unfortunately 
been, both before and since the disruption, incapacitated from taking 
any part in jjublic affairs. 

James Brotchie, Westray and Papa Westray, 1838 

A strenuous assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence. In the Assembly of 1842, he supported the anti-patronage 
resolutions and Claim of Rights ; and generally extended an unwavering 
support to all the measures of the Evangelical side. 

George Smellie, assistant and successor, Lady, 1839 

Made a full and earnest profession of Evangelical principles. In 1840, 
subscribed the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill ; and down to 
the very last he continued an unwavering support to the measures of 
the majority. It was generally understood that he had resolved to con- 
nect himself with the Free Church ; but, although at the time of the disrup- 
tion in Edinburgh, he did not formally do so. He was then, however, 
just on the eve of sailing for an appointment in Canada, and it is pos- 
sible that, in his peculiar circumstances, the omission may have been 
one merely of inadvertence. 

GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF ORKNEY. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Kirkwall, ministers seceding, . . 3 

„ Cairston, „ .... 2 

„ North Isles, „ .... 2 

Total of Free Church ministers (all endowed) in Synod, 7 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 
Presbytery of Kirkwall, ministers adhering, . 14 

„ Cairston, „ ..23 

North Isles, „ ..33 

Total of each Class (all endowed) in Synod, . 6 10 

6 

Together, .... 1& 



106 SHETLAND. 

SjjttotJ of Si)f tlanU. 

LXXXI. — PRESBYTERY OF LERWICK. 

1. FREE CHURCH. 

James Gardiner, QuarfF, P. 1830 

Alexander Stark, Sandwick, P. 1830 

John Elder, Walls, 1840 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT, 

Class First. 

John Bryden, Sandsting, 1813 

Thomas Barclay, Lerwick, 1822 

Zachary Macaulay Hamilton, Bressay, 1833 

Class Second. 

John Turnbull, Tingwall, 1806 

Maintained the pi-inciples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and throughout his long incumbency uniformly supported the Evangeli- 
cal cause. Latterly, like many others, inclined to anti-patronage views. 

John Charteris, Dunrossness, 1841 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and generally supported the Evangelical cause. 



LXXXII. — PRESBYTERY OF BURRAVOE. 

1. FREE CHURCH. - 

James Ingram, Unst, 1803 

John Ingram, assistant and successor, Unst, 1838 

2. RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class First. 

James "Watson, Fetlar, 1809 

John Paton, Delting, 1821 

John M'Gowan, Nesting, 1827 

Class Second. 
James Robertson, Yell, 1829 

A keen assertor of the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual inde- 
pendence. In the Assembly of 1832, supported the overtures on calls 
and the admission of the chapel ministers, and in that of 1835, voted 
for the veto and the chapel act. He uniformly supported the Evange- 
lical side in all their measures. 



SHETLAND. 107 

William Stevenson, Northmavine, 1830 

Like his co-presbyter, Mr Robertson, was a keen assertor of the principles 

of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, and uniformly supported the 

measures of the Evangelical side. In the Assembly of 1834 he recorded 

his vote for the veto. 



GENERAL RESULT OVER SYNOD OF SHETLAND. 

FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Lerwick, ministers seceding, . . .3 

„ Burravoe, „ ... 2 

Total of Free Church ministers (all endowed) in Synod, 5 

RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Class 1st. Class 2d. 
Presbytery of Lerwick, ministers adhering, . 3 2 

„ Burravoe, „ ..32 

Total of each Class (all endowed) in Synod, . 6 4 

6 

Together, ... - 10 



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110 MINISTERS OF CHAPELS OF EASE, &C. 



CLASSIFIED ROLL 

OF THE MINISTERS OF CHAPELS OF EASE IN CONNECTION WITH THE 
ESTABLISHMENT, OF ORDAINED ASSISTANT MINISTERS, AND OF MIS- 
SIONARIES OF THE SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF CHRISTIAN 
KNOWLEDGE, HAVING NO SEAT IN CHURCH COURTS. 

1. ADHERING TO FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Ahertarff. 
Charles Stewart, missionary of the Society for Propagating Christian 
Knowledge ; station, Fort-William, parish of Kilmalie. 

Presbytery of Arbroath. 
John Montgomery, assistant minister, Arbroath. 

Presbytery of Caithness. 
J. Sinclair, missionary of Christian Knowledge Society; station, Bruan, 
parish of Latheron. 

Presbytery of Dornoch. 
John Macdonald, Helmsdale Chapel, parish of Loth. 

Presbytery of Dundee. 
James Law, Mariners' Chaplain, Dundee. 

Presbytery of Dunoon. 
Alexander Macpherson, GaeHc Church, Roth say. 

Presbytery of Elgin. 
Robert Dunbar, Pluscarden Chapel, parish of Elgin. 

Presbytery of Fordoun. 
Alexander Grant, Cookney Chapel, parish of Fetteresso, 

Presbytery of Jedburgh. 
Robert Lang, Edgerston Chapel, parish of Jedburgh. 

Presbytery of KirTcaldy. 
Alexander Balfour, chapel at West Wemyss, parish of Wemyss. 

Presbytery of Pcnpont. 
Thomas Hastings, chapel at Wanlockhead, parish of Sanquhar. 

Presbytery of St Andrews. 
William King, chapel at Largoward, parish of Kilconquhar. 

Presbytery of Tongue. 
William M'Intyre, missionary of the Christian Knowledge Society ; 
station, Eribol and Melness, parish of Duirness. 



MINISTERS OF CHAPELS OF EASE, &C. Ill 

Presbytet-y of Weem. 
Donald Mackenzie, missionary of last mentioned society ; station, Ar- 

deonaig, parish of Killin. 
John Logan, missionary of said society ; station, Lawers, parish of 
Kenmore. 

Adhering to the Free Church in all, 15. 

2. ADHERING TO THE RESIDUARY ESTABLISMENT. 

Presbytery of Arbroath. 

Thomas Myles, chapel at Auchmithie, parish of St Vigeans. 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence;, 
and generally professed adherence to the Evangelical cause. 

Presbytery of Cairston. 
W. Macintosh, missionary of Christian Knowledge Society ; statioij, 
Flota, parish of Walls and Flota. 

Maintained the principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence, 
and professed adherence to the Evangelical cause. 

Presbytery of Dalkeith. 

John Fraser, chapel at Stobhill, parish of Newbattle. 

Professed general adherence to the Evangelical cause, and noaintained the 
principles of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. Subscribed the 
declaration adopted by the adhering probationers in December 1842, in 
which they declare, " that humbly beseeching Almighty God to strengthen 
them in the day of trial, they will maintain these principles in their own 
practice, and must in duty acknowledge and adhere to the ministers 
who maintain the same inviolate, as the office-bearers of that Church 
whose standards they have subscribed." Subsequently withdrew his 
adherence. 

Presbytery of Glasgow. 

Hugh M'Calman, Seamen^s Chaplain, Glasgow. 

A keen and vehement partizan of the Evangelical side, speaking frequently 
and violently at non-intrusion meetings. "Was a member of Convoca- 
tion, and adhered to both series of the resolutions. At the disruption 
joined the Free Church, adhered to the protest, preached repeatedly at 
various places in her service, and was on terms for a fixed station in her 
borders. The one week unhesitatingly and cheerfully subscribed the 
deed of demission, and the next sent a letter to the moderator of the 
Free Presbytery, requesting him to withdraw his name, and another to 
the Residuary Presbytery, entreating to be received back into the Esta-- 
blishment. Has since been pi-esented to the benefice of one of the 
seceding ministers. 

Presbytery of Jedburgh. 
Henry S. Riddel, chapel at Caerlanrig, pai'ish of Cavers. 

Presbytery of Inverary. 

Donald Jackson, chapel at Cumlodden, parish of Lochgilphead. 

Was for some time reckoned to belong to the Evangelical side. Last year 
was presented to the parliamentary church of Lochgilphead. His set- 



112 MISSIONARIES ON THE ROYAL BOUNTY. 

tlement was opposed on special objections, and the case came up to the 
Assembly of 1843, but in consequence of the disruption the objections 
were fallen from, and he has since been settled. 

Presbyter y of Lanark. 

John Hope, chapel at Leadhills, parish of Crawford. 

Presbytery of Linlithgoiv. 

Vacant ; chapel at Blackridge, parish of Torphichen. 

The former minister, Thomas Mowbray, having proceeded to Australia. 

Presbytery of Meigle. 

J. O. Greig, chapel at Blairgowrie. 

Professed adherence to the Evangelical cause, and maintained the prin- 
ciples of non-intrusion and spiritual independence. In 1840, subscribed 
the declaration against Lord Aberdeen's bill. Since the disruption has 

^ obtained the presentation to Blairgowrie, vacated for conscience sake by 

"* Mr Macdonald. 

William Mitchell, chapel at Persie, parish of Bendochy. 

Professed adherence to the Evangelical cause, and after the disruption 
declared his determination to join the Free Church, but did not act upon 
his resolution to that effect. 

Presbytery of Uist. 

N. Mackenzie, missionary of Christian Knowledge Society; station, St 
Kilda, South Uist. 

Presbytery of Wigton. 
Robert Somerville, chapel at Bargrennan, parish of MinnigafF. 
Was generally considered to belong to the Evangelical side, and to main- 
tain their principles. On one occasion he gave an honourable and prac- 
tical proof of his attachment to the i^rinciple of non-intrusion, for hav- 
ing obtained a presentation to be assistant and successor to the incum- 
bent of the parish of Kirkcowan, he was vetoed by the people, and 
submitted himself to the law of the Church. 

Adhering to the Residuary Establishment in all 10. 



CLASSIFIED ROLL. 

OF MISSIONARIES EMPLOYED BY THE COMMITTEE OF THE GENERAL 
ASSEMBLY FOR MANAGING THE ROYAL BOUNTY. 

1. ADHERING TO THE FREE CHURCH. 

Presbytery of Abertarff. 
William Lauder, Glengary, parish of Kilmonivaig. 

Presbytery of Caithness. 
Robert Rose Mackay, Achreny, &c., parish of Halkirk. 



MISSIONARIES ON THE ROYAL BOUNTY. 113 

Presbyteries of Dingwall and Inverness. 
Patrick Tulloch, Strathglass, parish of Kilmorack. 
Presbyteries of Dornoch and Tain. 
John D. Kennedy, Rosehall, parish of Creich. 

Presbytery of Elgin. 
D, Waters, Burghead, parish of DufFus. 

Presbytery of Fordyce. 
David Brown, Ord, parish of Duffus, &c. 

Presbytery of Kincardine O'Neil. 
J. M^Rae, Braemar, parishes of Crathie and Braemar, 
Donald Stewart, Glengairn, parish of Glenmuick. 

Presbytery of Lochcarron, 
George Corhett, Knoydart, parish of Glenelg. 

Presbytery of Lorn. 
J. E. Beith, the Glens, parish of Ardchattan. 

Adhering to the Free Church in all, 10. 

2. ADHERING TO THE RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

Presbytery of Aberlour. 
John M'Lean, Glenlivet, parish of Inveravon. 
William Mearns, Glenrinnes, parish of Invei-avon. 

Presbytery of Abernethy. 
John Clark, Grantown, parish of Cromdale. 

Made a profession of Evangelical principles, and was esteemed as belong- 
ing to the majority of the Church, until, nearly two years ago, he obtained 
a presentation to the parish of Daviot, and shewed a disposition to force 
his way into it against the inclinations of the great body of the parish- 
ionei's. Their opposition sisted his settlement until after the disruption, 
but it has, subsequently to that event, been got through. 

Presbytery of Abertarff. 
James Stewart, Fort Augustus, parish of Boleskine. 
Donald M'Intyre, at Lochaber, &c., parishes of Kilmalie, &c. 

Presbytery of Burravoe. 
G. M. Davidson, South Yell, parish of Fetlar. 

Presbytery of Forfar. 
William Ewart, Clova, &c., parish of Cortachy. 

Presbytery of Inverary. 
D. Macdonald, Lochfine, &c., parish of Inverary. 
Vacant — Mission of Tarbert, parish of South Knapdale. 
Presbytery of Kincardine O'Neil and Alford. 
William Forbes, Corgavff, parish of Strathdon, &c. 

H 



114 MLSSIOXAItlES ON THE ROYAL BOUNTY. 

Presbytery of Lerwick. 
William Paterson, Whiteness, parish of" Tingwall. 
Previous to the disruption; he professed Evangelical principles, and ap- 
proved of the Assembly's resolution against patronage. 
Presbytery of Mull. 
D. M'(J;illuni, Arisaig, parish of Ardnanuirchan. 
R. M'Kcnzie, Laga, parish of Ardnainurchan. 
Donald M'CoU, Morven, &c., parishes of Morven and Lisniore. 

Presbytery of North Isles. 
Robert Stobie, Eday, parish of Stronway, &c. 

Previous to the disruption, he professed Evangelical principles, and was 
always reckoned as belonging to the majority of the Church. 
Presbytery of Skye. 
Donald M'Donald, Minginish, parish of Bracadale. 
D. Maccallnni, Rasay and Rona, parish of Portree. 

Previous to the disruption professed Evangelical principles, and was al- 
ways reckoned as belonging to the majority of the Church. 
Presbytery of Tttrrif. 
A. Chapman, Milbrex, parish of Fyvie. 
Professed Evangelical principles ; and, in 1840, subscribed the declaration 
against Lord Aberdeen's bill. 

Presbytery of Uisi. 
D. M'Donald, Benbecula, parish of South Ui.st. 

Previous to the disruption he made a profession of Evangelical principles. 
A. Anderson, Cai'inish, parish of North Uist. 
Daniel M'Fie, Harris, parish of Harris. 

Maintained Evangelical principles ; and, shortly after tlie disrujition, 
made application to the Free Presbytery of Skye to be received as a 
minister of the Free Church, consideration of wliich was delayed till 
their next meeting. This application he has not faitiier prosecuted be- 
fore the Presbytery. 
Vacant. — Mission of Boisdale, parish of South Uist. 
Presbytery of Weem. 

M'Intosh, Amulrie, parish of Rannoch, &:c. 

John M'Laren, GrandtuUy, parish of Dull. 

Both these individuals, previous to the disruptio:i, made a profession of 
Evangelical principles. 

Adherhio- to the Residuary Fstablishmeiit in all, 22. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY^'S MISSIONARIES 

IN THE PRKSBYTERY OF STRATHBOGIE — PARISHES OF THE DEPO.SEU 

MINISTERS. 

1. ADHERING TO THE FREE (TIUReH. 

James Fergusson, Keith (now in London.) 
William Moffat, Cairnie. 



GENERAL ASSEMBLY'S MLSSIONARIES, &C. 115 

W. Taylor, Glass (now in Pultneytown, Wick.) 
T. Bain, Mortlach (now in Coupar Angus.) 
W. Sinclair, Huntly (now in Ellon.) 
W. Moncur, Botriphnie (now in Liff.) 
J. Wright, Rhynie (now in Swinton.) 

2. ADHERING TO THE RESIDUARY ESTABLISHMENT. 

None ! 



ROLL OF MISSIONARIES 

ON FOREIGN STATIONS, IN CONNECTION WITH THE CHURCH OF SCOTLAND. 

1. MISSION IN INDIA. 

ADHERING TO THE FREE CHURCH. 

Calcutta— Alexander Duff, D.D., William Sinclair Mackay, David 

Ewart, John M'Donald, Thomas Smith. 
Madras — John Anderson, Robert Johnstone, John Braidwood.* 
Bombay— John Wilson, D.D., Rol)ert Nisbet, J. M. Mitchell, A.M. 
PooNAH — James Mitchell, 

Ghospara — Mahendra Lai Basack and Khorlas, native catcchists. 
In all, U. 

adhering to the rtsiduary establishment. 

None ! ! 

2. mission to the jews, 
adhering to the free church. 

Pesth — John Duncan, D.D., Robert Smith, Alexander S. T. Saphir 

Frederick Tm. Newhaus. 
Jassy — Daniel Edward, Herman Phillip. . 
Constantinople — C. Schwai-tz. 
Syria — William Owen Allan. 

adhering to residuary establishment. 

None ! ! ! 

N.B. — It may be mentioned that the African Missionaries employed by 
the Glasgow Missionary Society have all likewise adhered to the Free 
Church. Not a single Missionary, on any Foreign station, owns the Residuary 
Establishment, or retains connection with it. 



" It is right to state that no positive adherence has yet been received from the Missionaries 
at Madras. It seems probable that it was forwarded with the mail for last month, and lost 
with it. No doubt on the subject, however, appears to be entertained. 



llii 



ROLL OF PROBATlONliRS. 



ROLL OF PROBATIONERS ADIILRINC4 TO THE FREE CHURCH. 



David Adams, Dundee 
John Adam, Larbert, Falkirk 
Hugh Aird, Selkirk, 
John Allan, Rothes 
Frederick F. Anderson, Greenock 
Harry Anderson, Markinch, Fife 
John Anderson, Greenock 
William Andson, Arbroath 
David Arthur, Kilmarnock 
James Bain, Helensburgh, Dunbartom 
J. H. Ballingal, Markinch, Fife 
Charles W. Barclay, Calcots, Elgin 
"William Bethune, Kennoway, Fife. 
Robert Bremner, Erskine, Paisley 
James B. Brichan, Forres 
George Brown, Dundee 
John F. Brown, Edinburgh 
John Bryden, St Quivox, Ayr 
John Burn, Madeira 
Isla Burns, Edinburgh 
W. C. Burns, Kilsyth 
Thomas Burnside, Girvan, Ayrshire 
D. Cami)bell, Cluny, Aberdeen 
Murdoch Campbell, Poolewe, Ding- 
wall 
Thomas Christie, Glasgow 

Charles Clarke, Kinnell, Dingwall 
D. Clarke, Kintyre 

Donald R. Clarke, Kilmun, Dunoon 
Duncan Clarke, Killean, Tarbert 
Alexander Cleghorn, Broughty Feny, 
Dundee 

Alexander Cobban, Inverallochy, Fra- 
serburgh 

George Cowans, Dumfries 

James Cullen, Edinburgh 

James Cumming, Edinburgh 

Andrew Cunningham 

Robt. Cunningham, Polmont, Falkirk 

Archibald Currie, Glasgow 

George Dalziel, Edinburgh 

James Dickson, Maryton, Montrose 

W. S. Donald, Strathmiglo, Ivinross 

William Douglass, Perth 

Archibald Duncan, Kirkwall, Orkney 

George Duncan, Sprouston, Kelso 

Peter Edgar, Linlithgow 

Wm. Elmslie, Honeybank, Aberdeen 

Henry Fairbairn, Greenock 

John Fairbairn, Edinburgh 

Alexander Fairweather, Dundee 

John Ferguson, New Kilpatrick, Glas- 
gow 

Eric J. Findlater, Ardentinny, Cowal 

Colin Frazer, Gairloch, Dingwall 



David Eraser, Contin, do. 

John Eraser, Erchless, Beauly 

Dr James Gardiner, Edinburgh 

John Garson, Sandwich, Orkney 

Alexander Gatherer, Dundee 

Robert Gibson 

Charles Glass, Carronshore, Falkirk 

Andrew Glen, Irvine 

Adam Gordon, Portsoy 

William Graham, Comrie, Crieft' 

James Grant, Aberdeen 

Peter Grant, Lochbroom, Dingwall 

Thomas Gray, Aberdeen 

James Greig, Craig, Montrose 

Thomas Halley, Edinburgh 

William H. Hewitson,Dalmellington, 
Ayrshire 

Alexander Hislop, Glasgow 

George Hislop, Edinburgh 

Peter Hope, 22 India Street, Edin- 
burgh 

William Ingram, Gartly, Stratlibogie 

Gilbert Johnstone, Glasgow 

Joseph G. King, Stewarton 

Robert Kingan, Scalloway, Lerwick 

Henry ISL Laird, Prinlaws, Fife 

Robert Lang, Jedburgh 

George Lawson, Drumblade, Huntly 

William Leishnian, Edinburgh 

Robert Lindsay, Blackridge, Batligale 

Neil Livingston, Glasgow 

James Logan, Glasgow 

William Lyall, Edinburgh 

William INI'Ara, Perth 

Alex. G. "Macgilivray, Lairg, Suther- 
landshire 

John Macpherson, Laggan 

Donald Macrae, Carloway, Stornowny 

James M'^Aulay, Nottingham 

Robert M'Combie, Aberdeen 

James M'Conaclw, Rothsay 

Jolin M'Cosh, Abernyte, Carse of 
Gowric 

A. L. M'Cririe, Cairnryan, Stranraer 

James M'Donald, Fortrose 

John M'Donald, Dunoon 

John M'Donald, Aberdeen 

John M'Donald, Dunnet, Thurso 

John M'Donald, Helmsdale, Golspie 

Archibald M'Dougall, Glasgow 

John IMacdougall, Edinburgh 

Jolin M'Farlan, Greenock 

Archibald M'Gilivray, Ceres, Fife 

Mui'do M'Intvre, Lochbroom, Ding- 
wall 



ROLL OF PROBATIONERS. 



ii: 



Alexander M'Intyre, Strontian, Ap- 
pin 

John M'Kail, Glasgow 

David N, M'Kay, Drainie, Elgin 

John M'Kay, Cl3'iie, Golspie 

Colin M'Kenziej Munlochy, Ross-shire 

John C. M'Kenzie, Tain 

William M'Kenzie 

Duncan M'Laine, Blantyre 

George M'Lean, Culsalnioiid 

Henry M'Leod, Kincardine, Ross-shire 

John M'Millan, Port of Menteith, 
Doune 

John M'Nab, CuUoden, Inverness 

Cosmo M'Pherson, Tomintoiil, Aber- 
nethy 

John M^^Tavish, Brodick, Arraii 

Wra. Makellar, Pencaitland, Tranent 

John ilatheson, Kilmuir, Ross-shire 

William Meston, Aberdeen 

John Millar, Edinburgh 

Nicholson Milne, Lochlee, Forfarshire 

David jMitchell, BlairdaiF, Garioch 

David Mitchell, Wick 

Robert Moir, Edinburgh 

John Morgan, Colgrain, Dumbarton 

James Morison Kiltearn, Dingwall 

John ]Morison, Elie, Fife 

Patrick Muirhead, Craromond, Edin- 
burgh 

Alexander Munro, Halkirk, Thui-so 

Donald Munro, Dowally, Dunkeld 

David M. Murray, Creich, Bonar Bridge 

Nicoll, Coll, Tobermory 

Harry Nicol, Auchindoir, Rhynie 

George Ogilvie, Dundee 

John Paterson, North Leith 

Alexander Paton, Perth 

Joseph Patrick, Bridge of Earn, Perth 

Andrew Peebles, Dunfermline 

George Philip, Aberdeen 

William Pollock, Glasgow 
James Porteous, Maybole 

Eneas M. Rate, Edinburgh 

Alexander Reid, Edinburgh 

Edward Reid, Aberdeen 

Samuel R. Reid, Greenock 

Alexander Rhind, Forres 

A. W. Riddocli, Shapinshay, Orkney 



Andrew Robertson, Greenock 

John Robertson, Edinbiigh 

Wm. Robertson, Rathven, Banfl'shire 

S. Robertson, Madeira 

Donaldson Rose, Aberdeen 

Robert Ross, Glasgow 

William Ross, Fodderty, Dingwall 

Alex. F. Russel, Gairloch, Dingwall 

George B. Scott, Culross 

James Scott, Edinburgh 

William Scott, Carmylie, Arbroath 

William Scott, Melrose 

Charles Scott, Edinburgh 

William Scott, Glasgow 

Dugald Shaw, Muckairn, Lome 

Alexander Shepherd, New Deer 

James Simpson, Firth, Orkney 

Hugh Skinner, Helmsdale, Golspie 

James G. Small, Edinburgh 

David Smith, Glasgow 

James Smith, Glasgow 

Alex. Spencer, Fordoun, Auchinblae 

Alexander Steel, Burghead, Elgin 

Peter Steele, Dalkeith 

Alexander Steele, Johnstone, Paisley 

W. C. Stephen, Culross 

George Stevenson, Alloa 

Athole Stewart, Blair Athole 

Murdoch Stewart, Calcots, Elgin 

Robert Stirrat, Dairy, Irvine 

John Storie 

Robt. Sutherland, Dunbeath, Caithness 

Alan Thomson, Greenock 

Adam Thorburn, Edinburgh 

John Tindal, Lanark 

Robert Trail, Panbride, Fife 

JohnTweedie, Stockbridge, Edinburgh 

Alex. Urquhart, Cross and Burness, 

Orkney 
P. Hately Waddell, 115 Graeme St., 

Glasgow 
John Walker, Stranraer 
Alexander Wallace, Edinburgh 
Thomas Waters, Moffat 
Hiram Watson, Logie Almond, Perth 
James Watson, Edinburgh 
William Whyte, Edinburgh 
George Wilson, Alves, Elgin 



119 



APPENDIX 



No. I. 

BECLARATION AGAINST LORD ABERDEEN'S BILL, 

CHUfiCH OF SCOTLAND. — NON-IKTEUSION DECLAKATION. 

The subjoined declaration was set on foot before Lord Aberdeen's bill appeared, and 
in anticipation that while it would fall short of either of the two measures ap- 
proved of by the Committee, it would come up to what has been termed the 
Presbyterial Veto. The bill proving so very far below wliat was expected as 
to call forth universal opposition, it was not deemed necessary, after it had 
been transmitted by printed circulai'S for a few weeks, to proceed with this 
declaration, which was allowed to be dropt without having been completed. It 
is published now, though in this unfinished state, in consequence of the publi- 
cation of a recent declaration in favour of Lord Aberdeen's bill, signed by 1060 
ministers and elders. It may be mentioned that the ministers who were mem- 
bers of the General Assembly's Non-intrusion Committee thought it uniiecos- 
sary on their part to subscribe this declaration. 

Mhnite by the General Asseinblii's Nonintrusion Committee, April 13. 1840. 
Tlie Committee having ascertained that the Government do not intend at present 
to introduce a measure on the subject, deem it proper to make known the views 
W'hich the Committee have endeavoured to press upon members of the Legislature, 
and the specific measures, one or other of which they were desirous to have had pro- 
posed for adopiion by the Legislature. These are hereto subjoined :— No. 1 being 
the copy of the draft of a proposed bill communicated to the Lord Advocate by the 
Committee prior to the meeting of Parliament, of which a recognition of the existing 
law of the Church forms the basis; and No. 2 exhibiting a measure, founded on the 
Call, which formed the subject of discussion at a subsequent period ; and which also, 
for the sake of distinctness, has since been thrown into the form of a draft of a pro- 
posed bill. \t is to be kept in view that these are merely rough sketches, showing 
the general plan of the proposed measure, but possibly not in the precise shape in 
which they would have to be presented to Parliament. 
No. 1. 
Whereas great evils are likely to arise in that part of the United Kingdom called 
Scotland, from the state of the law in regard to the presentation to cliurches, if not 
prevented by an alteration thereof by authority' of Parliament,— be it therefore en- 
acted, &c., that in all cases in which the presentee to anj' church or parish in that 
part of Great Britian called Scotland shall have been rejected by sentence of the 
Presbytery of the bounds, or of the competent superior Church judicatory reviewing 
the proceedings of such Presbytery, in respect of the dissent of the major part of the 
male heads of families in communion with the Church, members of the congregation 
of the church or parish presented to, such dissent in the judgment of the Presbytery, 
or competent superior Church judicatory, not proceeding from factious or malicious 
motives, but from aconscientious regard to the spiritual interests of the congregation, 
—all right and interest on the part of tlie presentee in the presentation granted to 
him shall cease and determine, in the same manner and to the same eifect as such 



120 APPENDIX. 

right and interest on the part of a presentee rejected as not qualified according io 
law, ceases and determines. 

Provided always, and be it enacted and declared, that it is and shall be competent 
to and incumbent on the patron, presentee, or heads of families, calling the presentee, 
who may allege that such dissents, as aforesaid, proceed from factious or malicious 
motives, and not from a conscientious regard to the interests of the congregation, to 
establish the same to the satisfaction of the Presbytery or superior Church judicatory, 
by evidence competent accoi'ding to the law of the Church in the judgment of the 
said judicatories. 

No. 2. 

Whei'eas it is expedient that the subsisting law in regard to the presentation to 
benefices in that part of Great Britain called Scotland should be altered, and certain 
doubts relating to the same removed, be it therefore enacted, &c. 

That if, at the meeting appointed for moderating in a call to the presentee to any 
church or parish in Scotland, the call to the said presentee shall not be subscribed by 
a majority of the male communicants, members of the congregation standing on the 
roll of communicants kept agreeably to the regulations prescribed, or to be prescribed 
by the laws of the Church, who shall assemble in congregation on the occasion of 
Buch meeting; and if. in like manner, at an adjourned meeting for moderating in the 
call to be held in all cases in which such concurrence shall not have been so obtained, 
not sooner than seven, nor later than fourteen days thereafter, the said call shall not 
be subscribed by a majority of the said members qualified as aforesaid, who shall as- 
semble in congregation at such adjourned meeting, the presentation to such presentee 
shall, ipso facto, become void and null to all intents and purposes, and it shall not be 
competent for the patron again to present the same presentee on the occasion of the 
then subsisting vacancy in the church or parish presented to. 

And be it further enacted and declared, that all questions in regard to the parties 
entitled to be placed on the roll herein before mentioned, and to be constituent mem- 
bers of the congregation at the meetings for moderating in the call to a presentee, 
and in regard to the qualifications of the presentee for the office of the holy ministry, 
or his fitness for the pastoral charge of the particular church or parish to which he 
may have been presented, are and shall be under the exclusive control of the judica- 
tories of the Church, and of no other courts or judicatories whatsoever. 

We, the undersigned ministers and elders, having considered the minute of the 
General Assembly's Committee, of date 13th April 1840, deem it our duty to ex- 
press our most cordial concurrence in the principles on which the Committee 
have endeavoured to obtain a settlement of the question of Non-intrusion. And 
we beg leave further very earnestly to express our desire and hope, that any bill 
to be introduced on this subject may be substantially in accordance with one or 
other of the draft bills contained in the said minute; it being our persuasion, 
that nothing short of a full recognition of the principles which they embody will 
bring about peace and harmony, by effecting, not a temporary and precarious, 
but a real and permanent, adjustment. 



No. II. 

SOLEMN ENGAGEMENT IN DEFENCE OF THE LIBERTIES OF THE 
CHURCH AND PEOPLE OF .SCOTLAND. 

Whereas it is the bounden duty of those who are entrusted by the Lord Jesus with 
the ruling of his House, to have a supreme regard in all their actings to the glory of 
God the Father, the authority of his beloved Son, the only King in Zion, and the 
spiritual liberty and prosperity of the Church, which He hath purchased with His 
own blood : 



APPENDIX. 121 

Whereas, also, it is their right and privilege, and is especially incumbent upon 
them, in trying times, as well for their own mutual encouragement and support, as 
for the greater assurance of the Church at large, to unite and bind themselves to- 
gether, by a public profession of their principles, and a solemn pledge of adherence 
to the same, as in like circumstances our ancestors were wont to do : 

And whereas God, in his Providence, has been pleased to bring the Church of Scot- 
land into a position of great difficulty and danger, in which, by acting according to 
the dictates of conscience, and of the Word of God, imminent hazard of most serious 
evils, personal as well as public, is incurred :— 

In these circumstances, it being above all things desirable that, in the face of all 
contrary declarations and representations, our determination to stand by one another, 
and by our principles, should be publicly avowed, and, by the most solemn sanctions 
and securities, before God and the country, confirmed and sealed ; — 

We, the undersigned Ministers and Eldeks, humbling ourselves under the mighty 
hand of our God, acknowledging His righteousness in all His ways, confessing our 
iniquities, and the iniquities of our fathers, mourning over the defections and short- 
comings which have most justlj' provoked His holy displeasure against this Church ; 
adoring at the same time his long suffering patience and tender mercy, and giving 
thanks for the undeserved grace and loving-kindness with which He has visited His 
people and revived His cause ;— under a deep sense of our own insufficiency, and 
relying on the countenance and blessing of the Great God and our Saviour ; — do de- 
liberately publish and declare our purpose and resolution to maintain in all our act- 
ings, and at all hazards to defend, those fundamental principles relative to the govern- 
ment of Christ's House, His Church on earth, for which the Church of Scotland is 
now called to contend ;— principles which we conscientiously believe to be founded 
on the Word of God, recognised by the standards of that Church, essential to her in- 
tegrity as a Church of Christ, and inherent in her constitution as the Established 
Church of this land. 

The principles now referred to, as they have been repeatedly declared by this 
Church, are the two following, viz. — I. " That the Lord Jesus, as King and Head of 
His Church, hath therein appointed a government in the hand of Church officers, dis- 
tinct from the civil magistrate." II. " That no minister shall be intruded into any 
parish contrary to the will of the congregation." 

To these principles we declare our unalterable adherence : and, applying them to 
the present position, and the present duty of the Church, we think it right to state 
still more explicitly what we conceive to be implied in them. 

1. We regard the doctrine—" that the Lord Jesus is the only King and Head of His 
Church, and that he hath therein appointed a government in the hand of Church 
officers distinct from the civil magistrate," — this sacred and glorious doctrine we re- 
gard as fencing in the Church of God against all encroachments and invasions incon- 
sistent with the free exercise of all the spiritual functions which the Lord Jesus has 
devolved either upon its rulers or upon its ordinary members. While, therefore, we 
abhor and renounce the Popish doctrine, that the government appointed by the Lord 
Jesus in His Church hath jurisdiction over the civil magistrate, in the exercise of his 
functions, or excludes his jurisdiction in any civil matter, we strenuously assert that 
it is independent of the civil magistrate, and that it has a jurisdiction of its own in 
all ecclesiastical matters, with which the civil magistrate may not lawfully interfere, 
either to prevent or to obstruct its exercise. 

2. In particular, we maintain, that all questions relating to the examination and 
admission of ministers, or to the exercise of discipline, and the infliction or removal 
of ecclesiastical censures, lie within the province of the Church's spiritual jurisdic- 
tion : and all such questions must be decided by the Church officers, in whose hands 
the government is appointed, according to the mind and will of Christ, revealed in 
His Word, not according to the opinions or decisions of any secular authority what- 
soever. We are very far, indeed, from insisting that the judgments of the competent 



122 APPENDIX. 

Church officers, in such questions, can of themselves carr^' civil consequences, or ne- 
cessarily rule the determination of any civil points that may arise out of them. In 
regard to these, as in regard to all temporal matters, we fully acknowledge the civil 
magistrate to be the sole and supreme judge,— bound, indeed, to have respect to the 
Word of God and the liberties of Christ's Church, yet always entitled to act inde- 
pendently, on his own convictions of what is right. But, in regard to all spiritual 
consequences, and especiallj' in regard to the spiritual standing of members of the 
Church, and their spiritual privileges and obligations, the judgments of the Church 
officers are the only judgments wliich can be recognised by us as competent and autho- 
ritative. And if at any time the civil magistrate pronounce judgments by which it 
is attempted to control or supersede or impede the sentences of the Church officers, in 
these spiritual matters, and in their spiritual relations and effects, we must feel our- 
selves compelled to act upon our own conscientious interpretation of the will of 
Christ, — disregarding these judgments as invalid, and protesting against them as 
oppressive. 

3. As the Lord Jesus has appointed a government in His Church in the hand of 
Church officers, so we believe at the same time that He has invested the ordi- 
nary members of His Church with important spiritual privileges, and has called 
them to exercise, on their own responsibility, important spiritual functions. In 
particular, we are persuaded that their consent, either formally given, or inferred 
from the absence of dissent, ought to be regarded by the Church officers as an indis- 
pensable condition in forming the pastoral relation ; and that the act of a congrega- 
tion, agreeing either expresslj^ or tacitly, or declining to receive anj' pastor proposed 
to them, ought to be free and voluntary, proceeding upon their own conscientious 
convictions, and not to be set aside by the Church officers,— the latter, however, 
always retaining inviolate their constitutional powers of government and superin- 
tendence over the people. We hold it, accordingly, to be contrary to the very nature 
of the pastoral relation, and the end of the pastoral office,— altogether inconsistent 
with the usefulness of the Church, and hostile to thesuccessof the Gospel ministry,— 
an act of oppression on the part of whatever authority enforces it, and a cause of 
grievous and just offence to the people of God, — that a minister should be settled in 
any congregation in opposition to the solemn dissent of the communicants. We 
deliberately pledge ourselves, therefore, to one another, and to the Church, that we 
will, by the help of God, continue to defend the people against the intrusion of un- 
acceptable ministers, and that we will consent to no plan for adjusting the present 
difficulties of the Church, which does not afford the means of effectually securing to 
the members of every congregation a decisive voice in the forming of the pastoral tie. 

4. And, farther, with reference to the question respecting Civil Establishments of 
religion, which we believe to be deeply and vitally concerned in the present contend- 
ings of the Church, we feel ourselves called upon to bear this testimony : — that, hold- 
ing sacred the principle of Establishments, as sanctioned both by reason and bj' the 
Word of God,— I'ecognising the obligation of civil rulers to support and endow the 
Church, and the lawfulness and expediency of the Church receiving countenance and 
assistance from the State,— we at the same time bold no less strongly, that the prin- 
ciples which we have laid down regarding the government of Christ's Church, and 
the standing of his people, cannot be surrendered or compromised for the sake of any 
temporal advantages, or any secular arrangements whatsoever ; that it is both un- 
wise and unrighteous in the civil magistrate to impose upon the Church any condi- 
tion incompatible with these principles ; and that no consideration of policy, and no 
alleged prospect of increased means of usefulness, can justify the Church in acceding 
to such a condition. We emphatically protest against the doctrine, that, in establish- 
ing the Church, the civil magistrate is entitled to impose any restrictions on the 
authority of her office-bearers or the liberties of her members. On the contrary, we 
strenuously assert, that it is his sacred duty, as it is his interest, to give positive en- 
couragement and support to the Church in the exercise of all her spiritual functions, 



APPENDIX. 123 

—for thus only can God. from whom he receives his power, be fully glorified, or the 
prosperity and greatness of any people be effectually promoted. We admit, indeed, 
that, as supreme in all civil matters, the civil magistrate has always command over 
the temporalities bestowed upon the Church, and has power to withdraw them. But 
he does so under a serious responsibility. And, at all events, the Church, whilst pro- 
testing against the wrong, must be prepared to submit to their being withdrawn, 
rather than allow him to encroach upon that province which the Lord Jesus has 
raaiked out as sacred from his interference. 

5. While we consider the Church's course of duty to be plain, if such an emergency 
as we have supposed should arise, we have hitherto believed, and, notwithstanding 
the recent adverse decisions of the Civil Courts, we still believe, that the constitution 
of the Established Church of Scotland, as ratified by the State at the eras of the Re- 
volution and the Union, when, after many long struggles, her liberty was finally 
achieved, effectually secured that Church against this grievous evil. The only quarter 
from whence danger to her freedom ever could, since these eras, be reasonably appre- 
hended, is the system of Patronage ; against which, when it was restored in 1711, the 
Church strenuously protested, and of which— as we have much satisfaction, especially 
after recent events, in reflecting — she has never approved. The restoration of that 
system we hold to have been a breach of the Revolution Settlement and the Treaty 
of Union, contrary to the faith of nations. Even under it, indeed, we liave main- 
tained, and will contend to the uttermost, that the constitution of the Church and 
Country gives no warrant for the recent encroachments of the Civil Courts upon the 
ecclesiastical province ; that, in terms of that constitution, the Church has still wholly 
in her hands the power of examination and admission, and, in the exercise of that 
power, is free to attach what weight she judges proper lo any element whatever that 
she feels it to be necessary to take into account as affecting the fitness of the presentee, 
or the expediency of his settlement ; and that, unquestionablj', in whatever way the 
Church may deal with the question of admission, the Civil Courts have no right to 
interfere, except as to the disposal of the temporalities. But while we have taken 
this ground, and will continue to maintain it to be lawful, constitutional, and im- 
pregnable, even under the restored system of Patronage, we avow our opposition to 
the system itself, as a root of evil in the Church which ought to be removed,— the 
cause, in former times, of wide-spread sjjiritual desolation in the land, as well as of 
more than one secession of many godly men from the Church,- and the source, in 
these our own days, of our present dilhculties and embari-assments. We look upon 
the recent decisions of the Civil Courts as illustrating the real character of that system 
of Patronage which they attempt so rigidly to enforce ; — making it clear, that it does 
impose a burden upon the Church and people of Scotland greatly more grievous than 
it was ever before believed to do. We consider it to be impossible for the Church, 
60 long as this matter continues on its present footing, fully to vindicate, or efiectually 
to apply her inherent and fundamental principles ; and it is now more than ever our 
firm persuasion, that the Church ought to be wholly delivered from the interference 
of any secular or worldly right at all, with her deliberations relative to the settlement 
of ministers. We declare, therefore, our determination to seek the removal of this 
yoke, which neither we nor our fathers have been able to bear ; believing that it was 
imposed in violation of a sacred national engagement, and that its removal will, more 
effectually than any other measure, clear the way for a satisfactory and permanent 
adjustment of all the questions and controversies in which we are now involved. 

Having thus set forth the principles on which we are united, — being deeply im- 
pressed with a sense of their sacredness and magnitude, — having our minds filled with 
solemn awe as we contemplate the crisis to which God, in his holy Providence, has 
brought this Church aud kingdom,— a crisis of immediate urgency and of momentous 
issues, in which great principles must be tested, and interests of vast extent may be 
aflected,— and desiring to deliberate and act with a single eye to the divine glory, 
and a simple regard to the divine will— 



124 APPENDIX. 

We, the undersigned Mixisteks and Eldeks, do solemnly, as in a lioly covenant 
with God and with one another, engage to stand by one another, and by the Church 
which God's own right hand has planted among us, — promising and declaring, that, 
by the grace and help of Almighty God, we will adhere to the two great principles 
which we have avowed, and, in all our actings as office-bearers in the Church, will do 
our utmost, at all hazards, to carry them into effect ; and that we will consent to no 
surrender or compromise of the same, but will faithfully and zealously prosecute our 
endeavours to obtain a settlement of the present question in entire accordance there- 
with. 

And considering, that, in this struggle in which the Church is engaged, it is most 
necessary that we should be assured of the concurrence and co-operation of the 
Christian people, on whose sympathyand prayers we, in the discharge of our functions 
as rulers, greatly lean, and by whose influence and assistance we can best hope effec- 
tually to press upon the governors of this great nation the just claims of the Church — 

We do, most earnestly and affectionately, invite our friends and brethren, members 
of the Church of our fathers, to come to our help, and to the help of the Lord, — to 
declare their concurrence in the great principles for which we are called to contend, 
and their determination to do all in their power, in their station, and according to 
their means and opportunities, to aid us in maintaining and defending these prin- 
ciples ; so that they, as well as we, shall consider themselves pledged to uphold the 
Church in her present struggle, and, in particular, to use the powers and privileges 
which, as the citizens of a free country, they have received from God, and for the exer- 
cise of which they are responsible to Him, for this above all other ends, that the deter- 
mination of the legislature of this great nation, whenever this subject shall come 
before them, may be in accordance witli those principles which all of us hold to be 
essential to the purity of the Church and the prosperity of the people. 

We in an especial manner invite them to raise a united and solemn protest against 
the system of Patronage, which, unjust and obnoxious as it was in its first enactment, 
the decisions of the Civil Courts are now rivetting more firmly than ever on the re- 
claiming Church of their fathers. The entire removal of that system they have the 
fullest warrant, as Scotsmen and as Presbyterians, to claim, on the ground of their 
ancient constitution, and the solemn guarantees by which their national freedom and 
their religious faith have been secured. 

And, finally, recognising the hand of God in our present troubles, depending wholly 
on His interposition for a happy issue out of them, and remembering what our fathers 
have told us,— what work the Lord did in their days and in the times of old, we call 
upon the Christian people to unite with us in a solem'n engagement to bear the case 
of our beloved Church upon our hearts, in prayer and supplication at the throne of 
God, beseeching Him to turn the hearts of those who are against us, and to guide us 
in the right way,— so that, under His overruling Providence, and by the operation of 
His Almighty Spirit, the cause of truth and righteousness may be advanced, and the 
work of righteousness may be peace, and the eftect of righteousness, quietness, and 
assurance for ever. 



No. III. 

EXTRACT FROM THE CLAIM OF RIGHTS, DECLARATION AND PROTEST, 

ADOPTED BY THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1812. 

[The first portion of the Claim of Rights is occupied with an exhibition of the legal 

and constitutional warrants for the Church's principles and procedure, and of the 

encroachments of the Civil Courts. After this is completed, it then proceeds as 

follows.] 

And whereas the government and discipline of Christ's church cannot be carried 

on according to his laws and the constitution of his church, as held by the Chureh of 



APPEXDIX. 125 

Scotland, and ratified by the laws of the land, subject to tlie exercise, by any secular 
tribunal, of such powers as have been assumed by the said Court of Session. 

And whereas this church, highlj' valuing, as she has done, her connection, on the 
terras contained in the statutes hereinbefore recited, with tlie State, and her posses- 
sion of the temporal benefits thereby secured to her for the advantage of the people, 
must nevetheless, even at the risk and hazard of the loss of that connection and of 
these temporal benefits— deeply as she w ould deplore and deprecate such a result for 
herself and the communitj^— persevere in maintainingher liberties asachurch of Christ, 
and in carrying on the government thereof on her own constitutional principles, and 
must refuse to intrude ministers on their congregations, to obey the unlawful coercion 
attempted to be enforced against her in the exercise of her spiritual functions and 
jurisdiction, or to consent that her people be deprived of their rightful liberties. 

Therefore, the General Assembly, while, as above set forth, they fully recognise 
the absolute jurisdiction of the civil courts in relation to all matters whatsoever of a 
civil nature, and especially in relation to all the temporalities conferred by the State 
upon the church, and the civil consequences attached by law to the decisions in mat- 
ters spiritual, of the church courts— do, in name and on behalf of this church, and of 
the nation and people of Scotland, and under the sanction of the several statutes, 
and the Treaty of Union hereinbefore recited, claim, as a right, that she shall freely 
possess and enjoy her liberties, government, discipline, rights, and privileges, accord- 
ing to law, especially for the defence of the spiritual liberties of her people, and that 
she shall be protected herein from the foresaid unconstitutional and illegal encroach- 
ments of the said Court of Session, and her people secured in their Christian and 
constitutional rights and libei-ties. 

And they declare, that they cannot, in accordance with the word of God, the 
authorized and ratified standards of this Church, and the dictates of their consciences, 
intrude ministers on reclaiming congregations, or carry on the government of Christ's 
church, subject to the coercion attempted by the Court of Session as above set'forth ; 
and that, at the risk and hazard of suffering the loss of the temporal benefits confer- 
red by the State, and the advantages of an establishment, they must, as by God's grace 
they will, refuse so to do ; for, highly as they estimate these, they cannot put them 
in competition with the inalienable liberties of a church of Christ, which, alike by 
their duty and allegiance to their Head and King, and by their ordination vows, they 
are bound to maintain, " notwithstanding of whatsoever trouble or persecution may 
arise." 

And they protest, that all and whatsoever sentences of courts and acts of the 
Parliament of Great Britain, in contravention of the aforesaid government, discipline, 
riglits, and privileges of this church, secured by the Treat}' of Union, as an unalterable 
and fundamental condition thereof, are and shall be in themselves, void and null, and 
of no legal force or effect, as beyond the powers of the parties from whom they pro- 
ceed, and in violation of the said treaty; and that, while they will accord full sub- 
mission to all such acts and sentences, in so far— though in so far only — as those 
may regard civil rights andprivileges,whatever may be their opinion of the justice or 
legality of the same, their said submission shall not be deemed an acquiescence there- 
in, but that it shall be free to the members of this church, or their successors, at any 
time hereafter when there shall be a prospect of obtaining justice, to claim the resti- 
tution of all such civil rights and privileges, and temporal benefits and endowments, 
as for the present they may be compelled to yield up, in order to preserve to their 
office-bearers the free exercise of their spiritual government and discipline, and to 
the people the liberties, of which respectively it has been attempted so contrary to 
law and justice to deprive them. 

And, finally, the General Assembly call the Christian people of this kingdom, 
and all the churches of the Reformation throughout the world, who hold the great doc- 
trine of the sole Headship of the Lord Jesus over his church, to witness, that it is for 
their adherence to that doctrine, asset forth in their Confession of Faith, and ratified 



126 APPENDIX. 

by the laws of this kingdom, and the maintenance by them of the jurisdiction of the 
office-bearers, and the freedom and privileges of the members of the church from that 
doctrine flowing, that this church is subjected to hardship, and that the rights so sa- 
credly pledged and secured to her are put in peril ; and they especially invite all the 
office-bearers and membei-s of this church, who are willing to suffer for their 
allegiance to their adorable King and Head, to stand by the church and by each other, 
in defence of the doctrine aforesaid, and of the liberties and privileges, whether of 
office-bearers or people, which rest upon it ; and to unite in supplication to Almighty 
God, that he would be pleased to turn the hearts of the rulers of this kingdom, to 
keep unbroken the faith pledged to this church, in former days, by statutes and so- 
lemn treaty, and the obligations come under to God himself, to preserve and maintain 
the government and discipline of this church in accordance with his word ; or other- 
wise, that he would give strength to this church— office-bearers and people — to en- 
dure resignedly the loss of the temporal benefits of an establishment, and the personal 
sufferings and sacrifices to which they may be called, and would also inspire them 
with zeal and energy to promote the advancement of his Son's kingdom, in whatever 
condition it maybe his will to place them ; and that, in his own good time, he would 
restore to them these benefits, the fruits of the struggles and sufferings of their 
fathers in times past in the same cause; and, thereafter, give them grace to employ 
them more effectually than hitherto they have done for the manifestation of his glorj'. 

No. IV. 
MEASURE OF NOX-IXTRUSIOX INTRODUCED INTO THE HOUSE OF LORDS BY 

HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF ARGYLE, 
AND APPROVED OF BY THE GP.NERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1841 BY AN OVERWHELMING MAJORITY. 

AN ACT TO REGULATE THE EXERCISE OF CHURCH PATRONAGE IN SCOTLAND. 

Whereas by an Act passed in the 10th year of the reign of her late Majesty Queen 
Anne, intituled " An Act to restore the patrons to their ancient rights of presenting 
Ministers to the Churches vacant in that part of Great Britain called Scotland," the 
rights of patrons to present to vacant parishes in Scotland, which, by an Act of the 
Scottish Parliament, passed in the first year of their late Majesties William and 
Mary, had been discharged, annulled, and made void, were restored to the said 
patrons. 

And whereas the exercise of the said rights of f atrons, in the manner and to the 
extent in which the same were restored under tlie said Act of her late Majesty (iueen 
Anne, has at various periods occasioned great dissensions in the (;hurch and among 
the people of Scotland, and has given rise to sundry evils and inconveniences which 
it is expedient for the future to obviate by certain modifications of the said rights of 
patrons, as hereinafter provided. 

May it therefore please your Majesty, That it may be enacted, and be it enacted 
b^' the Queen's most excellent Majesty, and by and with the advice and consent of 
the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assem 
bled, and by the autlit.rity of the same, Ttiat if, at the meeting held fur moderating 
in a call in favour of a presentee to any church or parisli in Scotland, the major 
part of the male parishioners or members of the congregation to which the minister 
is to be appointed (being of the age of twenty-one years complete), who, at the date 
when the then existing vacancy in the said church or parish occurred, were in full 
communion with the Clmrch of Scotland, shall not concur in the said call, either by 
subscribing the same, or by not expressly dissenting therefrom (all who do not so 
dissent being holden as concurring), but shall appear before the Presbytery, and state 
in its presence their dissent from the call ; and if, after the Presbytery shall have 
endeavoured, in the manner hereinafter provided, to remove anj- misapprehensions 
that may appear to them to exist in the minds of the parties so dissenting, their num- 



APPENDIX. 127 

ber shall not, by withdrawal of their dissents, be reduced to less than a majority of 
the whole male communicants as aforesaid, and the Presbytery or superior Church 
judicatory reviewing its judgment, do not find that the said dissent proceeds from 
factious or malicious motives, or otherwise than from a conscientious regard to the 
religious interests of the congregation— all right competent to the presentee under 
his presentation shall thereupon cease and determine ; and upon a final deliverance 
by the Presbytery or superior Church judicatory to that effect being pronounced, the 
patron shall have power to issue another presentation to a diflerent presentee, pro- 
vided the same be done within the period of six months allowed by law to patrons 
for presenting. It being declared always that, in computing the said period of six 
months, the interval which elapses between the lodging of any presentation with 
the Presbyter}', and the final deliverance pronounced thereupon by the Presbytery 
or other Church judicatory', shall in no case be reckoned or included ; and falling of 
the patron issuing another presentation within the said period, so computed, the jus 
devolutum shall take effect in manner hereinafter provided. 

Provided always, and be it fartlier enacted. That the individuals composing in each 
parish or congregation tlie body of male communicants hereinbefore mentioned as 
entitled to dissent from the call shall be ascertained, and the mode of stating their 
dissent before the Presbytery shall be fixed and regulated in such manner as the 
Church may direct; and it shall in all cases be incumbent on the Presbytery, before 
pronouncing any final deliverance on the said call, to take such means as to them 
shall seem most expedient to ascertain that the dissent of the major part of the male 
communicants as aforesaid, does not proceed from factious or malicious motives, and 
farther, if they see cause, to take such means as they may judge suitable for removing 
misapprehensions from tlie minds of the people, and obviating their objections to 
the presentee; and it shall in all cases be competent to the patron or the presentee, 
who maj' allege that the said dissent proceeds from factious or malicious motives, to 
establish the same before the Presbytery or superior Church judicatory by evidence, 
competent according to the law of the Church in the judgment of the said judica- 
tories. 

And be it further enacted. That in no case in which, in virtue of the provisions of 
this Act, the right of any presentee under a presentation in his favour shall 
have ceased, as aforesaid, shall it be competent for the Presbytery of the bounds, 
in any event, to claim or exercise any right tanquam jure deuoluto to present to 
the said Church or parish for that vacancy, any law or practice to the contrary 
notwithstanding ; and if thereafter the patron shall fail within the time by law pro- 
vided and computed as aforesaid, to issue a presentation which shall prove effectual 
to fill the vacancy, the right to present to the said church or parish for that vacancy 
shall thereupon devolve upon and be exercised by her Majesty and her heirs and suc- 
cessors, as fully and freely in all respects as the right to present tanquam jure devolu- 
to is at present used and exercised by Presbyteries of the Church ; the presentations 
or successive presentations so issued by her Majesty and her heirs and successors 
being always subject to the provisions of this present Act. 



No. V. 
FIRST SERIES OF RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE CONVOCATION OF MINIS- 
TERS ADHERING TO THE EVANGELICAL CAUSE IN THE CHURCH OF SCOT- 
LAND, WHICH MET IN NOVEMBER 1842. 

1. That according to the recent, and, as it appears to this Convocation unconstitu- 
tional decisions of the Supreme Civil Courts, and the interpretations which these de- 
cisions, if allowed or sanctioned by the supreme power in the State, would put upon 
the civil law,— the obligation to receive and admit a qualified presentee, imposed by 
the law of patronage on the Presbyteries of the Church, is a civil obligation, such as 
may be enforced by the ordinary compulsitors of civil law ; and, in particular, that 



128 APPENDIX. 

the rejection of a presentee in respect i>f the dissent of the congregation, according 
to the fundamental principle and law of the Church, is not merely an act to which 
the Civil Courts may refuse to give civil effect, but is in itself a civil wrong or of- 
fence, vehich may be dealt with accordingly by the Civil Courts. 

II. That other decisions of the Civil Courts, and, in particular, the decisions of 
the Lord Ordinary in the case of the deposition of the Strathbogie ministers, imply 
an assumption of a jurisdiction in the most sacred functions of the worship and go- 
vernment of the Church, especially in the matter of the deposition of ministers,— to 
the effect of reducing the sentences of Spiritual Courts in the exercise of discipline 
over ministers and members of the Church. 

III. That tliese claims to jurisdiction in spiritual matters, on the part of the Civil 
Courts, are based chiefly, if not altogether, upon the act of Queen Anne restoring Pa- 
tronage— an act from the first unjustifiable, and recently interpreted in a sense to 
which the Church cannot conscientiously submit, and to which she cannot consent 
to accommodate her ecclesiastical procedure. 

IV. That as the principle involved in these decisions, and particularly in the re- 
cent Auchterarder judgment, is that of the supremacj' of the Civil Courts over those 
of the Established Church, in the exercise of their spiritual functions ; so the mem- 
bers of the Convocation declare that no measure can in conscience be submitted to by 
them, which does not effectually protect the Church against the exercise of such 
jurisdiction by the Civil Courts in time to come, and, in particular, fully prevent 
all future encroachments of the nature specified in the preceding resolutions. 

V. That, in all their past contendings, the members of this Convocation have beeu 
actuated, and they trust that, in all their future proceedings, they will continue to 
be actuated, by a deep conviction of the value and excellence of the civil and ecclesi- 
astical constitution under which they live ; and that one of the chief causes of their 
present anxiety arises out of their impi-ession that the tendency and inevitable 
result of the recent decisions of the Civil Courts, especially if these shall be finally 
sanctioned as the law of the land, must be as entirelj' subversive of the constitution 
as it is repugnant to the principles of this Church and the consciences of her office- 
bearers. 

No. VI. 
SECOND SERIES OF RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY THE CONVOCATION. 

I. That, while the Church most solemnly protests against the invasion of her juris- 
diction by the Civil Courts, as contrary to the Word of God, the Confession of Faith, 
and the Constitution of this Kingdom ; and while, in particular, she is entitled, in the 
judgment of the brethren now assembled, to declare, as the General Assembly in the 
Claim of Rights, has declared, that the assumption bj^the Civil Courts of authority 
in matters spiritual, and especially in the ordination, admission, or deposition of 
ministers, and the other proceedings there set forth, is in violation of the law esta- 
blishing the Church, which was made unalterable by tlie Act of Security and the 
Treaty of Union, and that whatever is done in the exercise of that assumed authority, 
ought therefore to be held, as in right or de jure it is, null and void and of no effect : 
— still, whatever the nation in these circumstances might do, it is not the duty of the 
Church, as a kingdom not of this world, which has not and cannot have any power of 
the sword, or any secular dominion whatever, to plead her title, this acquired and 
secured, to the temporal benefits of her Establishment, in opposition or resistance to 
the supreme power of the State, except in the way of remonstrance, protest, and serious 
warning. 

II. That as, on the one hand, it is the bounden duty of the Church and of her faith- 
ful ministers, to represent to the supreme power of the State the nature of the invasions 
of the Civil Courts upon the spiritual province ; so, on the other hand, the refusal on 
the part of the State of such a remedy as has been declared indispensable to meet the 



APPENDIX. 129 

emergency, cannot be otheiwise construed than as being a recognition and sanction 
by the State of the principle which the decisions of the Civil Courts involve. 

III. That the brethren now assembled fully recognise the intrinsic authority and 
final jurisdiction of the Civil Magistrate, or the supreme power of the State, in the 
exercise of all civil functions, and in the discharge of all the duty which he owes to- 
ward the Church of Christ. And, in particular, they acknowledge the right of the 
Civil JMagistrate to fix the terms on which he will establish the Church, as a right 
which he is to use on his own responsibility, and in the use of which the Church is not 
entitled to resist him. And hence, accordinglj', as the Church, being essentially in- 
dependent of the Civil Magistrate in her spiritual province, is not bound, and is not 

at libertj', to conform her procedurein_thegovernment of Christ's House to the orders 
of the State, or of any Courts of the State, against her convictions of duty founded on 
the Word of God ; so neither is she warranted in prescribing to the Civil Magistrate, 
or requiring him to act according to her views, whether in the administration of civil 
affairs generally, or in what he does towards religion, or about things sacred, — as in 
his giving to the Church, or withholding from her, the civil countenance and support ; 
nor may the Church resist hi sdetermination in these matters, since in both depart- 
ments of his duty, the Civil Magistrate is always bound to act according to his own 
conscience, under the rule of the Word of God, and on his own responsibility to 
God. 

IV. That it is the duty of the faithful ministers of this Church not to continue to 
receive the endowments or emoluments secured to them by the civil law, nor to in- 
volve themselves in the manifold inconveniences and serious evils of a protracted 
struggle with the civil power, after it shall appear that the supreme power of the 
State, by refusing to relieve them from the interference of the Civil Courts in things 
spiritual, does thereby substantially and eflFectually sanction the condition which the 
Civil Courts would attach to their holding of these endowments or emoluments, and 
to which the}' never can submit or yield obedience, viz., the condition of subjection 
to civil control in matters spiritual, and of being bound against their consciences to 
intrude ministers upon reclaiming congregations. 

V. That it is the duty of the Ministers now assembled, and of all who adhere to their 
views, to make a solemn representation to her Majesty's Government, and to both 
Houses of Parliament, setting forth the imminent and extreme peril of the Establish- 
ment, the inestimable value of the benefits which it confers on the country, and the 
pain and reluctance with which they are forced to contemplate the possibility of the 
Church's separation, for conscience' sake, from the State,— respectfully calling upon 
the rulers of this nation to maintain the Constitution of the kingdom inviolate, and 
to uphold a pure establishment ofreligitm in the land,— and, finally, intimating, that 
as the endowments of the Church are undoubtedly at the disposal of the supreme 
power of the State, with whom it rests either to continue to the Church her possession 
of them, free from any limitation of her spiritual jurisdiction and freedom, or with- 
draw them altogether,— so it must be the duty of the Church, and, consequently, in 
dependence on the grace of God, it is the determination of the brethren now assem- 
bled, — if no measure such as they have declared to be indispensable be granted, — to 
tender the resignation of those civil advantages, which they can no longer hold in 
consistency with the free and full exercise of their spiritual functions, and to cast 
themselves on such provision as God in His providence may afford ; maintaining 
still uncompromised the principle of a right scriptural connection between the 
Church and the State, and solemnly entering their protest against the judgments of 
which they complain, as in their decided opinion altogether contrary to what has ever 
hitherto been understood to be the law and constitution of this country. 



130 APPENDIX. 

No. VII. 

FIRST BILL, " TO REMOVE DOUBTS," &c. INTRODUCED BY THE EARL OF 
ABERDEEN INTO THE HOUSE OF LORDS, 

AND REJECTED BY A GREAT MAJORITY OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF 1840 AS AN UNSATIS- 
FACTORY AND INADMISSIBLE SETTLEMENT OF THE QUESTION OF NON-INTRUSION. 

Whereas certain acts of Parliament of Scotland, and of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain, have declared, that the right of collation, in regard to the settlement of 
ministers, in the parishes to which they may be presented, belongs to the Church esta- 
blished by law in that part of the United Kingdom called Scotland : 

And whereas provision has been made by these statutes for securing to the Church 
the exclusive right of examining and admitting any person who may be presented to 
a benefice having cure by the patron of such benefice, and, in particular, by an act 
passed in the Parliament of Scotland in the year 1567, intituled, " Admission of Mi- 
nisters of Laick Patronages," it is statute and ordained " that the examination and 
admission of ministers within this realme be only in the power of the Kirk, now 
openlie and publickly professed within the samin. The presentation^of laick patron- 
ages alwaies reserved to the just and auncient patrones ;" and by an act passed in the 
Parliament of Scotland, in the year 1592, intituled " Ratification of the Liberty of 
the Trew Kirk," the government of the Church by Presbyteries, Synods, and General 
Assemblies, was ratified and established ; and it was ordained, that all presentations 
to benefices "be direct to the particular Presbyteries in all time cumming, with full 
power to give collation thereupon, and to put ordour to all matters and causes eccle- 
siastical within their boundes, according to the discipline of the Kirk. Providing 
the foresaid Presbyteries be bound and astricted to receive and admit whatsomever 
qualified minister presented by his Majesty or laick patrones." And by an act of the 
Parliament of Great Britain, passed in the tenth year of the reign of her Majesty 
Queen Anne, intituled, " An act to restore the patrons to their auncient right of pre- 
senting ministers to the churches vacant in that part of Great Britain called Scotland," 
the right of the Church to receive and admit persons presented to benefices was again 
recognised and secured ; and by an act of the Parliament of Great Britain, passed in 
the fifth year of the reign of his Majesty King George the First, intituled, " An act 
for making more efi'ectual the laws appointing the oaths for security of the Govern- 
ment, to be taken by ministers and preachers in churches in Scotland," providing 
that certain oaths should be taken by ministers and preachers of the Church of Scot- 
land, and for preventing delays in the supplying or filling up of vacant churches in 
Scotland, it is also declared and enacted, " That nothing herein contained shall pre- 
judice or diminish the right of the Church, as the same now stands by law established, 
as to the trying of the qualities of any person presented to any church or benefice :" 

And whereas it is expedient to remove any doubt which may exist as to the powers 
and jurisdiction of the Church, as by law established in Scotland, in the matter of 
collation, and to declare the right of the Church to decide, that no person be settled 
in any parish or benefice having cure, against whom, or whose settlement, in such 
parish or benefice there exists any just cause of exception ; 

May it, therefore, please your Majesty, that it may be declared and enacted, and be 
it declared and enacted by the Queen's most excellent Majesty, by and with the ad- 
vice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present 
Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same : That when a presentation 
to any benefice, within that part of the United Kingdom called Scotland, by the un- 
doubted patron, has been laid before the Presbytery of the bounds, it shall and may 
be lawful for the Presbytery, as part, and as the commencement of the proceedings 
in the examination and admission of the person so presented for the cure of that pa- 
rish, to appoint him to preach in the church of the said parish, at such times, and in 
such manner, as the Presbytery may direct, or as may be directed by any regulations 



APPENDIX. 131 

of the General Assembly to that effect : And after the presentee shall have preached 
in the parish church, according to the directions of the Presbytery, the Presbytery, 
or a committee of their number, shall meet, after due notice, at the said church, and 
shall intimate, that if any one or more persons being in regular communion with the 
church, and of full age and standing upon the communion-roll of the parish, to be 
made up in such manner as the church may direct, have any objection of any kind to 
the individual so presented, or any reason to state against his settlement in that pa- 
rish, and against his gifts and qualities for the cure of the said parish, but which ob- 
jections or reasons do not infer matter of charge against the presentee, to be prosecuted 
and followed out according to the forms and discipline of the Church, the Presbytery 
are ready, either then or at their next meeting, to receive the same in writing, or to 
write down the same in their minutes, in the form and manner which such communi- 
cants may desire ; which objections or reasons shall, without delay, be fully consi- 
dered and disposed of by the Pi-esbytery by whom they are to be cognosced and 
determined, or shall be referred by the Presbytery to the superior Church Courts for 
decision, as the Presbytery may see cause ; the presentee and all parties having 
interest being heard in either case on the same. 

And be it further enacted, That if the Presbytery or other Church Court shall be 
of opinion, due regard being had to the whole circumstances and condition of the pa- 
rish and to the spiritual welfare and edification of the people, that in respect of any 
of the said objections or reasons, the individual presented ouglit not to be settled in 
the said parish, the Presbj'tery or other church court shall set forth and specify in 
their deliverance the special ground or grounds on which it is founded, and in respect 
of which they find that the presentee is not qualified for that charge ; in which event 
they shall intimate their deliverance respecting the presentee to the patron, who shall 
thereupon have power to issue another presentation within the period prescribed by 
law. 

Provided always, and be it enacted. That it shall be in the power of the presentee, 
patron, or communicants, to appeal from any deliverance pronounced as aforesaid ; 
which appeal shall lie exclusively to the Superior Ecclesiastical Courts, according to 
the forms and government of the Church of Scotland as by law establislied. 

And be it further enacted, That if the Presbytery or other Church Court, after con- 
sidering all the objections to the presentee, and all the reasons whicli may be stated 
against liis settlement in that particular parish, are satisfied, in the discharge of their 
functions, and in the exercise of their authority and duty as ministers of the gospel, 
and as oiEce-bearers in the Church, that no good objection against the individual, or 
no good reason against his settlement, has been stated as aforesaid, or that the objec- 
tions and reasons stated are not truly founded on any objection personal to the pre- 
sentee in regard to his ministerial gifts and qualities, either in general or with re- 
ference to that particular parish, or arise from causeless prejudices, the Presbytery 
shall then repel the same, and, subject to the right of appeal as aforesaid, shall proceed 
to the farther trials and examination of the presentee, and, if found by them to be 
qualified for the ministry in that parish, shall admit and receive him into the bene- 
fice, as b^' law provided. 



SECOND BILL, " TO REMOVE DOUBTS," &c. INTRODUCED BY HIS LORDSHIP AFTER 
THE DISRUPTION, AND WHICH IS NOW THE LAW OF THE ESTABLISHMENT. 

A BILL, INTITULED, AN ACT TO REMOVE DOUBTS RESPECTING THE ADMISSION! OV MINISTERS 
TO BENEFICES IN THAT PART OF THE UNITED KINGDOM CALLED SCOTLAND. 

"Whereas cretain acts of the Parliament of Scotland, and of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain, have declared that the right of collation in regard to the settlement 



34 APPENDIX. 

No presentee to be rejected unlets dissent or dislike be founded upon objections to be judged 
of by Preshtjtery, dx., d:c. 
And be it enacted, That it shall not be lawful for any Presbytery, or other judica- 
tory of the Church, to reject any presentee upon the ground of any mere dissent or 
dislike expressed by any part of the congregation of the parish to which he is presented, 
and which dissent or dislike shall not be founded upon objections or reasons to be 
fully cognosced, judged of, and determined in the manner aforesaid by the said Pres- 
bytery, or other judicatory of the Church. 

Presentee, &c., may appeal to superior judicatory of the Church frotn deliverance of 



And be it enacted. That it shall be in the power of the presentee, patron, or objec- 
tors, to appeal from any deliverance pronounced as aforesaid by the said Presbytery 
acting within its competency as a judicatory of the Church, which appeal shall lie 
exclusively to the superior judicatories of the Church, according to the forms and 
government of the Church of Scotland as by law established. 

The right of presentees now in possession not to be challenged, although a former presentee 
may have been rejected under the act of General Assembly of May 1835. 
And whereas by act of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, of date 
twenty-ninth May one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five, it was made an in- 
struction to Presbyteries, that if, at the moderating in a call to a vacant parish, the 
major part of the male heads of families, members of the vacant congregation, and 
in full communion with the Church, shall disapprove of the person in whose favour 
the call is proposed to be moderated in, such disapproval shall be deemed sufficient 
ground for the Presbytery rejecting such person, and that he shall be rejected accor- 
dingly, and certain regulations were passed for carrying the said instructions into 
effect : And whereas it has been found, by final judgment of the Court of Session, 
affirmed by the House of Lords, that a Presbytery acting in pursuance of said act of 
Assembly and regulations, refusing to take trial of the qualifications of a presentee 
and rejecting him on the sole ground that a majority of the male heads of families, 
communicants in the said parish, have dissented, without any reasons assigned, from 
his admission as minister, acted illegally and in violation of their duty, and contrary 
to the provisions of certain statutes of the realm, and particularly the statute of the 
tenth year of Queen Anne, chapter twelve, intituled " An act to restore patrons to 
their ancient rights of presenting ministers to the churches vacant in that part of 
Great Britain called Scotland:" And whereas in some instances a presentee has, in 
pursuance of the said act of Assembly, and regulations relative thereto, been rejected 
by a Presbytery because of the dissents of male heads of families, communicants, and 
a presentation has thereafter been issued in favour of a second or subsequent presen- 
tee who has been settled in the same benefice, and whose settlement therein and 
right thereto have not been questioned in any court of law : And whereas it is expe- 
dient that such settlement in and right to the benefice should be secured and pro- 
tected from future challenge on the ground of the incompetency of the rejection of 
the first or prior presentee ; be it enacted, that it shall not be competent to challenge 
the settlement or right to the benefice of any such second or subsequent presentee, 
or to maintain any proceedings at law against the Presbytery or ministers thereof, 
or other parties, on account of such rejection, unless such challenge or proceedings 
shall have been instituted by action raised in a court of law before the first day of 
May last. 



( 135 ) 



INDEX. 







Page. 1 


I 


'age. 


Introduction, 


. . . • 


. 5 


Fife. 




Lothian and Tweeddale (Synod of). 


44 Presbytery of Cupar, 


71 


1 Presbytery of Edinburgh, 


17 


45 „ St Andrews, 


73 


2 


Linlithgow, 


. 20 


Angus and Mearns. 




3 


Biggar, . 


22 


46 Presbytery of Meigle, . 


75 


4 


Peebles, 


. 23 


75 


5 


Dalkeith, 


23 


48 " Dundee, . * . 


76 


6 


Haddington, 


. 25 


49 „ Arbroath, . 


78 


7 


Dunbar, . 


26 


50 „ Brechin, 


79 


Merse and Teviotdale. 




51 „ Fordoun, 


80 


8 Presbytery 


of Dunse, 


. 28 


Aberdeen. 




9 „ 


Chirnside, 


28 


52 Presbytery of Aberdeen, 


82 


10 


Kelso, . 


. 29 


53 „ Kincardine O'Niel 


84 


11 


Jedburgh, 


30 


54 „ Alford, 


85 


12 


Lauder, 


. 31 


55 „ Garioch, 


85 


13 


Selkirk, . 


32 


56 „ Ellon, 


86 


Dumfries. 






57 „ Deer, 


86 


14 Presbytery 


of Lochmaben, 


. 33 


58 „ Turriff, 


88 


15 „ 


Langholm, 


34 


59 „ Fordyce, 


88 


16 


Annan, 


. 34 


Moray. 




17 


Dumfries, 


35 


60 Presbytery of Strathbogie, . 


90 


18 


Penpont, 


. 36 


61 „ Abernethy, 


91 


Galloway. 






62 „ Aberlour, 


92 


19 Presbytery 


of Stranraer, 


38 


63 „ Forres, 


92 


20 ,, 


Wigtown, . 


. 39 


64 „ Elgin, . 


93 


21 


Kirkcudbright, 


39 


65 „ Inverness, . 


93 


Glasgow and Ayr. 




66 „ Nairn, 


94 


22 Presbytery of Ayr, . 


. 41 


Ross. 




23 


Irvine, 


. 43 


67 Presbytery of Chanonry, . 


95 


24 


Paisley, 


. 44 


68 „ Dingwall, 


96 


25 


Greenock, 


45 


69 „ Tain, . 


96 


26 


Hamilton, . 


. 46 


Sutherland and Caithness. 




27 


Lanark, . 


49 


70 Presbytery of Dornoch, . 


98 


28 


Dumbarton, , 


. 49 


71 „ Tongue, 


98 


29 


Glasgow, . 


51 


72 „ Caithness, 


99 


Argyle. 






Glenelg. 




30 Presbytery 


of Inverary, . 


56 


73 Presbytery of Lochcarron, 


100 


31 


Dunoon, 


. 56 


74 „ Abertarff, 


101 


32 


Kintyre, . 


57 


75 „ Skye, 


101 


33 


Isla and Jura, 


. 58 


76 „ Uist, 


102 


34 


Lorn, 


. 59 


77 „ Lewis, 


102 


35 


Mull, . 


- 59 


Orkney. 




Perth and Stirling. 




78 Presbytery of Kirkwall, 


103 


36 Presbytery 


ofDunkeld, . 


. 60 


79 „ Cairston, 


104 


37 ;, 


Weem, 


. 61 


80 „ North Isles, . 


105 


38 


Perth, . 


62 


Shetland. 




39 


Auchterarder, 


. 64 


81 Presbytery of Lerwick, 


106 


40 


Stirling, . 


. 65 


82 „ Burravoe, . 


106 


41 


Dunblane, . 


. 66 






Fife. 






Table No. I.— Exhibiting a general 




42 Presbytery of Dunfermline, 


69 


view of the number of Ministers in 




43 „ 


Kirkaldy, . 


. 70 


each Synod, and over the whole 





136 



Page. 
Church, adhering to the Free 
Church and to each Class of the 
Residuary Establishment, the per 
centage of secession, &c. &c. . . 108 
Table No. II.— Exhibiting a view of 
the number of Ministers in the Free 
Church and in each Class of the 
Residuary Establishment ordained 
during last century, and in each ten 
years of tlie present century, &c. . 109 

Classified Roll of the Ministers of 
Chapels of Ease in connection with 
the Establishment, of Ordained As- 
sistant Ministers, and of Mission- 
aries of the Society for the Pro- 
pagation of Christian Knowledge, 
having no seat in Church Courts, . 110 

Classified Roll of Missionaries em- 
ployed by the Committee of the 
Genei'al Assembly for Managing 
the Royal Bounty, . . . .112 

1 Mission in India, . . . 115 

2 „ to the Jews, . . 115 
General Assembly's Missionaries in 

the Presbytery of Strathbogie — 
Parishes of the deposed Ministers, . 115 

Roll of Missionaries on Foreign Sta- 
tions, in connection with the Church 
of Scotland, 115 

Roll of Probationers adhering to the 
Free Church, 116 

Appendix. 

1 Declaration against Lord Aber- 
deen's Bill, . . . .119 



2 Solemn Engagement in Defence 

of the Liberties of the Church 
and People of Scotland, . . 120 

3 Extract from the Claim of Rights, 

Declaration and Protest, adopt- 
ed by the General Assembly 

1842 124 

i Measure of Non-intrusion intro- 
duced into the House of Lords 
by his Grace the Duke of Argyle, 
and approved of by the General 
Assembly of 1841 by an over- 
whelming majorit}^ . . . 12G 

5 First Series of Resolutions adopt- 

ed by the Convocation of Mi- 
nisters adhering to the Evan- 
gelical cause in the Church of 
Scotland, which met in Novem 
her 1842, 127 

6 Second Series of Resolutions 

adopted by the Convocation, . 128 

7 First Bill " to remove doubts," 

&c., introduced by the Earl of 
Aberdeen into the House of 
Lords, and rejected by a great 
majority of the General Assem- 
blj' of 1840 as an unsatisfactory' 
and an inadmissible settlement 
of the question of Non-intru- 
sion, . . . . . .130 

8 Second Bill " to remove doubts," 

&c., introduced by his Lordship 
after the disruption, and which 
is now the law of the Establish- 
ment, 131 



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